KelleyLuckstein

Kelley Luckstein @KelleyLuckstein

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Mon, Oct 10 at 4:32pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic added to Wal-Mart’s Centers of Excellence network for spine surgery

normal_spine_16x9_no_labelROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic recently was added to Wal-Mart’s Centers of Excellence network for spine care. Wal-Mart associates will receive a benefit that provides them with access to high-quality, cost-effective care from Mayo Clinic providers — experts in treating complex and rare conditions, including spine problems.

Wal-Mart’s Center of Excellence program provides associates enrolled in the benefits program access to Mayo Clinic and covers the full costs of care, including surgery. The program also covers the costs of travel, lodging and expenses for the patient and a caregiver. Spine care will be available at Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

“We are pleased to be part of this innovative program for Wal-Mart’s associates,” says Charles Rosen, M.D., medical director, Contracting and Payer Relations and transplant surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “We want to provide the best possible care for patients with complex conditions by working closely with employers such as Wal-Mart. This program will expand access to Mayo Clinic and enable patients to benefit from Mayo Clinic expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of spine problems.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Susan Barber Lindquist, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

“Our associates are very important to us, and we want them to receive the right care at the right time,” says Sally Welborn, senior vice president of global benefits at Wal-Mart. “Research, as well as our own internal data, shows about 30 percent of the spinal procedures done today are unnecessary. By utilizing the Centers of Excellence program, we make sure that our associates and their family members are diagnosed correctly, and that they get the best possible treatment.”

This is the latest agreement between Mayo Clinic and Wal-Mart. In 1997, the two organizations began a program for transplant operations and, in 2015, added benefits for breast, lung and colorectal cancers.   The new spine care benefit will begin on Jan. 1, 2017.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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Sat, Oct 8 at 9:34am EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic remembers Sister Generose Gervais

sister-generose-16x9ROCHESTER, Minn. — Sister Generose Gervais, long-time administrator of Saint Marys Hospital and president of the Poverello Foundation, passed away peacefully Friday evening in the hospital she served for many years. She was 97.

Sister Generose will be remembered for her tireless work on behalf of patients and the staff of Saint Marys Hospital. Her hospital ministry focused on perpetuating the Franciscan legacy, specifically nurturing the values of respect, integrity, compassion, healing, teamwork, innovation, excellence and stewardship among all Mayo Clinic staff.

“Sister Generose was known for her faith, her quiet leadership, her wise counsel, her dedication to patients and staff, her sense of humor and the example of service that she lived every day,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “Mayo Clinic was blessed by her presence for more than 60 years.”

A native of Currie, Minnesota, Sister Generose entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Francis in Rochester in 1938 at the age of 18. She trained as a teacher, but her career took a different path when she attended Stout State University in Menomonie, Wisconsin, to study nutrition. After receiving her bachelor’s degree in 1945, she began a dietetics internship at Saint Marys Hospital the same year. In 1954, she received a master’s degree in hospital administration from the University of Minnesota.

In 1971, Sister Generose was named administrator of Saint Marys Hospital. She was the fifth and final Franciscan Sister to hold that post in the hospital that has been built by the Sisters of Saint Francis in concert with Dr. W. W. Mayo in 1889.

During Sister Generose’s time as administrator, the hospital saw significant growth. She oversaw the construction of the Mary Brigh Building, which included 40 new operating rooms, 130 beds, two intensive care units, an enlarged Emergency/Trauma Unit and a parking ramp. At that time, the new building was the largest single hospital building project in Minnesota. Following the completion of the building, Sister Generose was named to the new position of executive director of Saint Marys Hospital.

As a leader of Saint Marys Hospital, Sister Generose was said to be as comfortable with the complexities of blueprints as she was with making jellies and pickles, one of her favorite pastimes. Her business acumen was clearly demonstrated as she served on numerous boards, including Franciscan Health System, the American Hospital Association and the Catholic Health Association. In 1979, she was the first female member of the board of directors for the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

Always concerned about patient needs, Sister Generose started the Poverello Foundation, a ministry to help patients of Saint Marys Hospital cope with medical expenses. The foundation has contributed more than $1 million annually to help patients and has assisted nearly 13,000 people since its inception in 1983. Sister Generose was the “face” of the foundation, working diligently on the annual fundraiser where the most sought-after items were her jams, jellies and pickles.

“She was a mentor, a friend and a sister. She loved her faith, her religious community, her family and her ministry of healing at Saint Marys. She showed that love through her generous spirit, her sense of humor and love,” says Sister Lauren Weinandt, who worked with Sister Generose for many years and organized the annual Sister Sale. “She served on so many boards and organizations, but her pleasures were simple. She enjoyed life, a cup of cappuccino and a cookie, peanut M&Ms, a Twins game and a good joke in the afternoon.”

