susanashephard

Susana Shephard @susanashephard

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Activity by Susana Shephard @susanashephard

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Jul 25, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Future of Health Care Update

FOHC Banner telemedicine word artIndividualizing Medicine 2014: From Promise to Practice Wait no more for the transition to genomic medicine as we look towards the future of health care. It’s here, and it’s changing the way doctors care for everything from cancer to diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. Learn more at the Individualizing Medicine Conference scheduled for October 6-8 and hosted by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Telemedicine and the Future of Health Care The future of health care is moving towards providing safe, quality care via telemedicine; however, the patchwork of state-by-state medical licensing rules inhibit the delivery of medical services through telemedicine. Patients should not have to take a road trip to access Mayo Clinic’s medical expertise and knowledge.

Modernizing the Clinical Trial System to Meet the Needs of the Patient The future of health care in the United States requires modernization of clinical trial regulations and processes. Sundeep Khosla, M.D., Dean for Clinical and Translational Science, principal investigator and director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS), discusses the path to this reform, which requires study, analysis and policy change on the part of all the stakeholders — government, academic medical centers and private industry.

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Jun 6, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Future of Health Care Update

FOHC BannerApple Mayo appApple Unveils Healthkit and Highlights Mayo Clinic App At the WorldWide Developers Conference (WWDC) 2014 keynote address, Apple unveiled HealthKit, a digital repository for various types of health- and fitness-related data. Apple will also collaborate with Mayo Clinic through a new Mayo app under development that would offer users a more personalized experience and make their health data more actionable in supporting healthier lifestyles.

Mayo Clinic Explores Google Glass The future of health care at Mayo Clinic welcomes Google's new wearable mobile technology, Google Glass — a miniature electronic device incorporated in glasses — that allows users to interact with the internet without using their hands. Approximately 10,000 people have Glass, early adapters who participate in Google's Explorer program. At Mayo Clinic, several physicians and administrators are testing Google Glass across different specialties and departments.  [...]

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May 2, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Future of Health Care Update

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Individualized Medicine ClinicSex-Specific Research in the Future of Health Care

Read more about Virginia Miller, Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Specialized Center of Research on Sex Differences, who has spent her career advocating for the importance of conducting research that is sex-specific. That means that research studies include both men and women, and that the results are analyzed separately by sex.

Implications of Patient Genomic Sequencing

At Mayo Clinic, the future of health care promises individual-driven innovation with patient care designed for your whole body. One way that we're fueling this innovation is through the Center for Individualized Medicine (IM Clinic) which offers genomic testing to patients in order to further personalize care.

Collaborative Teams Building the Future of Health Care

From concept design to custom fabrication, from embedded microprocessors to engraving, the engineering department at Mayo Clinic continues to work with medical professionals to ensure that miracles will continue in the future of health care.
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Apr 11, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Preparing for the Future of Health Care

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Dark space with stars and International Space Station above EarthGrowing Stem Cells in Space to Treat Stroke Patients
Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D., medical and scientific director of the Cell Therapy Laboratory, at Mayo Clinic in Florida, was recently awarded a grant to send human stem cells in space to see if they grow more rapidly in space than stem cells grown on Earth.
Dr. Noseworthy on "Opening Bell with Maria Bartiromo"
John Noseworthy, M.D., President and CEO of Mayo Clinic, discussed the future of health care on "Opening Bell With Maria Bartiromo” along with Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of American Action Former and former Congressional Budget Office director. Dr. Noseworthy explained how we are facing a time of unprecedented change in the health care system and that we are just beginning to take our first steps in this long journey.
Preparing for the Future of Health Care
How does a health care organization prepare for the challenges ahead in the future? John Noseworthy, M.D., CEO and president of Mayo Clinic, shared his perspectives on the Twin Cities Public Television’s (tpt) acclaimed weekly public affairs show, Almanac.
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Mar 21, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Future of Health Care at Mayo Clinic

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myCare app cardiacFuture of Health Care for Heart Patients is a Click Away

Check out the interactive Mayo myCare program, giving heart patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery the opportunity to be an integral part of their recovery.

Future of Health Care at Mayo Clinic

John Noseworthy, M.D., CEO and president at Mayo Clinic, shares his vision for the future of health care in America with Dale Kurschner, editor in chief of the Twin Cities Business.

