kevinpunsky

Kevin Punsky @kevinpunsky

About Me

Organization Name
Mayo Clinic

Organization Country
United States

Organization Website
http://www.mayoclinic.org

I have read and accept the Terms of Use for the site.
1

I will not release information before the embargo date provided for each resource.
1

Activity by Kevin Punsky @kevinpunsky

kevinpunsky

Tue, Aug 2 at 12:10am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Florida by U.S. News & World Report

Scenic view of Mayo Clinic Florida campus
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in Florida and the Jacksonville metro area in U.S. News & World Report’s annual list of top hospitals published online today.

In addition to the Florida ranking, Mayo Clinic’s Rochester, Minnesota, campus was named the best hospital in the nation on U.S. News & World Report’s Honor Roll of America’s Best Hospitals. The Rochester campus also took the No. 1 spot in Minnesota, and Mayo Clinic’s campus in Arizona was ranked No. 1 in that state and in the Phoenix metro area.

“The rankings reflect the dedication of our exceptional staff in providing outstanding care and service to our patients,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “Mayo Clinic is a special place because of our employees, and I congratulate each of them on this honor.”

Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus ranked nationally among the top 50 hospitals in eight specialties:

Mayo Clinic in Florida was highly ranked above the national average in Cardiology and Heart Surgery, Nephrology and Urology.

Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus provides diagnosis, medical treatment, surgery and care for more than 105,000 patients each year in 40 specialty areas. Mayo has 5,531 employees in Florida and contributes more than $1.6 billion to the Florida economy.

Mayo Clinic is celebrating 30 years in Florida. In 1986, Mayo Clinic brought its team approach to caring from Rochester to the Southeast when it opened a clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. Today, the nearly 400-acre campus offers a medical destination for patients from all 50 states and 140 countries.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

Journalists: B-roll of the Florida campus and sound bites from Dr. Farrugia are in the downloads.

 

“The No. 1 ranking is outstanding news for Jacksonville and Northeast Florida,” says Dr. Farrugia. “Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy in medicine includes 30 years in Florida. We are proud that Mayo is the medical destination for people from throughout our state and the Southeast who come to us with the most complex medical conditions.”

Many outside agencies rate quality in health care, and Mayo Clinic is the only health care organization that consistently ranks among the top providers nationwide, regardless of the quality measure used.

This is the 27th year that U.S. News & World Report conducted a rankings list, which encompasses 16 medical specialties. U.S. News analyzes data for 5,000 medical centers to determine the rankings, which were announced today on the U.S. News website. In the 2016 rankings, Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus tied for No. 1 in the state.

Additional Resources

Arizona News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 in Phoenix and Arizona by U.S. News & World Report

Minnesota News Release: Mayo Clinic Ranked No. 1 Hospital Nationwide by U.S. News & World Report

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Mon, Jul 25 at 10:30am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic Scientist Receives Pre-eminent International Award for Alzheimer’s Research

Guojun Bu, Ph.D. JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a neuroscientist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive the 2016 MetLife Foundation Major Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease ─ one of the most prestigious awards given annually to the top scientist in this field of study. The award was presented to Dr. Bu today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Toronto.

Over the past 20 years, Dr. Bu and his medical research lab have produced more than 220 peer-reviewed articles that have been cited more than 10,000 times. Colleagues and other Alzheimer’s researchers say his team’s contributions to Alzheimer’s research rank among the most significant in the field.

“We are very proud of Dr. Bu and his outstanding research team,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “At Mayo Clinic, we are grounded in research, so that we can continually advance the science of healing. Our world-class physicians and scientists strive every day to work toward solving the most complex and deadly health issues, such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.”

Dr. Bu, the Mary Lowell Leary Professor at the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, was given the award for his breakthrough discoveries focused on the cell surface receptor called LRP1. Dr. Bu researched the receptor’s role in liver function and discovered that one of its binding partners is apolipoprotein E, or ApoE. When it was discovered that carriers of a gene for the protein called ApoE4 were at significantly greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s in later life, Dr. Bu studied the biology of ApoE and its receptors as they relate to the pathology of Alzheimer’s and related dementia.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

“It is a tremendous honor, and I’m truly grateful to receive the MetLife Award,” says Dr. Bu. “This recognition also affirms the tremendous work by my lab colleagues who have worked diligently with me over the years to find new ways to understand and treat this deadly disease.”

