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September 2nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic, University of North Florida Host Tenth Annual Upbeat Pink: A Musical Tribute to Breast Cancer Survivorship

By Paul Scotti

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Sept. 2, 2014 – Mayo Clinic and the University of North Florida are honoring Upbeat Pink ConcertNational Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October by hosting the tenth annual “Upbeat Pink: A Musical Tribute to Breast Cancer Survivorship” concert on Friday, Oct. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Lazzara Performance Hall, UNF Fine Arts Building on the university’s campus in Jacksonville. The Upbeat Pink concert is free and open to the public.

The theme for this year’s program, “Dancing with the Survivors,” showcases a variety of dance music performed by the UNF Wind Symphony, conducted by Gordon Brock, D.M.A., and features special guest artist and multi-instrumentalist,  Bill Prince, D.M.A.

Guest speakers will include Laura Vallow, M.D., radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic and Dianne Wagner, a local breast cancer survivor.
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September 2nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Family Conflicts, Other Non-Physical Worries Before Cancer Surgery Raise Patients’ Complication Risk

By Sharon Theimer

Meeting non-medical needs ahead of operations can aid recovery, cut health care costs, study suggests

ROCHESTER, Minn. — How well patients recover from cancer surgery may be influenced by more than their medical conditions and the operations themselves. Family conflicts and other non-medical problems may raise their risk of surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study has found. Addressing such quality-of-life issues before an operation may reduce patients’ stress, speed their recoveries and save health care dollars, the research suggests. The study specifically looked at colon cancer patients, and found that patients with a poor quality of life were nearly three times likelier to face serious postoperative complications.Sad girl looking out window

The findings are published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery.

“We know that quality of life is a very complex thing, but we can now measure it and work with it almost like blood pressure,” says lead author Juliane Bingener, M.D., a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We can say, ‘This is good, this is in the normal range, but this one here, that is not good, and maybe we should do something.’”

Quality of life as measured in the study is about more than happiness and how well people feel physically, Dr. Bingener says. It also includes the financial, spiritual, emotional, mental and social aspects of their lives and whether their needs are being met. Read the rest of this entry »

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August 26th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic study examines thoughts on predictive tests for Alzheimer’s

By Admin

PHOENIX — A new Mayo Clinic study examines the question “what would you do if you knew you are predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease?”

The study, which will be published in the October edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, was conducted to measure attitudes concerning Alzheimer’s genetic and biomarker tests. Other studies have shown that many people would want to have tests to know if they carry the gene that causes Alzheimer’s disease. The new study showed that many people may not understand what the results mean.

 

 

“About a third of the people who say they want the testing really don’t know what the implications of the tests are,” says Richard Caselli, M.D., Mayo Clinic neurologist and lead author of the study. “More education is needed before we can advocate widespread predictive testing for a disease which, at this time, we have no effective treatment.” Read the rest of this entry »

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August 25th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Exact Sciences Says Mayo Clinic is First Healthcare System to Offer Cologuard®

By Brian Kilen

Stool-based DNA (sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer to be available by prescription to patients

News Conference Advisory: An audio news conference was held this morning with representatives from Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic.

Click here to listen or right click to download.

Click here for a transcript of the news conference.

MADISON, Wis., and ROCHESTER, Minn., — Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.cologuard

Available by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older who are at average risk for colorectal cancer an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration.

“Cologuard represents a significant advancement in identifying colorectal cancer at its most treatable stage. We believe offering this new tool will promote patient and community public health and may move more patients to get screened earlier—a critical step in beating this prevalent and preventable cancer,” says Vijay Shah, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic gastroenterology and hepatology.

MEDIA CONTACT: Brian Kilen, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads.

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August 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Convenes Thought Leaders to Discuss Transforming Health Care Delivery

By Duska Anastasijevic

CFI Transform logo with many colors
ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation (CFI) will hold Transform 2014, its seventh collaborative symposium focused on redesigning the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 7–9 in Rochester. The symposium draws attendees from around the world looking to connect with colleagues inside and outside the health care industry.

Dozens of thought leaders from a wide array of backgrounds will share ideas and lessons on how to fast-track transformation amidst a rapidly changing environment. Topics include new models of care delivery that have a potential to disrupt the current health care system, the future of virtual health, the shift of the financial burden to the consumers and how to scale programs to large populations.

“We are delighted to welcome back some of the most creative and motivated people in the country to help us transform the way people experience health,” says Douglas Wood, M.D., Medical Director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and the Transform symposium. “I hope that Transform 2014 will arrive to practical solutions to the challenges that health care is facing today, and will reframe the health care conversation with a positive vision. I look forward to the exchange of the ideas.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalist and commentator John Hockenberry will moderate the symposium discussions that include the following speakers: Read the rest of this entry »

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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Investigator to Lead Alliance Research Base for New National, Community-based Cancer Research Initiative

By Joe Dangor

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Jan Buckner, M.D., a five-year, $47.5 million grant to lead the NCI’s National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) research base for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Buckner is deputy director for cancer practice at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, where the Alliance research base will be located.Cancer wordsJan Buckner M.D

NCORP is a national network of cancer investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions and other organizations that provide care to diverse populations in community-based health care practices across the United States. NCORP will design and conduct trials to improve cancer prevention, cancer control, screening and post-treatment management.

