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Items Tagged ‘suicide’

May 1st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

High Fiber Bowl of Cereal with Strawberries, Blueberries and Almonds

Slide show: Guide to a high-fiber diet

Minimally invasive heart surgery

Thinking about suicide? How to stay safe and find treatment

Irritable bowel syndrome

Early-onset Alzheimer's: When symptoms begin before age 65

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April 8th, 2014

Protected: Downloads for Week of 4-07-2014

By Joel Streed

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio, radio, suicide


April 4th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

 Montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures

The next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Saturday, April 5, 9 a.m. CDT, is a rebroadcast from October 2013.

Timothy Lineberry, M.D., and J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., joined us to discuss suicide prevention.  There are an estimated one million suicides worldwide each year, but there is hope that number can drop if we understand the scope of the problem and how to find help.  What should you do if someone you know is at risk? How can you help teenagers if they are suicidal?  We also talked about resources for loved ones who are left behind after suicide and discussed the drastic increase in the number of military members who are dying from suicide. Please tune in.

Myth or Matter of Fact:  Most suicide attempts fail.

To hear the program LIVE on Saturday, click here.
Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.
Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment April 5, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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April 3rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Suicide Prevention (rebroadcast)

By Dana Sparks

The next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Saturday, April 5, 9 a.m. CDT, is a rebroadcast from October 2013.

Timothy Lineberry, M.D., and J. Michael Bostwick, M.D., joined us to discuss suicide prevention.  There are an estimated one million suicides worldwide each year but there is hope that number can drop if we understand the scope of the problem and how to find help.  What should you do if someone you know is at risk? How can you help teenagers if they are suicidal?  We also talked about resources for loved ones who are left behind after suicide and discussed the drastic increase in the number of military members who are dying from suicide. Please tune in.

Myth or Matter of Fact:  Most suicide attempts fail.

Miss the show?  Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio-FullShow-4-05-2014

 

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September 9th, 2013 · Leave a Comment

Common Suicide Myths in Light of World Suicide Prevention Day

By Dana Sparks

Talking to someone about suicide will increase the chances that they will act on it — true or false? False. The truth: When someone is in crisis or depressed, asking if he or she is thinking about suicide can help.

Giving a person an opportunity to open up and share their troubles can help alleviate their pain and open a path to solutions. This is just one of many suicide prevention myths to debunk as we approach World Suicide Prevention Day on Sept. 10.

Read entire news release.

Journalists: To interview Mayo Clinic or American Foundation for Suicide Prevention experts about suicide prevention, contact Nick Hanson at newsbureau@mayo.edu or 507-284-5005.

More myths:

  • Myth: Suicide can’t be prevented. Fact: Suicide is preventable. The majority of people contemplating suicide don’t really want to die. They are seeking an end to intense mental and/or physical pain. Most have a treatable mental illness. Interventions can save lives.
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September 9th, 2013 · Leave a Comment

Join TODAY’s Suicide Prevention Twitter Chat

By Dennis Douda

Thank you for participating in the chat this week. For those who missed it or would like to review the information shared you can read the transcript.

Mayo Clinic, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and USA Today are teaming up for a Twitter chat Monday, Sept. 9 from 1-2 p.m. (EDT).  Follow #suicidechat

Those joining the Twitter chat will include @Mayo Clinic,Dark background and pensive man looking sad
@afspnational@AmerAcadPeds@HarvardHSPH,
@USAToday and USA Today's @LizSzabo.

World Suicide Prevention Day Tuesday, Sept. 10. There were 38,364 suicides in 2010 in the United States, an average of 105 each day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There is one suicide for every 25 attempted suicides, and suicide results in an estimated $34.6 billion in medical and work-loss costs.

Topics to be discussed include: suicide statistics; trends in suicide rates; common suicide myths; what to do if you fear someone is thinking about suicide; best strategies for suicide prevention and the latest in suicide research, including mental illness, treatment options, military suicides, suicide among the LGBT community, bullying and gun restrictions.

Never participated in a chat before, or want tips on how to participate effectively? Watch this video. Questions? Email Nick Hanson at: hanson.nicholas@mayo.edu.