Mayo Clinic is a world leader in research to advance the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Research at Mayo Clinic produces discoveries that translate to new diagnostics, treatment and prevention strategies for some of the most complex neurological diseases. Prior recipients of the MetLife Award on staff at Mayo Clinic are Dennis W. Dickson, M.D.; Clifford R. Jack Jr., M.D.; Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D.; and Steven G. Younkin, M.D., Ph.D.

The MetLife Foundation established the awards in 1986 to recognize and reward scientists demonstrating significant contributions to the understanding of Alzheimer’s disease. The awards are administered by the American Federation for Aging Research, which manages the award selection process and presentation. Dr. Bu’s award carries a $100,000 institutional grant and a personal prize of $25,000.

“MetLife Foundation is proud to present this award to Dr. Bu for his exceptional scientific research contributions, which help bring us closer to finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias,” says A. Dennis White, president and CEO, MetLife Foundation. “His outstanding contributions, recognized around the world, have helped us better understand this devastating illness.”

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Tue, Jun 14 at 10:00am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic Neuropathologist Awarded International Professional Society’s Highest Honor

Dr. Dickson holding a dissected brainJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Dennis W. Dickson, M.D., a neuropathologist at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida, will receive the highest honor bestowed by the American Association of Neuropathologists (AANP), an international society of physicians and scientists who study, diagnose and treat diseases related to the brain, nerves and muscles.

The honor — the Award for Meritorious Contributions to Neuropathology — recognizes a member who has made significant contributions to the advancement of knowledge in neuropathology as well as service to AANP, where Dr. Dickson once served as president and as chair of the Program Committee. The award will be given to him June 17 at the AANP’s annual meeting in Baltimore.

Dr. Dickson is a neuropathologist who focuses on studies of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. He is director of the Udall Center of Excellence in Parkinson’s Disease Research, the Robert E. Jacoby Professor of Alzheimer’s Research, and co-director, Dorothy and Harry T. Mangurian, Jr., Lewy Body Dementia Program.

He also oversees the Mayo Clinic brain bank. For more than 20 years, he has built one of the largest and well-characterized brain banks in the world — a resource that has benefitted research of many scientists and clinicians.

Dr. Dickson was born in Iowa and earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and his medical degree from the University of Iowa, where he also spent a post-sophomore year in anatomic pathology and neuropathology. He completed residency in anatomic pathology and neuropathology at Bronx Municipal Hospital Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City in 1986, where he was the director of Neuropathology for 10 years before arriving at Mayo Clinic.

One of his first research papers described monoclonal antibodies specific to neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a rare parkinsonian disorder. Dr. Dickson went on to develop the world’s largest brain bank for PSP and related disorders.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

Studying donated brains has led to a number of discoveries, including new genes and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease, PSP and other major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Lewy body dementia, frontal lobe dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. More recently, he studied the frequency of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in the Mayo Clinic brain bank with a research fellow, Kevin Bieniek, Ph.D., and found it only in brains of former athletes involved in contact sports.

In addition to providing a final diagnosis, neuropathologic findings provide closure to the family and feedback to the physicians involved in care of the patient. They also help elucidate the molecular pathology of these disorders, which will eventually lead to better diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these disorders, according to Dr. Dickson.

Dr. Dickson has been nationally and internationally recognized with awards, such as the Metropolitan Life Award, Saul R. Korey Award from the AANP, the Fred Springer Award from the American Parkinson’s Disease Association, the Alfred Meyer Award from the British Neuropathological Society and the Potamkin Prize from the American Academy of Neurology. In 2015, he was named a Mayo Clinic Distinguished Investigator.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Tue, Jun 7 at 10:24am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic First to Implant Device to Solve Fecal Incontinence

FENIX Device implanted around the anal canal in a closed position

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A clinical team on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus is the first to offer four patients with long-term fecal incontinence a new and potentially long-lasting treatment — a small band of interlinked magnetic titanium beads on a titanium string that successfully mimics the function of the anal sphincter.

At this point, Mayo Clinic is the only medical center that has surgically implanted this device, known as the Fenix Continence Restoration System. In December 2015, the system received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval under a humanitarian device exemption, which requires approval for patient use by a hospital’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB at Mayo Clinic is the first and, as yet, the only center to approve use of the device.

