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Items Tagged ‘Florida News Release’

July 1st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Researchers Reveal Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, say researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida. Eight of these genes had not been previously linked to kidney cancer, and six other genes were never known to be involved in any form of cancer.

 

Their study, in the journal Oncotarget, is the most extensive analysis to date of gene expression’s role in ccRCC tumor growth and metastasis. The ccRCC subtype accounts for 80 percent of all kidney cancer cases. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: cancer, Dr Derek Radisky, Dr. Han Tun, Dr John Copland, Florida News Release, kidney cancer, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, News Release


June 24th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Researchers Say Gene in Brain Linked to Kidney Cancer

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting.

Their study, published in Cancer Research, reveals that the gene NPTX2, plays an essential role in this cancer type, which is resistant to common chemotherapy and has a five-year overall survival rate of less than 10 percent in patients with metastatic disease. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: cancer, Cancer Biology, Dr Derek Radisky, Dr. Han Tun, Dr John A Copland, Dr Panagiotis Anastasiadis, Dr Stefan Grebe, Florida News Release, kidney cancer, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, molecular biology, News Release


June 6th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Endoscope with an Oxygen Sensor Detects Pancreatic Cancer, Providing Hope for Earlier Detection, Mayo Clinic Says

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — June 6, 2014 — An optical blood oxygen sensor attached to an endoscope is able to identify pancreatic cancer in patients via a simple endoscopic procedure, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

The study, published in GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, shows that the device, which acts like the well-known clothespin-type finger clip used to measure blood oxygen in patients, has a sensitivity of 92 percent and a specificity of 86 percent.

That means, of 100 patients with pancreatic cancer, this sensor would detect 92 of them, based on the findings. And of 100 patients who don’t have pancreatic cancer, the test would correctly identify them 86 percent of the time. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: cancer, Dr Michael Wallace, Florida News Release, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, News Release, Pancreatic Cancer


June 3rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Researchers Decode How the Brain Miswires, Possibly Causing ADHD

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida and at Aarhus University in Denmark have shed light on why neurons in the brain’s reward system can be miswired, potentially contributing to disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

SorCS2 knockout

The image shows the pattern of movement of mice treatment with saline or with dex-amphetamine (ADHD medicine). Dex-amphetamine has a calming effect on mice lacking the SorCS2 gene, reminiscent of ADHD in humans.

They say findings from their study, published online today in Neuron, may increase the understanding of underlying causes of ADHD, potentially facilitating the development of more individualized treatment strategies.

The scientists looked at dopaminergic neurons, which regulate pleasure, motivation, reward, and cognition, and have been implicated in development of ADHD.

They uncovered a receptor system that is critical, during embryonic development, for correct wiring of the dopaminergic brain area. But they also discovered that after brain maturation, a cut in the same receptor, SorCS2, produces a two-chain receptor that induces cell death following damage to the peripheral nervous system.

The researchers report that the SorCS2 receptor functions as a molecular switch between apparently opposing effects in proBDNF. ProBDNF is a neuronal growth factor that helps select cells that are most beneficial to the nervous system, while eliminating those that are less favorable in order to create a finely tuned neuronal network.
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Tags: Aarhus University, ADHD, Dr Anders Nykjaer, Florida News Release, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, neurons, News Release


June 1st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

ALTTO Test of Dual HER2 Blockade Finds Single Agent – Trastuzumab – Remains Gold Standard

By Paul Scotti

Journalists: Broadcast soundbites with Dr. Perez are available in the downloads.

CHICAGO — In the largest clinical trial testing the effectiveness of one versus two drugs to treat HER2-positive breast cancer, lapatinib (Tykerb) did not add benefit to the standard trastuzumab (Herceptin) adjuvant therapy, researchers report at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Results of the phase III clinical trial, ALTTO (Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization study), demonstrated that adding lapatinib to trastuzumab and chemotherapy did not improve patient outcome (defined as disease-free survival or overall survival), and that use of lapatinib significantly increased toxicity.

“These findings suggest that standard adjuvant (post-surgery) treatment for early stage HER2-positive breast cancer should remain trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy,” says Edith A. Perez, M.D., deputy director at large of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, and director of the Breast Cancer Translational Genomics Program at Mayo Clinic in Florida.
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Tags: Breast Cancer, Breast International Group, Dr Edith Perez, Dr Martine Piccart, Florida News Release, Glaxo SmithKline, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, National Cancer Institute NCI, News Release, Université Libre de Bruxelles


May 30th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tumor Size is Defining Factor to Response from Promising Melanoma Drug

By Paul Scotti

CHICAGO — In examining why some advanced melanoma patients respond so well to the experimental immunotherapy MK-3475, while others have a less robust response, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida found that the size of tumors before treatment was the strongest variable.

They say their findings, being presented June 2 at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), offered several clinical insights that could lead to different treatment strategies and perhaps influence staging of advanced melanoma.

“This was the first robust assessment to determine the impact of baseline tumor size on clinical endpoints in patients with metastatic melanoma — in particular — those receiving MK-3475. Our findings suggest the location of spread is less important than the amount of tumor that is present before treatment,” says the study’s lead investigator, Richard W. Joseph, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

Journalists: Broadcast sound bites with Dr. Joseph are available in the downloads.