Sister Generose stepped down from her formal leadership position in 1985 but remained present and involved in the hospital. She was instrumental in the integration of Saint Marys Hospital with Mayo Clinic in 1986, and helped to create a sponsorship board to promote and preserve the founders’ values and the Catholic identity of the hospital. In 1993, Mayo Clinic honored Sister Generose by naming its new mental health care facility on the Saint Marys campus after her. In 2011, she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Catholic Health Association of the United States for leadership that extended beyond the local community and served to inspire others.

Until her death, Sister Generose continued to travel the hallways of Saint Marys Hospital, providing compassionate service to patients and their families and remaining active in hospital activities. A popular speaker and teacher at Mayo Clinic, she often said “Values are caught, not taught.”

“Her door was always open, and anyone who passed by and wanted to stop and visit (and so many did) was always welcome … And you never left that office without receiving her blessing,” says Sister Tierney Trueman, coordinator of the Mayo Clinic Values Council. “In her warm and welcoming hospitality, she was the embodiment of our Mayo/Franciscan values of respect — treat everyone in our diverse community with dignity.”

Sister Generose mentored her family of Mayo Clinic staff and exhorted them to live Mayo Clinic's primary value: the needs of the patient come first.  She often would reference St. Francis to make her point. “I tell the staff what the beggar told St. Francis — ‘Be sure that thou are as good as the people believe thee to be, for they have great faith in thee,’” she said.

“Sister Generose was honest and firm, gentle, caring and compassionate. She demanded the same integrity and excellence from others that she consistently modeled in herself,” says Sister Tierney. “Her empty office echoes the message Francis left his followers: "I have done what is mine to do, may God give you the strength to do what is yours."

Sister Generose told those close to her that the best way to remember her was “through gifts to the Poverello fund or your good works.”

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

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Thu, Sep 29 at 9:12am EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Ovarian removal to prevent ovarian cancer should not be an option for most premenopausal women, Mayo research finds

Illustration of the female reproductive system -- fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, cervix, vaginal canalROCHESTER, Minn. – A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. The study showed that women under 46 who had both ovaries removed experienced a significantly elevated risk of multiple chronic health conditions that included depression, hyperlipidemia, cardiac arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, arthritis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and osteoporosis.

Bilateral oophorectomy is the formal term for removal of both ovaries, often used as a preventive measure against ovarian cancer. For the first time, the team of nine Mayo researchers from multiple disciplines linked bilateral oophorectomy to a marked increase in 8 of the 18 chronic health conditions that were measured.

“This study provides new and stronger evidence against the use of bilateral oophorectomy for prevention in young women,” says Walter Rocca, M.D., lead author of the study. “Bilateral oophorectomy should not be considered an ethically acceptable option for the prevention of ovarian cancer in the majority of women who do not carry a high-risk genetic variant.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings followed two groups of women for a period of approximately 14 years. There were 1,653 women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy and an equal number of women of the same age who did not. The study was made possible by using the records linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project.

Results showed that women under 46 who underwent bilateral oophorectomy experienced a higher incidence of the 18 chronic conditions considered one at a time, except cancer, and an accelerated rate of accumulation of combined conditions, or multimorbidity. Estrogen therapy reduced some of the risk in women who had undergone the procedure.

The investigators suggest that the premature loss of estrogen caused by the oophorectomy may affect a series of aging mechanisms at the cellular and tissue level across the whole body leading to diseases in multiple systems and organs. In summary, the effects of oophorectomy in premenopausal women are much broader and more severe than previously documented.

“The clinical recommendation is simple and clear,” Dr. Rocca concludes. “In the absence of a documented high-risk genetic variant, bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years (or before menopause) is never to be considered and should not be offered as an option to women.”

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Wed, Sep 21 at 3:00pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic remembers William Eugene Mayberry, M.D., former Mayo Clinic CEO

Male sitting at a dark wood desk looking toward the viewer dressed in a pinstriped suit, with his hand near his chin

ROCHESTER, Minn. — William Eugene Mayberry, M.D., a distinguished Mayo Clinic physician, research scientist and administrator, passed away on Sept. 18 in Rochester, Minnesota. He was 87.

“Dr. Mayberry was an outstanding physician scientist who cared deeply for his patients and the staff and employees of Mayo Clinic,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president & CEO, Mayo Clinic. “His pioneering leadership brought forth great change and was vital in shaping Mayo Clinic as a destination for patients from across the nation and around the world. He will long be remembered as one of the great leaders in Mayo Clinic history.”

Dr. Mayberry served as president, CEO and chairman of the Board of Governors of Mayo Clinic from 1976 to 1987. He led Mayo Clinic through a period marked by significant change, and, to quote Dr. Mayberry, “Through change, we move forward. It’s how we grow. Discomfort with change is only to be expected. With time, we realize that, on the whole, change has been marvelously good for Mayo.”