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March 4th, 2013 · Leave a Comment

ADHD Takes a Toll Well Into Adulthood

By Dana Sparks

For children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the first large, population-based study has found that ADHD doesn’t go away and that psychiatric disorders can often develop when they are adults. Lead investigator William Barbaresi, M.D., of Boston Children’s Hospital, who began the study and has a joint appointment at Mayo Clinic, says, “Only 37.5 percent of the children we contacted as adults were free of these really worrisome outcomes. That’s a sobering statistic that speaks to the need to greatly improve the long-term treatment of children with ADHD and provide a mechanism for treating them as adults.”  Mayo Clinic Psychologist Robert C. Colligan, M.D., worked on the research with Dr. Barbaresi and says this study is especially important because of its population size. The findings appear in the online issue of Pediatrics.

Click here for news release

Sound bites with Dr. Colligan are available in the downloads above

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Robert Colligan, Mayo Clinic Psychologist

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February 28th, 2013 · Leave a Comment

ADHD Takes a Toll Well Into Adulthood

By mayonewsreleases

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The first large, population-based study to follow children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder into adulthood shows that ADHD often doesn't go away and that children with ADHD are more likely to have other psychiatric disorders as adults. They also appear more likely to commit suicide and to be incarcerated as adults. The findings appear in the March 4 online issue of Pediatrics.

"Only 37.5 percent of the children we contacted as adults were free of these really worrisome outcomes," says lead investigator William Barbaresi, M.D., of Boston Children's Hospital, who started the study when he was at Mayo. "That's a sobering statistic that speaks to the need to greatly improve the long-term treatment of children with ADHD and provide a mechanism for treating them as adults."

The study is unique because it followed a large group of ADHD patients from childhood to adulthood, says Slavica Katusic, M.D., an epidemiologist and Mayo Clinic's lead researcher on the study.

ADHD is the most common neuro-developmental disorder of childhood, affecting about 7 percent of all children and three times as many boys as girls. Most prior follow-up studies of ADHD have been small and focused on the severe end of the spectrum — such as boys referred to pediatric psychiatric treatment facilities — rather than a cross-section of the ADHD population.

The study followed all children in Rochester who were born between 1976 and 1982, were still in Rochester at age 5 and whose families allowed access to their medical records. That amounted to 5,718 children, including 367 diagnosed with ADHD. Of this group, 232 participated in the follow-up study. About three-quarters received ADHD treatment as children.

At follow-up, the researchers found:

  • 29 percent of children with ADHD still had ADHD as adults.
  • 57 percent of children with ADHD had at least one other psychiatric disorder as adults, as compared with 35 percent of those studied who didn't have childhood ADHD. The most common were substance abuse/dependence, antisocial personality disorder, hypomanic episodeshypomanic episodes, generalized anxiety and major depression.
  • Of the children who still had ADHD as adults, 81 percent had at least one other psychiatric disorder, as compared with 47 percent of those who no longer had ADHD and 35 percent of those without childhood ADHD.
  • Seven of the 367 children with ADHD (1.9 percent) had died by the time the study began, three of them from suicide. Of the 4,946 children without ADHD whose outcomes could be ascertained, 37 children had died, five by suicide.
  • Ten adults who had childhood ADHD (2.7 percent) were incarcerated when the study started.

"We suffer from the misconception that ADHD is just an annoying childhood disorder that's overtreated," Dr. Barbaresi says. "This couldn't be further from the truth. We need to have a chronic disease approach to ADHD as we do for diabetes. The system of care has to be designed for the long haul."

Dr. Barbaresi thinks the study findings may underestimate the bad outcomes of childhood ADHD. Most of those studied were white and middle class, with good educations and access to health care.

"One can argue that this is potentially a best-case scenario," Dr. Barbaresi says. "Outcomes could be worse in socioeconomically challenged populations."

He advises parents of children with ADHD to ensure that their children are in high-quality treatment — and remain in treatment as they enter adolescence. Children also should be assessed for learning disabilities and monitored for conditions associated with ADHD, including substance use, depression and anxiety.

The study was supported by Public Health Service research grants #s MH076111, HD29745 and AG034676. Pilot work for a portion of the project was funded by an investigator-initiated grant from McNeil Consumer and Specialty Pharmaceuticals.