 

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Tags: Dr. Richard Joseph, Florida News Release, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, Melanoma, merck, News Release


May 20th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Researchers Say Molecule Linked to Aggressive Pancreatic Cancer Offers Potential Clinical Advances

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered an enzyme they say is tightly linked to how aggressive pancreatic cancer will be in a patient.

They say the study, published in Molecular Cancer Research, provides key insights into the most aggressive form of the disease, which is one of the deadliest human cancers.

It also offers a number of possible future clinical advances, such as a way to gauge outcome in individual patients, and insight into potential therapy to shut down activity of the enzyme, known as Rac1b.

Derek Radisky, Ph.D., molecular cancer research

Induction of pretumorigenic conditions in response to Rac1b.
Inappropriate expression of the tumor microenvironment molecule collagen-1 (brown) in pancreatic tissue expressing Rac1b.

“The implication from our research is that Rac1b is activating unique pathways in pancreatic tumors that make this cancer aggressive. If we can therapeutically target that pathway, we may be able to have an impact on this very difficult-to-treat disease,” says the study’s senior investigator, Derek Radisky, Ph.D., a researcher with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Jacksonville, Fla.

A potential drug target would have to be found within the cancer-causing pathways activated by Rac1b, since the enzyme is difficult to target because it is involved in many normal biological processes, Dr. Radisky says. He and his colleagues are now working to uncover how Rac1b ramps up pancreatic cancer progression.

The RAC1 superfamily of proteins — which play important regulatory roles in cell growth and cell movement — have been implicated in other cancers, such as melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer, but before this study, no one knew that one sub-form, Rac1b, played a role in pancreatic cancer.

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Tags: cancer, Dr Derek Radisky, Florida News Release, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, Molecular Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NCI, News Release, Pancreatic Cancer


April 30th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Atypical Form of Alzheimer’s Disease May be Present in a More Widespread Number of Patients, Mayo Clinic Says

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida have defined a subtype of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that they say is neither well recognized nor treated appropriately.

The variant, called hippocampal sparing AD, made up 11 percent of the 1,821 AD-confirmed brains examined by Mayo Clinic researchers — suggesting this subtype is relatively widespread in the general population. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that 5.2 million Americans are living with AD. And with nearly half of hippocampal sparing AD patients being misdiagnosed, this could mean that well over 600,000 Americans make up this AD variant, researchers say. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, Dr. Melissa Murray, Florida News Release, Frontotemporal Dementia, Mayo Clinic in Florida, MayoClinicFL, Neurology, neuroscience, News Release, Research


April 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Neurologists Lead International Study to Test Best Approach to Stroke Prevention

By Kevin Punsky

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbNqjSGG0uI

The $39.5-million grant to fund stroke study is one of largest ever awarded to investigators at Mayo Clinic in Florida 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Is medicine as safe and effective as surgery or stenting in preventing a stroke caused by the buildup of plaque in the carotid artery? Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, aims to find out.Senior woman appearing to have head pain or stroke

“It’s a critical question. The quality medicines we have today may mean that it is not necessary to perform invasive procedures on patients who do not have warning signs of stroke,” Dr. Brott says. “More than 100,000 carotid surgeries and carotid artery stentings are performed each year in the United States on such patients at risk — and that may not be necessary.”

To find the answer, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has awarded Dr. Brott and his colleague, James Meschia, M.D., $39.5 million — one of the largest grants ever awarded to Mayo Clinic in Florida investigators. The grant funds a seven-year clinical trial that will enroll 2,480 patients in 120 centers in the United States, Canada, Europe and Australia. The study, known as CREST-2, is expected to begin enrolling patients this summer. Management of the patient data and the statistical analysis will be carried out at the University of Alabama at Birmingham under the direction of George Howard, Dr.PH.
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Tags: carotid arteries, carotid artery stenting, carotid endarterectomy, CAS, CEA, clinical trials, CREST Trial, CREST-2, Dr James Meschia, Dr Thomas Brott, Florida News Release, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, News Release, NINDS, research funding, stroke, surgery versus stenting


February 10th, 2014 · 1 Comment

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Two Oncogenes Join to Drive Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

By Kevin Punsky

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Patients with a common form of lung cancer — lung squamous cell carcinoma — have very few treatment options. That situation may soon change.

A team of cancer biologists at Mayo Clinic in Florida is reporting in the Feb. 10 issue of Cancer Cell the discovery of two oncogenes that work together to sustain a population of cells in lung squamous cell carcinoma, which may be responsible for the lethality of the disease. When these cells, termed cancer stem cells, are inhibited, tumors cannot develop.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Fields are available in the downloads.

“Cancer stem cells are a small population of cells in a tumor that can self-renew and grow indefinitely. They resist most treatments and are thought to be responsible for relapse,” says the study’s senior author, Alan P. Fields, Ph.D., the Monica Flynn Jacoby Professor of Cancer Studies at Mayo Clinic in Florida. “If you can shut down cancer stem cells, you may be able to stop relapse after therapy,” he says.
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Tags: Alan P Fields, CANCER RESEARCH, Lung Cancer, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic in Florida, PhD, squamous cell carcinoma, MayoClinicFL, Florida News Release, News Release, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center