Those words reflect the momentous developments that took place during his leadership:

  • Leading the establishment of Mayo Clinic sites in Arizona and Florida
  • Integrating Mayo Clinic with Saint Marys and Rochester Methodist hospitals
  • Championing early efforts in diversity
  • Expanding development activities to support Mayo Clinic’s mission in clinical practice, education and research

“Dr. Mayberry’s warm personality and kind demeanor made him a highly approachable, well-liked and respected leader,” says Dr. Noseworthy.

Dr. Mayberry was a Tennessee native who graduated from Tennessee Technological University in 1947 and the University of Tennessee School of Medicine in 1953. He served in the U.S. Navy’s Underwater Demolition Team for two years before beginning postgraduate work in endocrinology. His research interest was in thyroid function, and he continued his studies at Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Minnesota, New England Center Hospital, and the National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

He joined the Mayo Clinic staff in 1960 as a consultant in medicine and spent most of his 36-year career at Mayo. He served as the chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine from 1970 to 1975 and was professor of laboratory medicine and professor of medicine at Mayo Medical School.

In addition to his work at Mayo, he was a member of several medical and administrative professional associations, and served on many civic boards. He retired on June 30, 1992.

Dr. Mayberry is survived by his daughter, Ann Mayberry, of Chicago; his son, Paul Mayberry, of Atlanta; and six grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Jane, and his brother, Thomas.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, Sep 8 at 4:01pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Employees of medical centers report high stress and negative health behaviors

middle aged business woman at desk with headacheROCHESTER, Minn. — Several national surveys have found that approximately 15 to 20 percent of adults in the U.S. will report high levels of stress. A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers identified stress and burnout as a major problem employees face within the medical industry, leading to negative health behaviors. With rising stress levels in the workplace for employees, many companies are looking to integrate, engage and enroll employees into wellness programs.

“It’s important to teach individuals to monitor their stress levels over time and practice effective, ongoing stress-reduction strategies, such as getting involved in wellness programs, this will in-turn help health care employees live a happy and health life,” says Matthew Clark, Ph.D., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.

The study, which is published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, measured stress and health behaviors (exercise, nutrition, sleep, etc.) by a series of five annual surveys administered to 676 participants who are employees at Mayo Clinic and have access to a wellness center. A significant relationship was found between the stress levels of an employee and four domains of quality of life: poor physical health, low mental health, poor nutritional habits and lower perceived overall health. Unfortunately, according to the study, employees who reported high stress levels and perceived poor quality of life also reported the lowest usage of wellness programs.

According to Dr. Clark, “Increasing the awareness of wellness centers and programs in academic medical environments will increase the quality of life of employees and lead to less physician and staff burnout.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

exercise class of men and women doing core workout training

Many companies are taking note of burnout and job strain in their staff and have created wellness centers, offer stress reduction programs, provide wellness coaching and healthy sleep programs for their employees in an effort to reduce stress, job strain and burnout. Muscular strength, cardiovascular fitness and flexibility exercises are also beneficial to overall quality of life, Dr. Clark writes.

He adds, “We are beginning to encourage employees to monitor their stress levels and to engage in daily resiliency practices, such as exercise, time with family and friends, meditation or gratitude journaling, to help reduce their stress levels and improve their quality of life.”

Given the significance of stress in the workplace, the researchers note that exploring ways to effectively engage employees who have high levels of stress into wellness programs warrants further investigation.

Other authors of this study include:
Sarah Jenkins, Mayo Clinic
Philip Hagen, M.D., Mayo Clinic
Beth Riley, Mayo Clinic
Caleigh Erikson, StayWell
Amy Heath, Mayo Clinic
Kristin Vickers Douglas, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
Brooke Werneberg, Mayo Clinic
Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., Mayo Clinic
Amit Sood, M.D., Mayo Clinic
Roberto Benzo, M.D., Mayo Clinic
Kerry Olsen, M.D., Mayo Clinic

This research was supported in part by grants to Dr. Benzo from the National Institutes of Health (NIH; R01 CA 163293 and R01 HL 94680).

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

edharrold

Ed Harrold responded Mon, Sep 12 at 7:33pm EST · View

We are so thrilled to be partnered with GWU School of Medicine & Health Sciences to provide a CME training that provides physicians with the educations and skills in mind/body medicine to reduce stress, build resiliency, improve cognitive performance, manage emotions through self-regulation strategies and so much more. It's time to heal the healers. Physician wellness leads to physician well-being. Go BE Great

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KelleyLuckstein

Wed, Jul 20 at 2:29pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Wellness Coaching Can Produce Significant and Long-term Improvements in Health Behaviors

wellness coach and patient consulting with each other

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Making a lifestyle change can be a daunting task, as an overwhelming amount of popular health trends seem unsustainable at best and, at worst, could be dangerous. However, promising results of a study conducted by Mayo Clinic experts suggests that one of these latest trends ─ wellness coaching  ─ can produce substantial lifestyle improvements that align with an individual’s personal values and foster confidence to sustain these changes after the program has concluded.