Individualized Medicine and the Future of Health Care

William Rupp, M.D., vice-president at Mayo Clinic, explains how the Individualized Medicine Clinic in Florida ushers in a new era in medicine where teams of physicians and scientists leverage exciting new technologies like whole genome sequencing to personalize treatment for patients.
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Mar 7, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Mayo Clinic Expands Its Reach in 2013

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Mayo Clinic Care Network 3-06-14A Milestone for the Future of Health Care in Arizona 

The Far East met the Southwest as Mayo Clinic in Arizona employees, benefactors, community leaders, and Hitachi leadership joined together in a traditional Japanese ceremony to welcome the arrival of the first wave of proton beam equipment.

Mayo Clinic Expands Its Reach in 2013

John Noseworthy, M.D., CEO and president at Mayo Clinic, reports that Mayo Clinic reached a record 63 million people in 2013.

Integrated Care: Improving Patient Outcomes and Lowering Costs

Robert Nesse, M.D., vice-president at Mayo Clinic, explains how Mayo Clinic is a leader in the effort to change the health care system and improve the value of the care we deliver to patients.

 

 

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Feb 28, 2014 by @susanashephard · View  

Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Genome

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Personalized Medicine and BiomarkersMayo Clinic's First 150 Years 

John Noseworthy, M.D., CEO and president at Mayo Clinic, discusses how Mayo's first 150 years will shape the future of health care.

Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Genome

At the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, we're gathering  knowledge about a patient’s genome (or DNA) to diagnose, predict, treat and prevent disease.

Optum Labs Welcomes New Partners

Seven leading health care organizations are joining the Optum Labs collaborative, bringing their own unique mix of data and expertise focused on creating the highest value health care possible for patients.

 

 

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Aug 20, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Major Expansion for Cancer Center on Mayo Clinic Campus in Phoenix

A single-site, integrated Cancer Center will be built on the Mayo Clinic's campus in Phoenix. The 217,200-square-foot building expansion will cost $130 million and add 820 new jobs.

Read entire news release. 

A building rendering and sound bites with Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Arizona; William Stone, M.D., Chair, Clinic Practice Committee; and Ruben Mesa, M.D., Deputy Director of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center are available in the downloads below.

 

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Jun 1, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Four-Drug Combo Helps Treat Multiple Myeloma

A four-drug mix of chemotherapy drugs is proving to be highly effective in treatment for patients who are newly diagnosed with the blood cancer multiple myeloma.

The Mayo Clinic-led study shows the multidrug regimen, called CYCLONE (comprised of Cyclophosphamide, Carfilzomib, Thalidomide and Dexamethasone), had strong results in the phase II trial. “Within only four cycles of treatment, 96 percent of patients responded favorably to the therapy,” says lead researcher Joseph Mikhael, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “Furthermore, 75 percent experienced a very good partial remission — meaning there was a 90 percent reduction of their tumor. A third of the patients experienced a complete remission, where the tumor was no longer detectable.”

Dr. Mikhael is presenting the study at an American Society of Clinical Oncology conference in Chicago.

Soundbites with Dr. Mikhael are available in the downloads above.

Expert title for broadcast cg:
Dr. Joseph Mikhael, Mayo Clinic Hematologist

Click here for entire news release.  

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Jun 1, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

New Drug For Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma

It’s the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, and in its advanced stages can become disfiguring and life threatening. For patients with few treatment options, a Mayo Clinic - led study has found that the drug Erivedge (vismodegib) can shrink advanced basal cell carcinoma tumors. The tumors shrank in 43 percent of patients with locally advanced disease and in 30 percent of patients whose disease had spread to other organs.

Lead researcher Aleksandar Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D., a dermatologist and cancer researcher at Mayo Clinic in Arizona says, “This targeted therapy represents a new paradigm in cancer treatment. The findings are very exciting because we haven’t had any therapies before that worked to this degree for advanced basal cell carcinoma.”

Soundbites with Dr. Sekulic are available in the downloads above.