The Alliance research base at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Minnesota will be one of seven research bases across the country that will design and conduct multicenter cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research. NCORP hubs will also provide overall administration, data management, scientific leadership and regulatory compliance for the NCORP program.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center to Offer Saturday Morning Injury Clinic

By Bryan Anderson

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center will provide a Saturday morning injury clinic for middle school, high school and college athletes injured during Friday night or Saturday morning sports activities. The clinic will be open each Saturday from Aug. 23 to Oct. 11, from 8 a.m. to noon.

FootballGrass_00010205381_SP FeatureAppointments may be scheduled by calling 507-266-9100, starting at 8 a.m. on Saturday. Walk-ins also are welcome but must arrive by 11 a.m. Appointments will receive priority.

The Saturday morning injury clinic is in the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center’s Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center location. The clinic will be staffed by a physician, physical therapist and athletic trainer. Care options may include X-rays, splinting, bracing, crutch instruction, concussion evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation exercises.

In addition to the injury clinic, Saturday sports medicine offerings include programs for hockey, running, golf, throwers, and any athlete wanting to improve athletic performance.

For more information, contact Chad Eickhoff, athletic training services coordinator, at 507-266-3461 or eickhoff.chad@mayo.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bryan Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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August 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

First in Florida to Receive National Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification

By Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic’s stroke center in Jacksonville is the first center in Florida to receive national Comprehensive Stroke Center certification, joining an elite group of centers throughout the United States that are focused on providing advanced and complex stroke care.

 

 

Centers that achieve this distinction — awarded by The Joint Commission working with the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association — are recognized as leaders that help set the national agenda in highly specialized stroke care. The Joint Commission is the nation's oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care.

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Task Force Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline

By Traci Klein

A Mayo Clinic task force challenges some recommendations in the updated guideline for cholesterol treatment unveiled by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) in 2013. The task force concludes, based on current evidence, that not all patients encouraged to take cholesterol-lowering medications, such as statins, may benefit from them and that the guideline missed some important conditions that might benefit from medication.

Furthermore, the task force believes an emphasis needs to be placed on an individualized treatment approach with each patient and exercising shared decision-making.

heart stethoscopeRecommendations of the task force, made up of Mayo Clinic experts in cardiology, endocrinology and preventive medicine, with no conflicts of interest or links to the drug industry, will be published Aug. 14 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. An editorial will accompany the paper. Mayo Clinic physicians are adopting the task force’s guideline.

“The ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline was last updated in 2001, so it needed to be updated. We agree with many points of the guideline, but there are some key areas where we do not completely agree or we wanted to expand and provide more guidance,” says Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., task force chairman and director of preventive cardiology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Kullo and Dr. Lopez-Jimenez are available in the downloads, as well as animations of statins' effects in the bloodstream and carotid artery plaque formation

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August 14th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Researchers develop strategy to combat genetic ALS, FTD

By Kevin Punsky

Potential biomarker discovered to monitor disease progression, therapy

The C9ORF72 mutation leads to the production of abnormal proteins, referred to as “c9RAN proteins”, that accumulate in neurons and form inclusions. Depicted here are inclusions composed of poly(GP) c9RAN proteins in the cerebellum of a c9FTD/ALS case. In our study, we show that these poly(GP) proteins are also detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of c9ALS patients, suggesting that poly(GP) proteins in CSF may eventually provide a direct means to measure a patient’s response to experimental drugs that block c9RAN protein production.

The C9ORF72 mutation leads to the production of abnormal proteins, referred to as “c9RAN proteins”, that accumulate in neurons and form inclusions. Depicted here are inclusions composed of poly(GP) c9RAN proteins in the cerebellum of a c9FTD/ALS case. In our study, we show that these poly(GP) proteins are also detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of c9ALS patients, suggesting that poly(GP) proteins in CSF may eventually provide a direct means to measure a patient’s response to experimental drugs that block c9RAN protein production.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In the Aug. 14 issue of Neuron, they also report discovery of a potential biomarker to track disease progression and the efficacy of therapies.

The scientists developed a small-molecule drug compound to prevent abnormal cellular processes caused by a mutation in the C9ORF72 gene. The findings come on the heels of previous discoveries by Mayo investigators that the C9ORF72 mutation produces an unusual repetitive genetic sequence that causes the buildup of abnormal RNA in brain cells and spinal cord.

While toxic protein clumps have long been implicated in neurodegeneration, this new strategy takes aim at abnormal RNA, which forms before toxic proteins in C9ORF72-related disorders (c9FTD/ALS). “Our study shows that toxic RNA produced in people with the c9FTD/ALS mutation is indeed a viable drug target,” says the study’s co-senior investigator, Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D., a molecular neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

The compound, which was tested in cell culture models of c9FTD/ALS, bound to and blocked RNA’s ability to interact with other key proteins, thereby preventing the formation of toxic RNA clumps and “c9RAN proteins” that results from a process called repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation.

The researchers also discovered that c9RAN proteins produced by the abnormal RNA can be measured in the spinal fluid of ALS patients. They are now evaluating whether these proteins are also present in spinal fluid of patients diagnosed with FTD. Although ALS primarily affects motor neurons leading to impaired mobility, speech, swallowing, and respiratory function and FTD affects brain regions that support higher cognitive function, some patients have symptoms of both disorders.

“Development of a readily accessible biomarker for the c9FTD/ALS mutation may aid not only diagnosis of these disorders and allow for tracking disease course in patients, but it could provide a more direct way to evaluate the response to experimental treatments,” says co-author Kevin Boylan, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Jacksonville ALS Center, the only ALS Certified Center of Excellence in Florida. Read the rest of this entry »

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