The issue of fecal incontinence, or accidental bowel leakage, is not unusual. It can affect more than 20 percent of women over 45, says Paul Pettit, M.D., a female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery specialist at Mayo Clinic. “The condition can be debilitating due to social isolation, depression, loss of self-esteem and self-confidence.

“If a patient does not improve through use of less invasive techniques, our only option has been a colostomy,” says Dr. Pettit, who performed the four surgeries. “This device now offers a new option that restores function, and we are happy to be able to offer it.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

FENIX Device: a small, flexible band of interlinked titanium beads with magnetic cores in a circle

The magnetic attraction between the beads then brings the device back to the closed position to prevent unexpected opening of the anal canal that may lead to accidental bowel leakage.

The operation itself lasts about 45 minutes and requires an overnight hospital stay.

Most patients with fecal incontinence — a syndrome that involves unintentional loss of solid or liquid stool — are women, and often the cause is childbirth, when the muscles and nerves near the anus are damaged, Dr. Pettit says.

When the system is implanted, the string of magnetic titanium beads is placed around the anal canal in the closed position. Increased intra-abdominal pressure opens the beads to allow for passage of stool. The magnets then spontaneously close.

The device works immediately after surgery and does not require any activation by the patient or adjustments by a physician, according to the manufacturer, Torax Medical Inc., in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Mayo researchers and clinicians who worked with Dr. Pettit on clinical use of the system are Heidi Chua, M.D., Anita Chen, M.D., and Chris DeStephano, M.D., M.P.H.

Sound bites with Dr. Pettit are available in the download section. 

###
About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Thu, May 26 at 11:30am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Researchers Identify Best Drug Therapy for Rare, Aggressive, Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic tumor illustrationJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Each year, about 200 to 400 Americans develop pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma, a rare form of pancreatic cancer that has no effective standard of care. A study involving researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida and Rochester campuses has found that the chemotherapy drug oxaliplatin is effective in stopping the growth of this cancer. Their discoveries were published May 10 in the Journal of Translation Medicine.

Researchers used tumor tissue biopsied from a patient whose cancer spread to the liver to develop the first patient-derived tumor xenograft, or avatar mouse model, which enabled testing of a number of drugs.

Oxaliplatin stopped tumor growth after only three treatments, and the tumor did not grow back after treatment ended.

“We showed the tumor growth was inhibited by a number of drugs, but oxaliplatin was the standout drug,” says John A. Copland III, Ph.D., a cancer biologist and the study’s principal investigator. “Our hope is that information gleaned from our study will provide new options for patients diagnosed with this rare form of cancer.”

Patients live an average 49 months after being diagnosed with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma. They only live about 14 months once the cancer has spread, or metastasized.


MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746,
[email protected]

Sound bites with Dr. Copland are available in the download section. 

Oxaliplatin inserts itself into DNA, which results in the death of multiplying tumor cells – particularly if those cells carry a DNA repair mutation. The study found that the patient tumor used in this research had a mutation in the DNA repair gene BRCA-2.

This indicates physicians may want to test patients with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma for DNA repair gene mutations to provide a more highly individualized medicine approach toward treatment.

“This may be a breakthrough for this rare cancer,” says Gerardo Colon-Otero, M.D., an oncologist and study co-author. “Genomic testing for DNA mutations can now be performed, and, if the results are positive, those patients are candidates for platinum-based drugs, such as oxaliplatin.”

Lead author Jason Hall, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic research fellow, also showed that the tumor began to re-express markers of normal pancreas tissue.

“This is most likely the explanation for the very prolonged response,” says Dr. Hall. “Perhaps we should explore more chemotherapy drugs that can kill cancer cells as well as revert them to a more normal state.”

Additional Mayo Clinic study co-authors are:

Additional co-authors are:

  • Adam C. Mathias, B.S., of Delta Synthetic Co., Ltd.
  • Louis K. Dawson, B.S.; William F. Durham, M.S.; Robert J. Mullin, Ph.D.; Aidan J. Synnott, Ph.D.; Daniel L. Small, Ph.D.; Julia Schüler, Ph.D. ,Kenneth A. Meshaw, Ph.D.; of Charles Rivers Discovery Services
  • Daniel von Hoff, M.D., of TGen

The study was supported in part by National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA136665 (Dr. Copland) and a generous gift from a grant for Rare Cancers from Dr. Ellis W. and Dona Brunton (Dr. Colon-Otero and Dr. Copland).

