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Started by mayonewsreleases (@mayonewsreleases) · Jun 25, 2013

New Vice Dean is Named for Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus

SCOTTSDALE, AZ — Michele Y. Halyard, M.D, a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, has been named vice dean, Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus. Dr. Halyard will be responsible for undergraduate medical education activities on the Arizona campus and will coordinate Mayo Medical School academic, curricular, and administrative activities and programs in Arizona.

Dr. Halyard's primary focus will be providing Arizona leadership with the support necessary to establish a branch of Mayo Medical School on the Scottsdale campus.

Dr. Halyard earned her M.D. degree from Howard University, where she also completed her residency in radiation oncology. Dr. Halyard completed her fellowship in radiation oncology at Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. She became a consultant in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, in 1989 and went on to chair the department. Dr. Halyard is an associate professor of radiation oncology in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and is board certified in therapeutic radiology. Dr. Halyard has had significant Mayo Clinic leadership experience, including membership on the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors in Arizona and the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees.

Most recently, Dr. Halyard was appointed as an associate medical director for Development in Arizona and she will continue to serve in that role. Dr. Halyard is an accomplished course director in the Mayo School for Continuous Professional Development, a mentor to many residents, medical students and medical professionals and a notable researcher and author.

Mayo Medical School, based on Rochester, Minn., is working with Arizona State University to expand Mayo's medical school to the Phoenix metropolitan area. Students at all Mayo locations will have the option of completing an ASU master's degree in the science of health care delivery as they earn Mayo medical degrees. The master's degrees components include social and behavioral determinants of health, health care policy, health economics, management science, biomedical informatics, systems engineering and value principles of health care.

Mayo Medical School enrolls 50 medical students each year. It received 4,327 applications for those spots last year. The Arizona expansion will allow additional students to enroll. The medical school is integrated with medical practice and research at Mayo Clinic.

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