Wellness coaches are trained professionals who help individuals identify values and make customized changes to manage stress, begin or maintain healthy habits and improve their overall quality of life. One of the reasons wellness coaching can be successful is that the focus isn’t necessarily on weight management or fitness. People usually begin wellness programs to lose weight, but, according to Matthew Clark, Ph. D., L.P., the study’s lead author and medical expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, what often begins as a short-term goal evolves into clinically meaningful improvements, such as stress reduction, sleep improvement, increased spiritual connection and quality of life that is sustained long after the wellness program has been completed.

This study, which is published in The American Journal of Health Promotion, examines data from three main areas of wellness coaching: health behaviors, eating self-efficacy and goal-setting skills. Researchers asked 100 participants to evaluate themselves based on these criteria at the beginning of the program, after the standard 12 weeks were completed and three months following the last appointment. In all three areas, individuals reported statistically significant improvement and maintained self-perception of these improvements during the three-month period following.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The research from the study, conducted at the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, is being used for ongoing program planning at the clinic’s own Healthy Living Program – a comprehensive wellness program led by certified wellness experts. Dr. Clark offers this advice for people looking to make a lifestyle change: “If you’re looking to improve your quality of life ─ if you’re trying to make healthier changes ─ and it’s been difficult to do that on your own, be receptive to working with a wellness coach. That person can provide you with guidance, look at your strengths and help you build confidence and skills for long-term change.”

To contact the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program for more information, go to https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

About the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program
The Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is redefining healthy living. It’s a comprehensive, whole-body wellness experience guided by medical research and evidence-based medicine to offer guests trusted solutions to improve quality of life. The program is research-driven around diet, exercise and resiliency, and, when all of these are connected, they encompass the power needed to make sustainable changes. Wellness coaches work with individuals to design comprehensive, personalized wellness plans based on goals and expectations. Ongoing support is offered to ensure continued success and sustainability once guests return home. Cooking demonstrations, physical activities, resiliency experiences and spa services are available to guests, patients and family members through our a la carte menu. Located in Rochester, Minnesota, the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is close to a local airport and is within a 75-minute drive of Minneapolis. For more information, visit https://healthyliving.mayoclinic.org/.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Fri, Jun 17 at 1:47pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Millennials Rank Mayo Clinic as Top-20 Most Desired Employer

group of smiling teenagersCareers in health care are on the minds of young people, according to the National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS) Millennial Career Survey. The majority of the findings, which demonstrate the opinions of 13,000 NSHSS members, point to medicine and health as the most desired field, earning 41 percent of the top votes.

Though Minnesota-based technology and manufacturing company 3M made the No. 1 spot, the health sector commanded a large portion of the survey responses by earning a third of the top 15 positions. Mayo Clinic proved to be popular in the job aspirations of the surveyed millennials, who collectively ranked Mayo as No. 13 from a pool of 200 companies. The results found Mayo Clinic to be even more popular in 2016, moving up a spot from No. 14 in 2015. Forbes reports that the survey, conducted by Hanover Research, demonstrates a reflection of industries’ greater outreach to young people, something 3M has done extensively.

According to the survey, the health care field has been able to make that connection as well. The 2016 NSHSS survey results displayed a maintained interest in health care— with all of the 2015 top-25 health employers holding steady at the top. Institutions including Health Care Service Corp., Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital joined Mayo Clinic as leaders in the survey responses. Local hospitals also earned a place at No. 5.

The high presence of health industries in the rankings is a trend that has maintained during the survey’s nine years.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelly Reller, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284 5005, [email protected]

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, May 26 at 12:54pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Weight Gain in Children Associated With Low Hormone Levels

side view of an overweight womanROCHESTER, Minn. — A Mayo Clinic-led study found that obese teenagers have lower levels of a hormone potentially tied to weight management than teens of normal weights. The study is published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

“Our study is the first to look at levels of spexin in the pediatric population,” says Seema Kumar, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, one of the study’s authors. “Previous research has found reduced levels of this hormone in adults with obesity. Overall, our findings suggest spexin may play a role in weight gain, beginning at an early age.”

For children and teens, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines obesity as having a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and sex.

Obesity affects about 17 percent of U.S. children, according to the Endocrine Society’s “Endocrine Facts and Figures Report.” Childhood obesity is associated with an estimated $14.1 billion in additional prescription drug, emergency department visit and outpatient visit costs each year.

The cross-sectional study analyzed spexin levels in 51 obese and 18 teenagers of normal weights between ages 12 and 18. The participants had blood samples taken between 2008 and 2010 as part of separate clinical trials. Researchers tested the blood samples to measure spexin levels.

