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May 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Play it Safe on Your Bike, Skateboard or In-Line Skates

By Micah Dorfner

people riding bicycles on bike path

LAKE CITY, Minn. — Learning to ride a bicycle is a part of most childhoods in the U.S. More than 70 percent of children between the ages of 5 and 14 ride bicycles, and 55 percent of those children don’t always wear a helmet, according to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. At the same time, in-line skating and skateboarding are also popular.

Next to motor-vehicle injuries, bicycles injure more children any other consumer product, per the National SAFE KIDS Campaign. Head injuries are the most common and often most serious injury sustained on a bike, in-line skates, scooters or skateboards. Wearing a helmet can reduce the risk of death or injury due to a head injury.

“Summer weather promotes great outdoor activities, such as biking and skateboarding,” says Steven Adamson, M.D., Emergency Department director Mayo Clinic Health System in Lake City. “However, bicycle and skateboard injuries are far too common in the Emergency Department. Wearing a helmet and appropriate safety gear along with following safety rules can prevent many injuries. Adults and kids need to take appropriate safety precautions.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Bike Safety, Dr Steven Adamson, Mayo Clinic Health System, News Release, Rollerblading, Skateboarding


May 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Trauma Expert: Preventing Pediatric Falls

By Kelley Luckstein

ROCHESTER, Minn. — When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls.

There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall.

Falls can happen anywhere but some of the most common mechanisms for kids’ falls are from playground equipment, off changing tables, off infant seats placed on high surfaces, from baby walkers, out of shopping carts and out of windows. When children fall out of windows, the injuries that result are more serious than other types of falls.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Tags: childhood falls, Dr Chistopher Moir, Mayo Clinic Children Center, Minnesota news release, News Release, Pediatric Trauma Center


May 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic, Phoenix Children’s Hospital Dog Bite Study Highlighted

By Jim McVeigh

outside Phoenix Children's Hospital with palm trees

PHOENIX — Prior studies have shown that most dog bite injuries result from family dogs. A new study conducted by Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children’s Hospital shed some further light on the nature of these injuries.

The American Veterinary association has designated this week as Dog Bite Prevention Week.

The study, published last month in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, demonstrated that more than 50 percent of the dog bites injuries treated at Phoenix Children’s Hospital came from dogs belonging to an immediate family member.

Phoenix Children's Hospital logoMEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-4222, Email: mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

Stacy Dillier, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 602-933-0824, sdillier@phoenixchildrens.com Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Arizona News Release, dog bites, Erin Garvey, Mayo Clinic Pediatric Surgery, News Release, Ramin Jamshidi


May 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Urologists Present Findings at 2015 American Urological Association 2015 Meeting

By Joe Dangor

AUA annual meeting logo 2015Embargoed Releases. See specific embargo information for each study.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic urologists will present research findings on several topics at the American Urological Association Annual Meeting May 15–19 in New Orleans. Researchers will be available to discuss their research with reporters who are covering the conference. Mayo Clinic studies to be presented include:

Holmium Laser Excision of Genitourinary Mesh Exposure Following Anti-Incontinence Surgery: Minimum Six-Month Follow-up.
Embargoed until Sunday, May 17, 2015 1:00 p.m. CT

The polypropylene mesh implants used in some incontinence surgeries for women can erode tissue and sometimes intrude into the bladder or urethra, often causing pain, bleeding and infection. Conventional treatment requires major open surgery.medical staff person holding chalkboard with the word urology

Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered they can trim mesh with an endoscopic laser and remove it without having to make incisions.

“Removal of mesh with old-fashioned surgery is a big surgery,” says lead author Daniel Elliott, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist. “We were trying to see if there is a way to get this done easier. With certain types of mesh exposures this is very effective and others it’s not. But it presents itself as a potential option for some of these people to avoid a major surgery.” Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: ADHD, AUA 2015 Annual Meeting, BMI, body mass index, Daniel Elliott, Derek Lomas, Jeffrey Karnes, M.D., MD sacral neuromodulation, Marco Moschini, Matthew Tollefson, Mayo Clinic urology, Minnesota news release, News Release, obesity, Prostate Cancer, PSA, robotic-assisted surgery, sarcopenia, Sexual Dysfunction, Urinary Incontinence, Urology


May 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Hospitals Rated High Performing in All Common Care Categories by US News & World Report

By Jim McVeigh

Mayo Plummer Building Reflecting in Gonda Windows

 

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic Hospitals in Rochester, Minn, and Phoenix earned the top-tier High Performing distinction in all five common care categories in the latest ratings by U.S. News & World Report.

U.S. News Best Hospitals for Common Care evaluated how well more than 4,500 hospitals nationwide performed on routine individual procedures and conditions. The five areas of focus are heart bypass surgery, hip replacement, knee replacement, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. Only about 10 percent of the hospitals were rated as high performers in any category.

Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester and Phoenix are among fewer than 50 of more than 800 institutions that rated High Performing in all five categories. Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, earned the High Performing rating in hip replacement. Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wis., is rated High Performing in heart failure.

The ratings placed hospitals into one of five performance tiers, with hospitals that performed consistently well rated highest. The two highest tiers were collapsed to a single “High Performing” tier and the two lowest were collapsed to a “Below Average” tier. Approximately 800 hospitals were rated High Performing in at least one procedure or condition.

MEDIA CONTACT: Ann Schauer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Health System, Minnesota news release, News Release, Paula Santrach, US News & World Report


May 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Campuses Recognized by Practice Greenhealth for Strong Environmental Efforts

By Kelley Luckstein

Logo with two leaves and it says 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald AwardROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic campuses were recently recognized by Practice Greenhealth for its efforts in responsible environmental practices.

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wis., received the 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award for demonstrating superior sustainability programs and cross-functional excellence. A Circles of Excellence award was also received for having shown outstanding performance for commitment to preserving water. In addition to these practices, other sustainability efforts include increasing the use of cooling towers that saved 14.3 million gallons of water; restoring natural prairie habitats on the grounds around buildings to reduce watering needs; 6,400 pounds of carbon dioxide were diverted from the air by conserving energy through efficient lighting, heating and cooling systems; and 11,000 pounds of plastic and 845 pounds of cardboard were diverted from landfills through recycling.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr John Dillon, energy conservation, environmental sustainability, Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Minnesota news release, News Release, Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award, waste reduction


May 19th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Livers Donated after Cardiac Death Safe to Use in Liver Cancer Patients

By Paul Scotti

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Patients with liver cancer can be cured with a liver transplant. But because of the shortage of donated organs, these patients often die waiting for a liver. That’s because most transplant centers predominantly use livers from donors who die from brain death.

But in the largest study of its kind, transplant physicians at Mayo Clinic in Florida have found that liver cancer patients have the same beneficial outcomes using organs donated by patients who died of cardiac death. The study was recently published online in the American Journal of Transplantation.

MEDIA CONTACT: Paul Scotti, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0199, scotti.paul@mayo.edu

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Tags: American Journal of Transplantation, Florida News Release, Kristopher Croome, liver disease, liver transplant, M.D., Mayo Clinic in Florida, News Release, Transplant Center


May 18th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Expert Alert – Precision Medicine and Obesity

By Brian Kilen

Mayo Clinic Researcher Explains Five Individual Categories for Treatment of Obesity

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic researchers have identified five sub-categories of obesity in an effort to determine the most effective, individual treatments. More than two in three adults are considered to be overweight or obese and 17 percent of children are obese in the United States. Obesity is a costly health issue that increases the risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, among others. The prevalence of obesity continues to rise despite education and efforts around diet, exercise, and drug/surgical therapy. In response, researchers asked how the gastrointestinal system affects obesity.

MEDIA CONTACT: Brian Kilen, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Andres Acosta, Gastroenterology, Minnesota news release, News Release, obesity, Precision Medicine, Research, Surgery


May 14th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic: New Mouse Model for ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia Gene Offers Hope for Potential Therapies

By Eileen Pfaff

Pictured are nuclei (blue) of neurons in the ALS/FTD mouse model  showing they contain inclusions of both RNA (left panel, red) or poly(GA) protein (right panel, red) and TDP-43 (both panels, green).

Pictured are nuclei (blue) of neurons in the ALS/FTD mouse model showing they contain inclusions of both RNA (left panel, red) or poly(GA) protein (right panel, red) and TDP-43 (both panels, green).

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have developed a mouse model that exhibits the neuropathological and behavioral features associated with the most common genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which are caused by a mutation in the C9ORF72 gene.

They say their findings, reported today in Science, will speed further research into the molecular mechanism behind these disorders and that the animal model will offer a way to test potential therapeutic agents to halt the death of neurons in the brain and spinal cord.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Petrucelli are available in the downloads.

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Tags: ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Dr Dennis Dickson, Dr Kevin Boylan, Dr Leonard Petrucelli, Dr. Melissa Murray, Dr Rosa Rademakers, Florida News Release, Frontotemporal Dementia, FTD, Mayo Clinic in Florida, Medical Research, News Release


May 14th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Medical School Receives State Licensure For Arizona Branch Campus

By Jim McVeigh

stethoscope and book binding with words health and medical on tableSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona.

“This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education.

While many experts wonder if medical schools across the country are doing enough to prepare graduates for the challenges of an evolving health care system, Dr. Decker notes that the medical school — planned to open in 2017 — won’t rest on conventional physician training.

“The reality is that most medical schools are teaching the same way they did 100 years ago,” Dr. Decker said in a recent Wall Street Journal article. “It’s time to blow up that model and ask, ‘What must we do to train tomorrow’s doctors?’”

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-4222, mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

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Tags: Arizona News Release, ASU, Mayo Medical School, Michele Halyard, News Release, Wyatt Decker