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Recovery After Brain Injury: Mayo Clinic Radio

Posted on February 3rd, 2014 by McCray

Miss the show? Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 2-8-2014

From returning war veterans to professional athletes or even a patient with what seems like a simple bump on the head, traumatic brain injury is often misunderstood.  On Saturday, Feb. 8, at 9 a.m. CT, Michael Link, M.D., and Allen Brown, M.D., discussed the definition of traumatic brain injury, explained how the injuries are diagnosed and treated, and described how long it can take to recover.

In the video below, Dr. Brown provides background information about traumatic brain injury.

Myth or Matter of Fact:  It's unusual to fully recover from a traumatic brain injury.

To listen to the program LIVE, click here.

For future topics, click on Upcoming Programs.
To listen to archived shows, click on Episodes.
If there is a topic you would like us to address, drop us a note.  Click here to create a guest account.

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

Posted on August 30th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

 

Mayo Clinic Radio logo & montage of Mayo Clinic photographs

Our Labor Day weekend program (8/31) will feature a rebroadcast of a previous show with Mark Christopherson, M.D., during which we discussed spinal cord injuries.  What happens in a spinal cord injury and what’s the most common cause?  How can a rehabilitation program help?  How close are we to having a cure for spinal cord injuries?  It’s an interesting conversation!  We hope you’ll listen.

Note: You can listen to the program LIVE Saturdays at 9 am CT on I Heart Radio via KROC AM. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates. On Twitter follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines here:        

 

 

Mayo Clinic Radiois a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

 

Fighting Muscle Diseases: #abcDrBchat Tues. Aug. 27, 1 p.m. ET

Posted on August 26th, 2013 by Dana Sparks

Closeup photo of Olympians Bart Connor and Nadia Comaneci

ABC News' Chief Health and Medical Editor, Dr. Richard Besser will moderate a Twitter chat on fighting muscle diseases Tuesday at 1 - 2 pm ET.

The chat will include Olympic gold medal gymnasts Bart Connor and Nadia Comăneci (pictured right), plus Mayo Clinic and other medical institutions.

Here's how to participate in Dr. B's live twitter chat.

Mayo Clinic Offering New “MRI-Safe” Pain-Blocking Device

Posted on August 15th, 2013 by Dennis Douda

Light blue X-ray of spinal cord with the stimulator device inserted and technician hand pointing

Mayo Clinic is now offering chronic pain sufferers a new, implantable pain-blocking device approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) — that is safe for full-body MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, scanners. The device is an advancement on neurostimulation technology that's been is use for decades, but has been denied many patients who would likely need ongoing MRI scans.

Also called spinal cord stimulation, the small, battery-powered transmitters deliver signals through electrical leads implanted along the spinal cord. The signals interfere with pain messages traveling from nerves to the brain. Mayo Clinic pain medicine specialist, Halena Gazelka, M.D., says the devices work extremely well for the majority of people with intractable back, arm and leg pain. But, until now, she's had to tell numerous patients they couldn't use one because MRI scans were more important for managing their medical conditions.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Halena (hah-LEE-nah) Gazelka (gah-ZEL-kah) and b-roll of the device, x-rays and a spinal model are available in the downloads.

Read the rest of this entry »

Education is Key to Pain Medication Safety (pkg)

Posted on June 18th, 2013 by Dennis Douda

Recent upgrades at YouTube have resulted in issues with some older versions of Internet Explorer. If you are only seeing a black box in the player, click here or open in a different browser.

Accidental overdose from prescription pain medication is on the rise. As a matter of fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the number of overdose deaths has gone up 300 percent since 1999. Mayo Clinic's Dr. Christopher Wittich says it's possible to reverse this trend with education. Vivien Williams reports. [TRT 2:11]

Click here for script.

Journalists: Video and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated into your local reporting.

 

Athletes & Baker’s Cysts

Posted on June 14th, 2013 by Dennis Douda

Baker Cyst Knee

Athlete gripping his left knee.