Researchers divided the teenagers into four groups based on their spexin levels. Among the participants with the lowest levels of spexin, the odds of having obesity were 5¼ times higher than in the group with the highest levels of the hormone. Unlike what has been noted in adults, there was no association between spexin levels and fasting glucose.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284 5005, [email protected]

“It is noteworthy that we see such clear differences in spexin levels between obese and normal weight adolescents,” Kumar says. “Since this is a cross-sectional study, more research is needed to explore the physiological significance of spexin, how it may be involved in the development of childhood obesity, and whether it can be used to treat or manage the condition.”

Other authors of the study are:

  • Jobayer Hossain, Ph.D., Nemours Biomedical Research
  • Nicole Nader, M.D., Park Nicollet Health Services
  • Roxana Aguirre Castaneda, M.D., University of Illinois College of Medicine
  • Swetha Sriram, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Babu Balagopal, Ph.D., Nemours Children’s Specialty Care and Mayo Clinic

This research was supported by Mayo Clinic Center for Translational Science Activities (CTSA)  Grant No. UL1 TR000135 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Fri, May 20 at 3:10pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic, Global Bridges to Host Global Tobacco Dependence Treatment Summit

a person puffing and smoking an e-cigarette

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the majority of the world’s 1 billion smokers want to quit. Though tobacco dependence treatment has the greatest short-term impact on tobacco-related mortality of any intervention, it remains the least-funded and least-implemented tobacco control measure globally.

Health care professionals are crucial to changing this, say the organizers of the Global Tobacco Dependence Treatment Summit 2016, which will take place May 23-24 on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota. Mayo Clinic’s Nicotine Dependence Center and the Global Bridges Healthcare Alliance are bringing together world public health leaders, researchers, advocates and health care providers to advance culturally relevant treatment of tobacco dependence around the globe and discuss the impact of health care professional advocacy on tobacco control.

Unless action is taken, tobacco use will kill 1 billion people this century, according to WHO. Six years since the adoption of WHO guidelines calling for integration of cessation treatment into tobacco control, only 12 percent of countries have developed comprehensive treatment services. Even so, there are steps health care professionals can take to improve patients’ chances of quitting, including refraining from tobacco use, identifying tobacco users at intake, and offering brief advice.Logo with the words Global Bridges Healthcare Alliance for Tobacco Dependence Treatement

“Helping people quit tobacco saves lives. As health care professionals, we have a moral responsibility to patients around the world to make tobacco dependence treatment available, accessible and culturally sensitive,” said J. Taylor Hays, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center and chair of Global Bridges. “People who want to quit need to know providers are there for them at every step of the journey toward living free from tobacco.”

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Sarah Dick, JPA Health Communications, 202-591-4050, [email protected]

Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

Speakers and events at the Global Summit 2016 will include:

  • Emerging Evidence on Harm Reduction and E-cigarettes
    Cliff Douglas, J.D., director of the American Cancer Society Center for Tobacco Control, will chair this evening plenary discussion with:

    • Mitch Zeller, J.D., director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products
    • Dorothy K. Hatsukami, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota
    • Scott Leischow, Ph.D., professor of Health Services Research, Mayo Clinic
    • Constantine Vardavas, M.D., School of Medicine, University of Crete
    • Feras Hawari, M.D., FCCP, chief of Pulmonary and Critical Care, King Hussein Cancer Center
  • National Treatment Guidelines Development and Implementation
    This session, presented by Martin Raw, Ph.D., director of the International Centre for Tobacco Cessation, will address the implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control guidelines on tobacco dependence treatment. Dr. Raw will be joined by:

    • Dongbo Fu, M.D., technical officer for Tobacco Cessation, WHO Tobacco-Free Initiative
    • Michael Fiore, M.D., director of the Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin
  • Effecting Policy Change Through Physician and Health Care Professional Advocacy
    This panel discussion will be chaired by Richard D. Hurt, M.D., emeritus Mayo Clinic physician and former medical director of the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, Dr. Hurt will discuss the role of health care professionals in tobacco control advocacy and review successful national advocacy examples with:

    • Eduardo Bianco, M.D., cardiologist, tobacco dependence treatment specialist and president of the Tobacco Epidemic Research Center of Uruguay
    • Carlos A. Jimenez-Ruiz, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the Tobacco Control Committee of the European Respiratory Society
    • Yolonda C. Richardson, J.D., M.P.H., executive vice president, Global Campaigns, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids 
  • “Tobacco Dependence Treatment Patient Panel”
    Barbara Dallavalle, M.A., C.T.T.S., will facilitate a panel discussion with three patients who have been treated for tobacco dependence at the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center.  The patients will share their struggle with tobacco addiction, the experiences with treatment that supported their success, and the benefits they now enjoy as a result of living tobacco-free.

For a complete list of speakers, presentations and experiences, go to https://tobaccotreatmentsummit.mayo.edu/speakers/

About Global Bridges
Global Bridges connects and mobilizes an international network of health care professionals and organizations dedicated to advancing effective tobacco dependence treatment and advocating for proven tobacco control policies. Since its inception in 2010, Global Bridges grantees and partners have created culturally relevant training curricula based on established best practices and trained more than 3,600 health care professionals from 63 countries. In partnership with funders, such as Pfizer Independent Grants for Learning and Change, Global Bridges offers competitive grant funding and guidance for evidence-based training. The Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center and the American Cancer Society, founding partners of Global Bridges, provide programmatic support.