Competing interests:

  • Copland and Marlow received royalties from the patient-derived tumor xenograft model licensed to Charles River Laboratories International, Inc.
  • Mathias was an employee of Charles River Laboratories International, Inc., and now is employed by Delta Synthetic Co., Ltd.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://mayoclinic.com or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Tue, Apr 5 at 9:58am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Florida Scientist to Receive International Award for Advances in Dementia Research

Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D.JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Rosa Rademakers, Ph.D., a neurogeneticist on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, will receive one of the highest honors in neuroscience: the 2016 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick’s, Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases.

The $100,000 prize is an internationally recognized tribute for advancing dementia research. It recognizes major contributions to the understanding of the causes, prevention, treatment and cure for Pick's, Alzheimer's and related diseases.

Dr. Rademakers’ research laboratory has made several significant discoveries in the molecular genetics of some of the world’s most devastating neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as well as Parkinson’s disease-related syndromes.

“The physicians and scientists of Mayo Clinic are proud of Dr. Rademakers’ achievements on behalf of our patients and patients everywhere,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

In 2011, Dr. Rademakers’ laboratory identified that an unusual mutation of the C9orf72 gene is the most common cause of ALS and FTD. This explained the disease in more than 30 percent of ALS patients, and about 25 percent of FTD patients who have other family members with dementia or ALS. Her laboratory has since discovered several genetic factors that help explain why some people with the C9orf72 mutation develop ALS, while others develop FTD.

“Winning the Potamkin Prize is a great honor for me,” says Dr. Rademakers. “I feel fortunate to be in the company of many of my colleagues who have also won this award. It could not have happened without the work of all of the people in my laboratory, and so I hope they see this as recognition of their achievement, as well.”

The identification of the C9orf72 mutation was not the first contribution of Dr. Rademakers to unraveling the genetic basis of FTD and related diseases. In 2006, her laboratory played a key role in the discovery of mutations in the progranulin gene, another major cause of FTD. Her laboratory developed a highly predictive blood test to detect progranulin mutations in dementia patients and provided important insight into the regulation of the progranulin protein.

Discoveries of genetic targets such as C9orf72 and progranulin form the basis of diagnostic testing and therapies, and help gain insight into how diseases develop – and how to prevent them. “Being able to provide new leads that could result in treatment strategies for patients with these devastating diseases is the most rewarding part of research,” says Dr. Rademakers.

Sound bites with Dr. Rademakers are available in the download section. 

“We congratulate Dr. Rademakers and her research team on advancing our understanding of dementia,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “At Mayo Clinic, world-leading research informs everything we do. We are grateful that, for the fifth time, the Potamkin Prize recognizes a current Mayo researcher’s commitment to advancing our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and dementias.”

Mayo Clinic is a world leader in research to advance the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Research at Mayo Clinic produces discoveries that translate to new diagnostics, treatment and prevention strategies for some of the most complex neurological diseases of our time. Prior recipients of the Potamkin Prize on staff at Mayo Clinic are Steven G. Younkin, M.D., Ph.D.; Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D.; Clifford R. Jack Jr., M.D.; and Dennis W. Dickson, M.D.

Dr. Rademakers is the Mildred A. and Henry Uihlein II Professor of Medical Research in Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Her research is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, the Mayo Clinic Morris K. Udall Center of Excellence in Parkinson's Disease Research, and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. She also receives support from the ALS Therapy Alliance, the Florida Department of Health's Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer's Disease Research Program, and the Consortium for Frontotemporal Dementia Research.

The Potamkin Prize is awarded annually by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Brain Foundation. Dr. Rademakers will receive the award on April 18, 2016, at the world’s largest gathering of neurologists – the AAN’s 68th Annual Meeting, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Thu, Mar 31 at 10:25am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Way to Prevent Accumulation of Amyloid Plaque, a Hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease

Illustration of a healthy brain and Alzheimer's brainJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic researchers led a laboratory study that found a new way to prevent the accumulation of amyloid plaque – a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease – by eliminating a class of molecules called heparan sulfates that form on brain cells.