Summertime has many of us getting out and getting more active once again. That means we may see some of the maladies that come with aggressive exercise. Mayo Clinicorthopedic surgeonDiane Dahm, M.D., says a common concern is a Baker's cyst, also known as a popliteal (pop-lih-teel) cyst. It's basically just an out-pouching of fluid on the back of the knee, ranging in size from one to six centimeters or larger. While there can be many causes, Baker's cysts are generally a symptom of some type of injury or arthritis within the knee joint. Dr. Dahm (Dom) says she sees Baker's cysts in the MRI scans of 30 to 40 percent of patients being treated for knee pain, but, they are no cause for alarm.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Dahm are available in the downloads

Recent upgrades at YouTube have resulted in issues with some older versions of Internet Explorer. If you are only seeing a black box in the player, click here, or open in a different browser.

 

Fatigue Factors for Cancer Patients

Posted on December 18th, 2012 by Dana Sparks

Many people who have been through cancer and its treatment have trouble with their recovery because of severe, debilitating fatigue that can last for months or even years. But, according to a recent Mayo Clinic study appearing in Supportive Care in Cancer, even though a variety of treatments exist for cancer-related fatigue, few doctors are recommending them to patients. Study author Andrea Cheville, M.D., says, "Fatigue is a factor that not only significantly diminishes quality of life but also is associated with reduced survival. Our results suggest that cancer patients are not receiving appropriate treatment for a significant and widespread problem." 

Click here for news release

Sound bites with Dr. Cheville are available in the downloads above

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Andrea Cheville, Mayo Clinic PM&R

How to Live with Multiple Sclerosis

Posted on December 12th, 2012 by Dana Sparks

MEDIA ADVISORY:
Mayo Clinic Expert Available to Discuss Long-Term Health for People with MS

For people with multiple sclerosis — as many as 350,000 Americans, and an estimated 200 new diagnoses every week — managing the debilitating symptoms are difficult. A range of medications can help with the fluctuating neurological symptoms like numbness, lack of balance, muscle spasticity, pain and fatigue, but people with MS should get appropriate care for other health needs as well. Kathryn Stolp, M.D., with the Mayo Clinic Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation says, “MS is not always disabling and very seldom life-ending. People with MS can live long, vibrant lives. Their other health needs, beyond MS treatment, should fit into the larger picture of their care.” 

Sound bites with Dr. Stolp are in the downloads above

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Kathryn Stolp, Mayo Clinic PM&R

To interview Dr. Stolp, contact:
Bryan Anderson 

507-284-5005 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

Read the rest of this entry »

Pregnancy and Low Back Pain: New Ultrasound Treatment for Physical Therapy

Posted on November 12th, 2012 by Dana Sparks

Many women experience low back pain during pregnancy. Kathy Cieslak, a physical therapist in Mayo Clinic's Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation says, "Pregnancy-related back pain affects between 50 and 75 percent of all women. Our goal is to identify the potential source of the pain and help women return safely to physical exercise."  So, Mayo Clinic physical therapists are using a rehabilitative ultrasound imaging tool which is radiation-free and allows a patient to see her abdominal muscles during a physical therapy workout. Cieslak says, "We can see which muscles are having trouble contracting, and we can modify the exercises to target specific muscle groups."

Click here for the news release

Sound bites and b-roll are available in the downloads above.

Expert title for broadcast cg: Kathy Cieslak, Mayo Clinic Physical Therapist

To schedule an interview with Kathy Cieslak contact: 
Bryan Anderson 
507-284-5005 
newsbureau@mayo.edu.

Electronic Media Helping Brain Injury Patients

Posted on November 5th, 2012 by Dana Sparks

The road back to health for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is tough and can be even more difficult for those living in remote rural areas. So, Mayo Clinic and collaborators including the Departments of Health in Minnesota and Iowa, Regional Health in South Dakota, and Sanford Health in North Dakota, will be studying and testing new ways to provide specialized TBI care, with a focus on reaching rural areas and underserved urban populations.

Mayo Clinic physiatrist Allen Brown, M.D., director of brain rehabilitation research says, “We know early intervention and longitudinal care give people the best chance to minimize or prevent lasting effects of TBI. We believe this is the first study of this scope — four states, three health systems and two state departments of health — using electronic technology to improve care with no face-to-face contact.”

Read entire news release: TBI   

Sound bites with Dr. Brown are available in the downloads

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Allen Brown, Mayo Clinic Physiatrist