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TUESDAY Q & A: Hospitals always in need of new blood donors

Posted on December 10th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

Young woman in jeans and dark sweatshirt on donor bench, donating blood

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I recently received a call from a local blood donation center asking if I’d be willing to donate. I’d like to help, but I’ve never donated before and I’m nervous about it. I’m not a fan of needles, and I’m afraid I might faint. Also, is there really that big of a need for donated blood on a regular basis?

ANSWER: Donating blood makes a real difference in people’s lives. Hospitals are always in need of new blood donors. Being nervous about blood donation at first is common. But blood donation center staff members are skilled at making the experience as smooth and anxiety-free as possible.

Currently, as few as 3 percent of Americans who are eligible to donate blood actually become donors. That’s a concern because many people in the U.S. need blood every day. Some may need blood during surgery. Others may require blood transfusions after an accident. Still others rely on donated blood because they have a disease that makes it necessary for them to receive red blood cells or other blood components. In some cases, receiving donated blood may be the difference between life and death for these individuals.
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Coughs, Colds and Fevers: When to Take Your Child to the Emergency Department (pkg)

Posted on November 27th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

Runny nosesore throatcough and a fever. Those symptoms are typical of cold and flu season. Most of the time kids who catch a virus get better with treating the symptoms and a little TLC. But how do caregivers know when it’s time to take them to the doctor or even the emergency department? Here’s advice from a pediatric emergency physician at Mayo Clinic.  [TRT 2:02]

Journalists: Broadcast quality video and audio are available in the downloads. 

Click here for a transcript of the video report.  

 

 

Sisters Have Same Breast Cancer Risk But Made Different Decisions (pkg)

Posted on October 23rd, 2013 by Dana Sparks

The risk most women have of getting breast cancer in their lifetime is 12 percent. But if a woman tests positive for one of two known breast cancer genes, that risk shoots up to as high as 80 percent. The sisters in this story both tested positive for a breast cancer gene but chose different ways of responding to the information. That means there are options. Vivien Williams reports. [TRT 1:57 ]

Read script.

Journalists: The video report and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.

 

Preventing Influenza During Pregnancy Could Reduce Autism Risk (pkg)

Posted on October 16th, 2013 by Dennis Douda

Pre-loaded syringes of 2013/2014 flu vaccine.

Expectant moms have yet another good reason to get their flu shot. It may lower their new baby’s risk of autism. "From a public health point of view, this is very exciting news," says Greg Poland, M.D., head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "About 1 in 88 kids or so in the U.S. are getting diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), so this is a major public health issue and the potential benefit is huge." The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says autism has increased tenfold over the past 40 years. So, who wouldn’t roll up their sleeve to lower the risk?  [TRT 1:42]

Journalists: To read a transcript of the video report click here. Additional b-roll is available in the downloads.

REFERENCES:
[1.] Pediatrics, 2012 Dec;130(6):e1447-54. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-1107.
Epub 2012 Nov 12.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23147969
[2.] NIH/National Inst. Of Mental Health   http://www.nimh.nih.gov/news/science-news/2013/flu-in-pregnancy-may-quadruple-childs-risk-for-bipolar-disorder.shtml
[3.] Pediatrics, 2001 May;107(5):E84.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11331734

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bnf-L5fERxM

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Water Sports and Concussions (pkg)

Posted on October 8th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

The risk of concussions in youth sports like football and hockey has been in the spotlight a lot lately. But concussions don’t just happen because of collisions on the gridiron, rink or playing field. They can happen on the water, too.  Experts at Mayo Clinic want to make sure people know that even at slow speeds, a skier, wake boarder or even someone riding behind the boat on an inner tube can get a concussion when they hit the water. [TRT 1:54]

Click here for a transcript of the video report. 

Journalists: Broadcast quality video and audio are available in the downloads.
News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.

 

 

The Longest Marathon … Beating Breast Cancer (pkg)

Posted on October 2nd, 2013 by Dana Sparks

It's one thing to want to tackle a marathon. It's entirely another to train for one while going through treatment for breast cancer.  Dennis Douda introduces us to one such marathon runner for whom the challenge of getting ready was also about getting well.   [TRT 1:33 ]

Read script.

Journalists: The video report and b-roll are available in the downloads. Mayo Clinic News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated into your local reporting. 

Chemo Targets (pkg)

Posted on September 4th, 2013 by Joel Streed

Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer. If caught early, melanoma can be cured. But once it’s spread, the disease can be tough to treat. The good news is that treatments keep getting better. Doctors at Mayo Clinic are using a new surgical technique to deliver high doses of chemo directly to areas that need it without exposing the rest of the body.

Click here for script

Journalists: The video report is available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.

 

How the Body Responds to Blood Loss (pkg)

Posted on September 4th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

It can be a classic occurrence, especially at weddings. A member of the wedding party starts to wobble and sway, then before you know it they’ve fainted and fallen to the floor. A number of factors can contribute to this, the main one being that when you stand rigidly still, blood 'pools' in your legs away from your heart and brain ... so you faint. The same sort of thing happens when accident victims or wounded soldiers lose blood from internal injuries. They’re fine for a moment then they crash. Researchers at Mayo Clinic are teaming up with the U.S. Department of Defense to study the issue in hopes of developing monitoring devices that can eventually save lives.  [TRT 2:17]

Read script: How the body responds to blood loss

Journalists: The video report is available in the downloads, with animation and additional b-roll. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.
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Making the Game Safer With Proper Fitting Helmets (pkg)

Posted on August 21st, 2013 by Dana Sparks

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports up to 170,000 young athletes go to the emergency department every year for possible traumatic brain injuries that include concussion. Many of those concussions happen on football fields. So, Mayo Clinic experts are teaming up with high school coaches to help make it safer for players. They're hosting helmet fitting sessions to teach how athletes’ heads should be properly protected. Vivien Williams reports.  [TRT 2:02]

Read script: Helmet Fitting

Journalists: The video report and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.

Managing Headaches (pkg)

Posted on August 1st, 2013 by Dana Sparks

Headaches are very common. The World Health Organization reports up to three-fourths of all people suffered some sort of headache within the last year. For some they aren't a big deal, but for others they can be debilitating. Experts at Mayo Clinic have tips on how to manage headaches.  Vivien Williams reports.  [TRT 2:02]

Read script: Managing Headaches

The two most common types of headaches are tension headaches and migraines, and to treat them properly, it’s often important to distinguish which one you’re dealing with. Robert Sheeler, M.D., says it’s also important to make sure the headache is not the result of an underlying problem such as an aneurysm, tumor or other serious disease. If you have significant headaches, it’s key to see your health care provider and to get a detailed neurologic evaluation.

Headaches are often not cured, but with proper treatment, patients may greatly reduce the frequency and severity of their headaches and get back into life.

Journalists: The video report and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.
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