Note: WHO’s official smoking statistics and report on the WHO Tobacco Free Initiative “MPOWER” measures for country-level implementation of WHO FCTC guidelines can be accessed on the organization's website.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

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KelleyLuckstein

Fri, May 20 at 12:57pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Three Mayo Clinic Campuses Recognized by Practice Greenhealth for Environmental Efforts

2016 Practice Greenhealth Emerald AwardROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic campuses in Florida, Minnesota and Wisconsin have been awarded for their sustainability efforts by Practice Greenhealth, a national organization dedicated to reducing the impact health care institutions have on the environment.

Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota, and Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, each received the 2016 Greenhealth Emerald Award for demonstrating superior sustainability programs. Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, earned the Partner for Change Award for continuously improving and expanding upon its efforts to eliminate mercury, reduce waste, recycle and lessen its impact on the environment. Eau Claire also was recognized for its efforts to reduce the environmental impact of surgical procedures in operating rooms with a Greening the OR Initiative Award.

The Mayo Clinic Green Advisory Council leads the environmental efforts that develop and encourage improvements to conserve energy, ensure a more environmentally responsible supply chain, reduce the waste stream, construct and operate facilities for long-term efficiency and participate with industry and educational leaders in sustainability.

“Mayo Clinic’s campuses, collectively, have made significant improvements in waste stream diversion, energy management and water conservation in recent years,” says Henry Tazelaar, M.D., chair of the Mayo Clinic Green Advisory Council. “In total, these efforts are estimated to save Mayo Clinic more than $6 million annually through more efficient operations.

Examples of recent Mayo Clinic efforts include:

  • Renovating existing facilities to enhance energy conservation
  • Investing in more energy-efficient equipment
  • Improving metering systems to identify energy and water conservation opportunities
  • Expanding recycling and equipment reuse efforts

“We are proud to be recognized for our efforts and congratulate the campuses for their achievements,” Dr. Tazelaar says. “We are all looking for opportunities to do even better with continued collaboration.”

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

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Fri, Apr 1 at 3:46pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Program to Present Ethan Bortnick in Concert

Image of Ethan Bortnick playing pianoROCHESTER, Minn. — Ethan Bortnick, a 15-year-old pianist, will play at the Mayo Civic Center. Bortnick has performed around the world raising money for charities and will donate a percentage of the event proceeds to the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) in Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine. HLHS is a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of a child's heart is severely underdeveloped.

Bortnick and his family have participated in the research taking place at Mayo Clinic, as Bortnick’s younger brother, Nathan, has HLHS. The concert will raise HLHS awareness and connect those in the HLHS community to share experiences, while discovering the regenerative therapies being pioneered for congenital heart disease.

For more details on the concert, visit Mayo Clinic’s HLHS blog.

WHERE: Mayo Civic Center, 30 Civic Center Drive SE, Rochester.

WHEN: Sunday, April 10, 3 p.m. CDT

WHO: Interviews are available with Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director, Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS, and Bortnick.

MEDIA CONTACT: RSVP to Susan Barber Lindquist, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

About the Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS
The Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for HLHS is a collaborative network of specialists bonded by the vision of delaying or preventing heart failure for individuals affected by congenital heart defects, including HLHS. The specialized team is addressing the various aspects of these defects by using research and clinical strategies ranging from basic science to diagnostic imaging to regenerative therapies.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, Mar 10 at 11:26am EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic to Host High School ‘Saving Lives with Gus’ Medical Seminar

Researcher and student in labROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will host a hands-on medical seminar for local high school students on Monday, March 14.

WHO: David Farley, M.D., general surgeon at Mayo Clinic; nearly 125 high school students from Rochester, La Crescent, Minnesota, and Forest City, Iowa.

WHAT: A video series called “Saving Lives with Gus” was created by a team of surgical residents and simulation medicine fellows at Mayo Clinic to teach the general public simple things that can be done do to save lives. As an extension, the residents and fellows have created this seminar for high school students to get early exposure to the medical field. The students will have an opportunity to perform CPR on mannequins, use a defibrillator, perform an ultrasound and test their knot tying skills on a simulated vessel, along with many more opportunities.

“We hope it is a great opportunity for high school students to get hands-on experience with a variety of medical interventions,” says Dr. Farley. “In an ideal scenario, this effort helps save a life in the future and better informs and stimulates young learners to consider medicine as a potential career.”

WHERE: Phillips Hall, Siebens 1, Mayo Clinic, 100 Second Ave. SW, Rochester.

WHEN: Monday, March 14, 9 a.m. CDT.

Reporters should arrive by 8:50 a.m. CDT at the Information Desk, Gonda Lobby.

