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September 27th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Family history of kidney stones increases risk

By lizatorborg

Kidney stones illustrationDEAR MAYO CLINIC: My family has a history of kidney stones, and I would like to prevent them if possible. What should I do to keep from getting kidney stones? Are there foods or drinks I should avoid?

ANSWER: A family history of kidney stones does increase your risk of developing stones. But you can take a number of steps to help prevent kidney stones from forming. One of the most important is to drink plenty of fluids each day. Making certain dietary choices and staying at a healthy weight also can lower your risk.

Your kidneys filter waste and excess fluid from your blood. That waste and fluid leave your body through urine. Kidney stones form when urine contains more crystal-forming substances —such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, due to your genetics or other factors, your urine may not have substances that keep crystals from sticking together. That creates an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

For people with family members who have had kidney stones, the risk of stones is about twice as high as people that do not have a family history. Other factors that can raise your risk include surgeries that change your digestive process, such as gastric bypass, and diseases that affect your digestion, such as inflammatory bowel disease or chronic diarrhea.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: dehydration, diabetes, Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr. Krambeck, kidney stones, Weekend Wellness


August 11th, 2014

Protected: Downloads for week of 8-11-2014

By Audrey Caseltine

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Tags: Dr. Amy Krambeck, Dr. Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio, Radio


August 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Kidney Stones: Mayo Clinic Radio

By Joel Streed

Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer.  We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D.   Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-9-14

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Tags: Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio, podcast


August 8th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures


Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August? On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer. We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D. Please join us.

Myth or Matter of Fact: Drinking soda causes kidney stones.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment August 9, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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Tags: Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio


August 6th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Summer Stones — Kidney Stones in August

By Dana Sparks

Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?

Kidney stones affect approximately 3.8 million people in the U.S. each year, the number of cases is on the rise and they are especially more common in the summer. The stones are described as small, hard deposits of mineral and acid salts that form when urine becomes concentrated. The minerals crystallize and stick together, forming a stone which can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball.

illustration of kidney stones

According to Mayo Clinic nephrologist William Haley, M.D., heat, humidity and lack of proper hydration all lead to a higher prevalence of kidney stones in the summer. “The main reason is due to the amount of water we take in and use. Our bodies are made up of mostly water and we use it regularly. But in the heat, we may not be drinking as much as we should, or taking in the right types of fluids, so we become dehydrated, which can lead to more stones.” Dr. Haley adds, "Kidney stones are really very common — up to 13 percent of men, and 6 to 7 percent of women, could get a kidney stone sometime in their life — starting in the twenties and peaking in the fifties." Once you get a kidney stone, you are at risk of getting one again.

Here are tips for avoiding and coping with kidney stones:

  • Hydration is key. Drinking more water is essential.
  • Diet is also very important to prevent stones. Oxalate-rich foods, such as nuts and certain vegetables, coupled with a diet that's high in protein, sodium and sugar, may increase calcium in the kidneys and subsequently raise the risk of kidney stones.
  • Kidney stones may not cause problems until they move into the ureter tube that connects the kidney and bladder. When that occurs, a stone can bring immense pain as it passes through the urinary tract into the bladder. As well, many people can experience an array of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, blood in their urine or fever. If you experience any of these symptoms, seek immediate medical attention.

Journalists: A video pkg. featuring a patient and separate sound bites with Dr. Haley are available in the downloads. To interview Dr. Haley contact Cindy Weiss, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Tune in this Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, for the Mayo Clinic Radio show. We'll discuss further why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer with nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D..

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Tags: dehydration, Dr William Haley, kidney stones


August 5th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Radio: Kidney Stones

By McCray

Miss the show? Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-9-14

Want to find out more on Ebola? Dr Pritish Tosh called in: Dr Tosh on Ebola 8-9-14

Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer.  We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D.  Please join us.

Myth or Matter of Fact: Drinking soda causes kidney stones.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

For future topics, click on Upcoming Programs.
To listen to archived shows, click on Episodes.

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Tags: Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio, nephrology, Radio, Urology


February 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

El tratamiento de los cálculos renales depende del tipo y origen

By Soledad Andrade

ESTIMADA MAYO CLINIC:
Continúo presentando cálculos renales, pese a que bebo mucha cantidad de agua. Hasta ahora, han sido muy pequeños y no he necesitado tratamiento, pero el médico dijo que si mis síntomas empeoran, lo necesitaré. ¿Qué implicaría el tratamiento?

Ilustración de cálculos renales

Cálculos renales
© Fundación Mayo para la Educación e Investigación Médica. Todos los derechos reservados.

RESPUESTA:
El tratamiento de los cálculos renales depende del tipo de cálculo y de su origen. En muchos casos de cálculos pequeños, basta con realizar cambios en la alimentación y en los medicamentos; pero cuando los cálculos s on más grandes, probablemente se requiera otro tratamiento.

