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July 13th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Kidney Stones/Benefits of Chocolate/High-Tech Anesthesia: Mayo Clinic Radio

By Joel Streed Joel Streed

They're often no larger than a grain of sand ... but they can be extremely painful.Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in your kidneys, and they're more common during the summer months. On this week's program, urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains what causes kidney stones and how they're treated. Also on the show, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses a new study that shows cardiovascular benefits from eating both dark and milk chocolate. And anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel reviews the latest advances in high-techanesthesia.

Here's the podcast:MayoClinicRadio 07-11-15 PODCAST

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Tags: Anesthesia, chocolate, Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Denise Wedel, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, kidney stones, podcast


July 9th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

close-up of bars of dark chocolate

They're often no larger than a grain of sand ... but they can be extremely painful. Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in your kidneys, and they're more common during the summer months. On this week's program, urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains what causes kidney stones and how they're treated. Also on the show, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses a new study that shows cardiovascular benefits from eating both dark and milk chocolate. And anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel reviews the latest advances in high-tech anesthesia.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: There is a kidney stone "belt" in the U.S. where kidney stones are more prevalent.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Click here to listen to the program at 9:05 a.m. CT, Saturday, July 11, and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

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Tags: Anesthesia, Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Denise Wedel, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, heart healthy diet, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio


July 7th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Radio: Kidney Stones/Benefits of Chocolate/High-Tech Anesthesia

By Richard Dietman Richard Dietman

They're often no larger than a grain of sand ... but they can be extremely painful. Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form in your kidneys, and they're more common during the summer months. On this week's program, urologist Dr. Amy Krambeck explains what causes kidney stones and how they're treated. Also on the show, cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky discusses a new study that shows cardiovascular benefits from eating both dark and milk chocolate. And anesthesiologist Dr. Denise Wedel reviews the latest advances in high-tech anesthesia.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: There is a kidney stone "belt" in the U.S. where kidney stones are more prevalent.

Miss the show?  Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio 07-11-15 PODCAST

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

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Tags: Anesthesia, chocolate, Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Denise Wedel, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, general anesthesia, healthy chocolate, Heart Disease, Heart Health, kidney stones, kidneys, Mayo Clinic Radio, Radio


June 15th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

Housecall BannerTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIESKidney stones illustration
Kidney stones
These small, hard deposits that form inside your kidneys can be painful. See if your weight, diet or even the climate you live in puts you at risk.

Weight loss: Ready to change your habits?
Is it finally time to drop those unwanted pounds? Answer these questions to see if you're ready to start a weight-loss plan.

EXPERT ANSWERS
How much exercise do I need to help control my cholesterol?
Regular physical activity can help lower "bad" cholesterol and raise "good" cholesterol. See how often you should get moving.
Shingles vaccine: Can I transmit the vaccine virus to others?
The shingles vaccine uses the live varicella-zoster (chickenpox) virus, but it won't make you infectious to others.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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Tags: breast lump, Cholesterol, Exercise, Healthy recipes, kidney stones, Monday's Housecall, Proton Therapy, shingles vaccine, stress blog, sunburn, swollen knee, Weight Loss


March 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

HousecallBanner1

THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Oral Health: A window to your overall healthdentist inspecting mouth of patient - oral health
Did you know that problems in your mouth can affect the rest of your body? Discover the link between oral health and overall health.

Male Menopause: Myth or reality?
Male menopause is a catchy phrase, but it isn't necessarily accurate. Here's why.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids: Why should my diet include these fats?

Not all dietary fats are unhealthy. Monounsaturated fatty acids are one of the good kinds. See where to find them.

Walking poles: Good for brisk walking?
Walking poles can turn your daily stroll into a full-body workout.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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Tags: Atrial Fibrillation, diabetic macular edema, Flu, Healthy recipes, kidney stones, male menopause, Monday's Housecall, monounsaturated fatty acids, nutrition-wise blog, oral health, walking poles


September 27th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Family history of kidney stones increases risk

By lizatorborg lizatorborg

Kidney stones illustrationDEAR MAYO CLINIC: My family has a history of kidney stones, and I would like to prevent them if possible. What should I do to keep from getting kidney stones? Are there foods or drinks I should avoid?