Expert title for broadcast cg:
Dr. Aleksandar Sekulic, Mayo Clinic Dermatologist and Cancer Researcher

Click here for entire news release: DrSekulicNewsRelease2012  

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May 30, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

New Treatment For Dry Eye Symptoms

Blinking should be painless, but for many dry eye sufferers, it hurts and affects everyday activities like driving, using the computer and watching TV.  People with chronic dry eye may have an inadequate protective layer of oils in their tears which can lead them to excessive use of eye drops that can actually worsen the condition. 

Now, there's a new treatment  —  LipiFlow thermal pulsation system  —  being offered at Mayo Clinic in Arizona that diagnoses and addresses the root cause of dry eye  —  obstructed Meibomian glands. Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist, Joanne Shen, M.D., says, "Over time, without lubrication from the Meibomian glands, the tears evaporate repeatedly and can result in more serious eye conditions, such as long-term damage to the surface of the eye."

Soundbites with Dr. Shen and b-roll are available in the downloads above.

Expert title for broadcast: Dr. Joanne Shen, Mayo Clinic Ophthalmologist

Click here for entire news release.  

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Apr 30, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Exercise and Computer Use Can Decrease Chances Of Memory Loss

Your computer has a lot of 'memory' and using the computer, plus exercising, could help you keep your memory. In the May issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings researchers say that combining mentally stimulating activities, like computer use, with moderate exercise can actually decrease your odds of having memory loss. The study examined exercise, computer use and the relationship to neurological risks such as mild cognitive impairment.

Mayo Clinic Neuropsychiatrist and study author, Yonas E. Geda, M.D., MSc, says, "as frequent computer use has becoming increasingly common among all age groups, it is important to examine how it relates to aging and dementia. This adds to the discussion.”

Expert title for broadcast cg: Dr. Yonas Geda, Mayo Clinic Neuropsychiatrist

Soundbites from Dr. Geda are available in the dowloads above.

Click here for entire news release.

  You think your computer has a lot of memory … if you keep using your computer you may, too.

Combining mentally stimulating activities, such as using a computer, with moderate exercise decreases your odds of having memory loss more than computer use or exercise alone, a Mayo Clinic study shows. Previous studies have shown that exercising your body and your mind will help your memory but the new study, published in the May 2012 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reports a synergistic interaction between computer activities and moderate exercise in “protecting” the brain function in people better than 70 years old.

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Apr 2, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Drug Combo Slows Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

The combination of two drugs can slow down the advancement of pancreatic cancer.  Mayo Clinic researchers say the novel drug TH-302 with the standard drug gemcitabine has shown early signs of delaying the worsening of advanced pancreatic cancer in patients.  

According to the results of a multicenter Phase II clinical trial, patients receiving the combination of gemcitabine and TH-302 demonstrated a progression-free survival of 5.6 months compared to 3.6 months in those patients who received gemcitabine alone. The two-month delay in worsening of the cancer is considered significant given that the average survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is only six to seven months.

Lead researcher Mitesh Borad, M.D., is presenting the results today at the American Association of Cancer Researchers  (AACR) annual meeting in Chicago.

Soundbites from Dr. Borad are availiable in the downloads above.

Expert Title:  Dr. Mitesh Borad, Mayo Clinic Oncologist

Click here for entire news release

   

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Mar 30, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Fungal Infection In Southwest Mimics Cancer

Desert soil may harbor a potentially invasive fungus. The fungal infection of the gastrointestinal tract which mimics cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, appears to be emerging in the Southwestern United States and other desert regions.  Mayo Clinic researchers in Arizona are investigating the disease.  The invasive fungus, Basidiobolus ranarum, is typically found in the soil, decaying organic matter and the gastrointestinal tracts of fish, reptiles, amphibians, and bats.

“The exact mode of acquisition of this gastrointestinal infection is unclear, although consumption of contaminated food or dirt is the favored hypothesis,” says lead author H.R. Vikram, M.D., an infectious diseases physician at Mayo Clinic, where seven of the 19 U.S. cases studied were treated.  “The infection is still considered so rare that no one had put together a complete description.” He emphasizes that early recognition is key to successful treatment and that more study needs to be done to determine how this infection is contracted.

Soundbites from Dr. Vikram are availiable in the downloads above.

Expert Title:  Dr. H.R. Vikram, Mayo Clinic Infectious Disease Specialist

Click here for entire news release  

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Mar 23, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Shedding Light on Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Could blocking a testosterone receptor lead to a new way of treating an aggressive form of breast cancer?  Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are exploring this very question. 