Los cálculos renales se forman a partir de minerales y sales ácidas. Alrededor de 85 por ciento de los cálculos renales son de base cálcica, normalmente de oxalato de calcio; y menos comunes son los cálculos de ácido úrico, de estruvita y de cistina. El médico puede realizar análisis de orina y sangre para descubrir el tipo de cálculos que usted tiene. Si ya botó algún cálculo, el laboratorio puede analizarlo para descubrir su composición. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: calcio, Calcium, cálculos renales, Dr Canzanello, Dr Vincent Canzanello, En español, espanol, kidney stones, nefrología, spanish, Preguntas y respuestas


February 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

TUESDAY Q & A: Treatment for kidney stones depends on type and cause of stones

By Dana Sparks

DEAR MAYO CLINIC:
I continue to get kidney stones despite drinking plenty of water. They are quite small and I haven’t had to be treated yet. But my doctor said if my symptoms get worse, I will need treatment. What would that involve?

Kidney stones illustration

ANSWER:
Treatment for kidney stones depends on the type of stone and their cause. In many cases, dietary changes and medication are all that’s needed for small stones. Larger stones may require additional treatment. Kidney stones form from minerals and acid salts. About 85 percent of kidney stones are calcium based, typically calcium oxalate. Less common are uric acid stones, struvite stones and cystine stones. Your doctor can use blood and urine tests to find out what kind of stones you have. If you have passed a stone, a laboratory analysis can reveal the makeup of the stone.

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Tags: Calcium, dietary changes, Dr Canzanello, Dr Vincent Canzanello, kidney stones, nephrology, Tuesday Q & A


November 8th, 2013 · Leave a Comment

Treatment for Kidney Stones Depends of Type and Cause of Stones

By Shawn Bishop

Treatment for Kidney Stones Depends of Type and Cause of Stones

November 8, 2013

Dear Mayo Clinic:

I continue to get kidney stones despite drinking plenty of water. They are quite small and I haven't had to be treated yet. But my doctor said if my symptoms get worse, I will need treatment. What would that involve?

Answer:

Treatment for kidney stones depends on the type of stone and their cause. In many cases, dietary changes and medication are all that's needed for small stones. Larger stones may require additional treatment.

Kidney stones form from minerals and acid salts. About 85 percent of kidney stones are calcium based, typically calcium oxalate. Less common are uric acid stones, struvite stones and cystine stones. Your doctor can use blood and urine tests to find out what kind of stones you have. If you have passed a stone, a laboratory analysis can reveal the make-up of the stone.

If your stones are calcium oxalate — as most kidney stones are — you need to keep doing what you have already started: drink lots of water. The typical recommendation is to drink about 8 to 10 ounces of water every hour you are awake.

There are several benefits to drinking that much water when dealing with kidney stones. First, it flushes out your urinary system and helps small stones pass more easily. Second, diluted urine lowers the chances that calcium oxalate stones will form in the first place. Drinking plenty of water can help prevent uric acid stones and cystine stones, too.

A variety of changes in your diet can lower your risk of forming new calcium oxalate stones. Oxalate is a substance found in certain foods. For people at risk for these kidney stones, eating fewer oxalate-rich foods can help. They include foods such as spinach, beets, Swiss chard, rhubarb, almonds and granola, among others.

A low-salt diet can be useful in preventing calcium oxalate kidney stones, as can getting the right amount of calcium from the foods you eat. Some people with kidney stones are advised to eat more citrus fruits because a substance in those fruits, called citrate, can naturally inhibit stone formation.

For uric acid stones, cutting back on the amount of protein you eat — especially protein from animal sources — may help prevent new stones.

Ask your doctor to recommend a dietitian you can talk with about a diet that is right for you. He or she can review food choices that may lower your risk of new kidney stones and help you plan some sample menus to get started.

In some cases, medication also can treat kidney stones and prevent new ones from forming. Again, the specific medicine you need depends on the type of stone you have. Doctors often prescribe a thiazide diuretic — a water pill — for people with calcium stones. In addition, a citrate supplement may be appropriate for people with very low levels of citrate in their bodies.

Medications can help lower the amount of uric acid in the blood and urine for people who tend to form those types of stones. Struvite stones are associated with infections. In some cases, long-term use of antibiotics in small doses may help keep urine free of bacteria that can cause infection. Medicines can sometimes be used to lower the amount of cystine in the urine for people who have cystine stones.

If you develop larger kidney stones, you may need more invasive treatment. Procedures are available to break up large kidney stones into small pieces that can pass through your urinary tract. For very large stones, surgery is sometimes necessary to remove them.

Right now, the best step is to talk with your doctor about tests that can show what type of kidney stones you have. Once you know that, you can make a plan to help prevent and treat new stones.

— Vincent Canzanello, M.D., Nephrology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

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Tags: kidney stones


July 31st, 2013 · Leave a Comment

Kidney Stones and Summer Liquids: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Admin

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. William Haley tells us that if you're prone to kidney stones, what you drink during the summer is important.

To listen, click the link below.

Kidney Stones and Summer Liquids

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Tags: Haley, kidney stones, Liquids, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, podcast