NOTE: Members of the media must RSVP to Kelley Luckstein, Public Affairs, at 507-284-5005.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, Mar 3 at 9:05am EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic Ranked 86 on Fortune's ‘100 Best Companies to Work For’ List

collage of Mayo Clinic patients and employees

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Fortune named Mayo Clinic to its 2016 list of the “100 Best Companies to Work For,” ranking it No. 86. This is Mayo’s 13th consecutive year on the list, which recognizes companies that rate highly with employees.

“Each of our employees contributes to Mayo Clinic’s recognition as one of the nation’s 100 Best Companies to work for,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “We are honored to receive this recognition and congratulate our employees for their commitment to excellence.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

Each year, hundreds of companies go through a competitive selection process vying for a place on Fortune’s list. The Great Place to Work Institute administers this process, which includes a survey of randomly selected employees and an in-depth questionnaire about their programs and company practices.

Great Place to Work evaluates companies based on five dimensions its research indicates are key to building great workplaces: credibility, respect, fairness, pride and camaraderie.

To see the complete 2016 Fortune “100 Best Companies to Work For” list, visit the Great Place to Work website.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

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KelleyLuckstein

Wed, Feb 24 at 12:07pm EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

His Holiness the Dalai Lama to Give Special Presentation at Mayo Clinic

the Dalai Lama in a red robe and smiling

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will host His Holiness the Dalai Lama for a special presentation for Mayo Clinic staff on Monday, Feb. 29.

WHO: John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic, will introduce His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

WHAT: His Holiness the Dalai Lama will discuss the topic, “Compassion in Health Care,” during a special presentation to Mayo staff. Cathy Wurzer, Minnesota TV and radio host, will moderate the questions and answers.

WHERE: Mayo Clinic Hospital — Rochester, Saint Marys Campus, Chapel at 1216 Second St. SW.

Reporters should arrive at 11:30 a.m. at the Saint Marys Campus main entrance on the west side of the hospital along 14th Avenue Southwest. Reporters will be escorted by Mayo Clinic Public Affairs employees and wait in a holding room until the event begins.

WHEN: Monday, Feb. 29, 1 p.m. The event will also be available via live webcast on Dalailama.com.

NOTE: Members of the media must RSVP to Kelley Luckstein, Public Affairs, at 507-284-5005. Names of media attendees will be checked by the Department of State.

Media Contact: Kelley Luckstein, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, Feb 4 at 7:00am EST by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Study Shows Association Among Childhood ADHD, Sex and Obesity

Child playing hopscotch on playground outdoors
ROCHESTER, Minn. — The incidence of childhood and adult obesity has increased significantly over the past three decades. New research shows that there is an association between obesity development during adulthood and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Mayo Clinic researchers led the multi-site study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Although various studies propose a connection between childhood ADHD and obesity, “this is the first population-based longitudinal study to examine the association between ADHD and development of obesity using ADHD cases and controls of both sexes derived from the same birth cohort,” says lead author Seema Kumar, M.D., pediatrician and researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center.

The study included 336 individuals with childhood ADHD born from 1976 to 1982 and matched with 665 non-ADHD controls of the same age and sex. Weight, height and stimulant treatment measurements were gathered from medical records detailing care provided from Jan. 1, 1976, through Aug. 31, 2010. Cox models were used to assess the link between ADHD and obesity.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

The researchers found that females with childhood ADHD were at a two-fold greater risk of developing obesity during childhood and adulthood compared to females without ADHD. Obesity was not associated with stimulant treatment among childhood ADHD cases. “Females with ADHD are at risk of developing obesity during adulthood, and stimulant medications used to treat ADHD do not appear to alter that risk,” Dr. Kumar says.

There is a need for greater awareness regarding the association between ADHD and obesity in females among patients, caregivers and health care providers, Dr. Kumar adds.

This study encourages all patients with ADHD to engage in preventive measures, specifically healthy eating and an active lifestyle, as part of routine care to prevent obesity.

As a result of this study, Dr. Kumar and her team are researching the effect of specific psychiatric comorbidities commonly seen in individuals with ADHD on the development of obesity.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Rochester Epidemiology Project grant R01-AG034676.

Additional authors of the study are:

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

About Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available online at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org.

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Dec 28, 2015 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Childhood Asthma May Increase Risks of Shingles

young boy with inhaler for asthma 16x9

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Nearly 1 million incidences of herpes zoster, which is also known as shingles, occur every year in the U.S., with an estimated one-third of all adults affected by age 80. Despite its prevalence, particularly between ages 50 and 59, it is still unclear why some individuals will develop shingles, and others will not. In a population-based study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI), Mayo Clinic researchers build on their previous research from 2013, which linked asthma in childhood with an increased risk of shingles.

