• By Laurel J. Kelly

Housecall: Heart disease in women

February 13, 2017

an ethnically diverse group of womenTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Heart disease in women: Symptoms and risk factors
Heart disease is the most common cause of death in the U.S., but some heart disease symptoms in women may be different from those in men. Discover what puts women at risk and how they can protect themselves.

Norovirus infection: An overview
The highly contagious norovirus has been sweeping across communities this winter, causing severe digestive troubles. Learn how it spreads and what you can do to prevent it.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Super-slow strength training: Does it work?
This method of lifting weights slowly may help prevent boredom in your strength training routine while you challenge your muscles in a new and different way.

Apple cider vinegar for weight loss: Does it work?
Proponents of the apple cider vinegar diet claim that drinking a small amount of apple cider vinegar before meals or taking an apple cider vinegar supplement helps curb appetite and burn fat. However, there's little scientific support for these claims.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Compulsive gambling: Symptoms and causes
Aging: What to expect
Psoriasis and your self-esteem
Flu tracker: Is influenza in your area?

HEALTHY RECIPES
Pan pizza for two
Whole-wheat blueberry pancakes
Rancher's eggs
Artichoke, spinach and white bean dip

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Snoring solution: Sleep on your side
Sleeping on your side may prevent snoring. Lying on your back allows your tongue to fall backward into your throat, which narrows your airway and partially obstructs air flow. To stay off your back, try sleeping in a tight-fitting T-shirt with a tennis ball sewn or attached to the back. This uncomfortable trick will remind you to roll over.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover more healthy lifestyle topics at mayoclinic.org.

NOW BLOGGING
Nutrition-wise: Wearable tech and weight loss
Activity trackers are hugely popular, but do they really help people lose weight? The evidence is mixed.

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