• By Joel Streed

REM Sleep Disorder Doubles Risk Of Mild Cognitive Impairment/Parkinson’s

March 13, 2012

People with symptoms suggesting (REM) rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, have twice the risk of developing (MCI) mild cognitive impairment  or Parkinson’s disease within four years of diagnosis of the sleep problem,  compared with people without the disorder.       

 “Understanding that certain patients are at greater risk for MCI or Parkinson’s disease will allow for early intervention, which is vital in the case of such disorders that destroy brain cells. Although we are still searching for effective treatments, our best chance of success is to identify and treat these disorders early, before cell death,” says co-author and Mayo Clinic neurologist Brad Boeve, M.D.

  • MCI is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and the more pronounced decline of dementia. It involves problems with memory, language, thinking and judgment that are greater than typical               age-related changes.
  • An estimated 500,000 Americans suffer from Parkinson’s disease, which is characterized by tremor or shakiness, stiffness of the limbs and trunk, slowness of movement, and impaired balance and coordination.

Expert Title: Dr. Brad Boeve, Mayo Clinic Neurologist

Soundbites and patient b-roll in downloads above. 

Click here for entire news release.

The researchers published their findings recently in the Annals of Neurology.  

Please login or become a member to post a comment.