Preliminary results of the Mayo Clinic-TGen collaborative study show that the testosterone receptor may be a potential target to attack in treating triple negative breast cancer (TNBC).  

TNBC is highly aggressive and affects approximately 10 to 20 percent of breast cancer patients.  The disease is characterized by larger, faster-growing tumors than other types of breast cancer and has limited treatment options. 

Surgical oncologist and lead researcher Barbara Pockaj, M.D., is presenting these results today at the 65th annual Society of Surgical Oncology conference in Orlando, Fla.

Click here for entire news release.

Soundbites from lead researcher, Barbara Pockaj, M.D., are available in the downloads above.

Expert title:   Barbara Pockaj, M.D., Mayo Clinic Surgical Oncologist  

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Mar 1, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Improving Quality Of Life For Patients With Bone Marrow Disorder

For patients diagnosed with myelofibrosis, a bone marrow disorder that disrupts the body’s normal production of blood cells, new hope may be on the horizon.

A study, published in the March 1 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, found the drug Ruxolitinib was able to effectively improve the quality of life for those with intermediate and advanced forms of this chronic condition and reduce symptoms better than existing therapies.

“These were the largest, randomized clinical trials ever performed for Myelofibrosis and represent a significant benefit over therapies we have used in the past,” said Ruben Mesa, M.D., Chair of the Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an author of the New England Journal of Medicine paper.

In addition to Dr. Mesa, other principal researchers included lead investigator Srdan Verstovsek, M.D. of the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas and Claire Harrison, DM, FRCP of St. Thomas’ Hospital in London, U.K.

Three soundbites from Dr. Mesa, one of the study authors, are available in the downloads above.

Title:  Dr. Ruben Mesa, Mayo Clinic Hematology/Oncology  

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Feb 9, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Marriage is good for your cerebrovascular health - especially for men

Saying "I do" at the altar may have unforeseen health benefits down the road, especially for the groom. Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows that’s true when it comes to seeking care for stroke symptoms.

A Mayo Clinic study, presented at the American Stroke Conference in New Orleans in early February, says that men experiencing a stroke call for emergency help quicker than women, especially if they are married.

“Marriage has long been shown to offer health benefits and often more for men,” said Joyce Lee-Iannotti, M.D., a neurology Fellow at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, and author of the study. “The reasons are unclear, but it’s been postulated that it can be societal roles, where women take on the roles of caregivers and advise their spouses to seek care, often putting their own health behind that of their children and husband.”

For more information, please read the following press release.  

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Jan 12, 2012 by @susanashephard · View  

Living with Cancer: Tackling Challenges Head On

* The downloads above are intended for web use only*

A cancer diagnosis can turn your life upside down. An unknown future, unexpected setbacks and unanswered questions loom ahead for the recently diagnosed patient.  Was my cancer inherited? What's the best treatment for my type of cancer? Should I change my diet? How do I tell my employer? What can I do to improve my quality of life moving forward?

On Saturday, Jan. 14, and Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale, Mayo Clinic experts will be on hand to answer these questions and many more at the "Living with Cancer Symposium for Patients and Their Loved Ones."

The event's message is a simple one: knowledge is power when it comes to dealing with a major health issue. On Saturday, over 500 patients and their family members will become empowered as they gather together to hear from cancer specialists.

"The Living with Cancer Symposium is about fighting back against your disease with knowledge," explains Dr. Ruben Mesa, an internationally-renowned hematologist and chair of Mayo Clinic's Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology. "It's the knowledge about the latest state-of-the-art methods available for the diagnosis and treatment of your disease, as well as knowledge about how to overcome all of the challenges cancer brings to patients, including financial, legal, nutritional, emotional and spiritual issues," Dr. Mesa added.

Patients will also get the chance to ask questions and share experiences coping with their specific cancer diagnosis.  Breakout-sessions covering breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and hematological-based cancers, including leukemias, myeloproliferative disorders, CLL, lymphoma and myeloma will follow the morning session.

Follow our #LivingWithCancer tweets live @mayoclinic and watch for updates on http://www.facebook.com/MayoClinic.

Please see below links for additional information:
Living with Cancer Symposium event details
Mayo Clinic Living with Cancer Blog

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