About Boston Children's Hospital

Boston Children's Hospital is home to the world's largest research enterprise based at a pediatric medical center, where its discoveries have benefited both children and adults since 1869. Read more information about research and clinical innovation at Boston Children's.

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September 10th, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Fighting the Battles of Military Suicide

By Dana Sparks

Military suicide is a major public health concern. The suicide rate in the U.S. Army exceeds the rate in the general population, and psychiatric admission is the most common reason for hospitalization in the Army. Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and suicide expert for the Army, Timothy Lineberry, M.D., describes these trends in the September edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Dr. Lineberry says,“Despite the anticipated end of large-scale military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, the affects on the mental health of active-duty service members, reservists and veterans is only just beginning to be felt." In the article, Dr. Lineberry outlines four steps he believes could help curb military suicide:  

  • Reduce access to guns and other means of suicide  
  • Watch for sleep disturbances
  • Prescribe opioid medications carefully and monitor
  • Improve primary care treatment for depression

Read entire news release: Military Suicides

Sound bites with Dr. Lineberry are available in the downloads.

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Timothy Lineberry, Mayo Clinic Psychiatrist

To interview Dr. Lineberry contact:
Nick Hanson
507-284-5005

newsbureau@mayo.edu

 

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Tags: Lineberry, military, Proceedings, suicide


September 10th, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Suicide Prevention Expert Outlines New Steps to Tackle Military Suicide

By Nick Hanson

ROCHESTER, Minn. — September 10, 2012.  The suicide rate in the U.S. Army now exceeds the rate in the general population, and psychiatric admission is now the most common reason for hospitalization in the Army. These concerning trends are described by Timothy Lineberry, M.D., a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and suicide expert for the Army, in the September edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. In the article, he also outlines steps to assess and address military suicide — an issue he calls a major public health concern. Dr. Lineberry proposes greater use of gun locks, improving primary care for depression, and better monitoring for sleep disturbances, among other steps.

suicide word cloud

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video of Dr. Lineberry is available on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

"Despite the anticipated end of large-scale military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, the effects on the mental health of active-duty service members, reservists, and veterans is only just beginning to be felt," Dr. Lineberry says. "Moreover, the potential effect on service members of their war experiences may manifest indefinitely into the future in the form of emerging psychiatric illnesses."

In the article, Dr. Lineberry integrates published research on increased rates of psychiatric illness in the military during the past decade and highlights the need for ongoing resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment. While the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense have already invested millions of dollars into military suicide prevention and research, some key clinical steps can also be taken to tackle the problem.

Dr. Lineberry outlines four steps based on past research and emerging evidence that he believes could help begin curbing military suicide:

  • Reduce access to guns and other means of suicide. Nearly 70 percent of veterans who commit suicide use a gun to do it. Veterans are more likely to own firearms. All veterans with psychiatric illness should be asked about their access to firearms and encouraged to lock up guns, giving someone else the key, or remove them from the home altogether. Just slowing down gun access by a few minutes may be enough to stop the impulse.
  • Watch for sleep disturbances. Complaints of insomnia or other sleep disturbances in otherwise healthy soldiers, reservists, or veterans may signal the need for taking a careful history and screening for depression, substance misuse and post-traumatic stress disorder. Sleep disturbances have been previously identified as a risk factor for suicide. These complaints may also serve as opportunities for referring those potentially needing more intensive treatment.
  • Prescribe opioid medications carefully and monitor. Unintentional overdose deaths, primarily with opioids, now outnumber traffic fatalities in many states. Individuals with psychiatric illness are overrepresented among those receiving prescriptions for opioids and those taking overdoses. This same trend has been seen in former military personnel. A recent study found that Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder who were prescribed opioids were significantly more likely to have opioid-related accidents and overdoses, alcohol and non-opioid drug-related accidents and overdoses, and self-inflicted and violence-related injuries.
  • Improve primary care treatment for depression. Research suggests that patients who die by suicide are more likely to have visited a primary care physician than mental health specialist in the previous month. Programs developed to improve primary care physicians' recognition and treatment of depression could help lower suicide rates.

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