ANSWER: A family history of kidney stones does increase your risk of developing stones. But you can take a number of steps to help prevent kidney stones from forming. One of the most important is to drink plenty of fluids each day. Making certain dietary choices and staying at a healthy weight also can lower your risk.

Your kidneys filter waste and excess fluid from your blood. That waste and fluid leave your body through urine. Kidney stones form when urine contains more crystal-forming substances —such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid — than the fluid in your urine can dilute. At the same time, due to your genetics or other factors, your urine may not have substances that keep crystals from sticking together. That creates an ideal environment for kidney stones to form.

For people with family members who have had kidney stones, the risk of stones is about twice as high as people that do not have a family history. Other factors that can raise your risk include surgeries that change your digestive process, such as gastric bypass, and diseases that affect your digestion, such as inflammatory bowel disease or chronic diarrhea.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: dehydration, diabetes, Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr. Krambeck, kidney stones, Weekend Wellness


August 11th, 2014

Protected: Downloads for week of 8-11-2014

By Audrey Caseltine Audrey Caseltine

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

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Tags: Dr. Amy Krambeck, Dr. Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio, Radio


August 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Kidney Stones: Mayo Clinic Radio

By Joel Streed Joel Streed

Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?  On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer.  We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D.   Here is the podcast! Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 8-9-14

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Tags: Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio, podcast


August 8th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks Dana Sparks

montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures


Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August? On the next Mayo Clinic Radio show, Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, we'll discuss why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer. We’ll also talk about why kidney stones develop, what to do if you have one and how to prevent kidney stones in the first place.  Our experts guests are nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D. Please join us.

Myth or Matter of Fact: Drinking soda causes kidney stones.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment August 9, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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Tags: Dr Amy Krambeck, Dr Ivan Porter, kidney stones, Mayo Clinic Radio


August 6th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Summer Stones — Kidney Stones in August

By Dana Sparks Dana Sparks

Do you know you're at greater risk to develop kidney stones during the month of August?

Kidney stones affect approximately 3.8 million people in the U.S. each year, the number of cases is on the rise and they are especially more common in the summer. The stones are described as small, hard deposits of mineral and acid salts that form when urine becomes concentrated. The minerals crystallize and stick together, forming a stone which can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball.

illustration of kidney stones

According to Mayo Clinic nephrologist William Haley, M.D., heat, humidity and lack of proper hydration all lead to a higher prevalence of kidney stones in the summer. “The main reason is due to the amount of water we take in and use. Our bodies are made up of mostly water and we use it regularly. But in the heat, we may not be drinking as much as we should, or taking in the right types of fluids, so we become dehydrated, which can lead to more stones.” Dr. Haley adds, "Kidney stones are really very common — up to 13 percent of men, and 6 to 7 percent of women, could get a kidney stone sometime in their life — starting in the twenties and peaking in the fifties." Once you get a kidney stone, you are at risk of getting one again.

Here are tips for avoiding and coping with kidney stones:

  • Hydration is key. Drinking more water is essential.
  • Diet is also very important to prevent stones. Oxalate-rich foods, such as nuts and certain vegetables, coupled with a diet that's high in protein, sodium and sugar, may increase calcium in the kidneys and subsequently raise the risk of kidney stones.
  • Kidney stones may not cause problems until they move into the ureter tube that connects the kidney and bladder. When that occurs, a stone can bring immense pain as it passes through the urinary tract into the bladder. As well, many people can experience an array of symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, blood in their urine or fever. If you experience any of these symptoms, seek immediate medical attention.

Journalists: A video pkg. featuring a patient and separate sound bites with Dr. Haley are available in the downloads. To interview Dr. Haley contact Cindy Weiss, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Tune in this Saturday, August 9 at 9 a.m. CT, for the Mayo Clinic Radio show. We'll discuss further why kidney stones are more prevalent during the summer with nephrologist Ivan Porter, M.D., and urology surgeon Amy Krambeck, M.D..

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Tags: dehydration, Dr William Haley, kidney stones