“Asthma represents one of the five most burdensome chronic diseases in the U.S., affecting up to 17 percent of the population,” says lead author Young Juhn, M.D., who is a general academic pediatrician and asthma epidemiologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The effect of asthma on the risk of infection or immune dysfunction might very well go beyond the airways.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

Journalists: Video and audio sound bites with Dr. Juhn are available in the downloads. 

Medical records for potential patients with shingles were reviewed in Olmsted County, Minnesota, where 371 cases with shingles — age 67 on average — were identified during the study period and compared against 742 control subjects. Of the 371 shingles cases, 23 percent (87 individuals) had asthma, compared with 15 percent (114 of 742) from the control group. The authors found that adults with asthma were at about a 70 percent greater risk of developing shingles, compared to those without asthma.

The researchers also noted that, with asthma and other atopic conditions accounted for, both asthma and atopic dermatitis were found to be independently associated with a higher risk of shingles. Shingles occurred at a rate of 12 percent in patients with atopic dermatitis (45 of 371 shingles cases) versus 8 percent (58 of 742) of the control subjects.

The underlying mechanisms are not clear; however, impairment in innate immune functions in the skin and airways is well-documented in patients with asthma or atopic dermatitis. Researchers believe that, because asthma helps suppress adaptive immunity, it may increase the risk of varicella zoster virus reactivation.

“As asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for zoster in adults, consideration should be given to immunizing adults aged 50 years and older with asthma or atopic dermatitis as a target group for zoster vaccination,” Dr. Juhn concludes.

The researchers note that neither inhaled corticosteroids nor vaccinations were associated with a higher risk of shingles. Rather, zoster vaccination was associated with a lower risk of shingles.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

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KelleyLuckstein

Dec 21, 2015 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Expert alert: Pertussis — What to look for and when to be treated

sick child coughing

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, has been found in the Rochester community. Many Rochester schools, sports teams and day care providers are affected by this outbreak.

Pertussis is a contagious bacterial illness spread when a person coughs or sneezes. Those at greatest risk of medical complications include infants less than 1 year old; patients with chronic respiratory illnesses, including moderate to severe asthma; women in the third trimester of pregnancy; and patients with compromised immune systems.

Symptoms are similar to a common cold, such as runny nose, nasal congestion, red, watery eyes, fever and cough; however, the cough gradually becomes a severe hacking cough. In young children, this can lead to repeated coughing followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like a “whoop.”

Mayo Clinic experts advise if you or your child has had a cough for seven or more days, contact your medical provider. Individuals who are suspected to have pertussis must be tested and, if diagnosed, will be treated with antibiotics.

Robert Jacobson, M.D., a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, advises, “Those exposed to pertussis should stay home and away from friends, neighbors, school and work until the tests results are negative. If a person is tested positive, he or she should remain quarantined for five days while he or she is being treated with antibiotics.”

Those diagnosed with pertussis who have had the illness fewer than 21 days should be treated with antibiotics to prevent the spread. Without antibiotic treatment, the patient will be contagious for up to 21 days, says Dr. Jacobson.

He adds that the best way to prevent pertussis is with the tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine. Those 11 years and older who have not had the Tdap vaccine should receive it now. Also, all pregnant women should receive additional doses of Tdap during each pregnancy between 27 and 36 weeks.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

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Nov 3, 2015 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic announces 2015 Distinguished Alumni Awards

Recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award: (left to right) Kristina Rother, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D. Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.

Recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award: (left to right) Kristina Rother, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D. Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D.Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; and Kristina Rother, M.D., have been named recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award. The award honors individuals who exemplify Mayo Clinic’s ideals and mission. The honorees were recently recognized at a private event in Rochester.

Garrison Fathman, M.D., is chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology and professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He also is director of the Center for Clinical Immunology at Stanford; co-director of the Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection; principal investigator of the Stanford Rheumatology Training Grant; and chair of the Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence U19 at Stanford.

Dr. Fathman has made numerous contributions to his field in clinical immunology, including early experiments using peptides of auto-antigens to reverse and prevent autoimmunity and studies identifying the role of different T-cell subsets in autoimmunity and transplantation rejection.

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected] [...]

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Oct 2, 2015 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic to Celebrate Heritage Days Oct. 5–9

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic’s annual Heritage Days celebration takes place next week, Oct. 5–9. An array of celebratory events and activities will be held across the institution to thank all of the dedicated employees and volunteers who provide service to patients. All events and activities are free and open to the public.

The theme of this year’s Heritage Days is "Salute to Service,” which honors the involvement of various generations of Mayo Clinic employees and supporters of the armed forces who served on the battlefield and homefront.

The year 2015 marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, during which William Worrall Mayo, M.D., moved to Rochester upon his appointment as an enrolling surgeon for the Union Army, as well as the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, during which Mayo Clinic provided innovative medical science.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005, [email protected]

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Sep 24, 2015 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Kids with asthma exposed to secondhand smoke have twice as many hospitalizations

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Joshi are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected] [...]

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