“Just as a carpet covers a floor and can hold dirt, molecules called heparan sulfates can cover brain cells and trap and hold amyloid peptides, which can then form into clumps called plaque,” says Guojun Bu, Ph.D., a molecular neurobiologist on Mayo’s Florida campus.

The research study deleted the Ext1 gene in laboratory mice using genetic engineering technology. This, in turn, prevented heparan sulfates from forming on the surface of brain cells. The surface was smoother – think tiled floor versus carpet – and this enabled the brain to efficiently clear out amyloid, says Dr. Bu, associate director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center.

“Our study proves heparan sulfates as the basis for a cascade of events leading to the formation of amyloid plaque, which is an early and essential pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Bu.

The research is published in the March 30, 2016, edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

The researchers also studied donated brain tissue of people who had Alzheimer’s disease during their lifetime. The researchers found increased amounts of heparan sulfates in brains from individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, compared with individuals who did not have the disease. This further backed the finding that an abundance of heparan sulfates is a contributing factor in Alzheimer’s disease.

The study also has implications for preventing tau tangles, another hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, because tau tangles develop later in the process of disease’s development, says Dr. Bu, the Mary Lowell Leary Professor of Medicine.

“Amyloid plaques typically accumulate in the brain for many years before patients develop symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Bu. “Our laboratory is now developing tests to identify compounds that could block heparan sulfates from interacting with amyloid and forming plaque. The goal is to prevent or stop Alzheimer’s disease from occurring.”

Preclinical laboratory testing must occur before any drug could be tested with patients.

The Mayo Clinic team collaborated on the research with Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in California and Washington University in St. Louis. Brain tissue was provided by the University of Kentucky Alzheimer’s Disease Center Neuropathology Core.

The study was funded by the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

In addition to Dr. Bu, Mayo researchers involved in the study are:

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. Mayo Clinic is a world leader in research to advance the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Research at Mayo Clinic produces discoveries that translate to new diagnostics, treatment and prevention strategies for some of the most complex neurological diseases.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Wed, Mar 30 at 2:30pm EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic’s Colon Cancer Awareness Campaign Wins ASGE Award

medical illustration of colon, polyp and colonoscope

Promoting the use of colonoscopy through visual graphics, a team of gastroenterologists on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus has won the Community Outreach Award from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE).

The award is for designing an infographic that grabs readers’ attention in a manner that is easy to understand and effective in promoting colorectal cancer awareness and prevention. The illustration equates road safety signs to signs to follow to ensure personal health. For example, a yellow roadside caution sign says this in text next to the sign: Screen earlier if there is a family history of colorectal cancer.

Drs. Bhaumik S. Brahmbhatt and Michael B. Wallace will receive the ASGE award at the ASGE’s 75th-annual meeting in San Diego in May. ASGE will feature the graphic in a booklet and on the organization’s website. ASGE also will use the graphic in information campaigns designed to increase colon cancer prevention awareness.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

infograpic

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Tue, Mar 29 at 10:00am EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic Invests $100 Million in Destination Medical Center in the Southeast

wide shot of Mayo Clinic Florida campus with blue sky and water in foregroundJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Advancing its position as the premier medical destination center for health care in the Southeast, Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida will invest $100 million in major construction projects building on its 150-year history of transforming health care and the patient experience.

This summer, Mayo Clinic will begin constructing an innovative destination medical building that will provide integrated services needed for complex cancer, as well as neurologic and neurosurgical care. Initially rising four stories, the 150,000-square-foot building has the potential for 11 more stories. More than 126,000 patients are expected to visit the first year the building opens.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

“Mayo Clinic is proud to be out front leading the way to shape the future of health care,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO, Mayo Clinic in Florida. “With our vision to be the destination medical center of the Southeast, we are making significant investments in people, facilities and technology to meet the needs of all of our patients, especially those who come to us for help with complex medical problems.”

Features of the destination medical building include:

  • Two floors devoted exclusively to hematology and oncology care
    The new space more than doubles the size of the Hematology and Oncology Department and will be complemented by a 50 percent increase in staff. The number of clinical trials and Mayo’s capacity to serve patients also will increase.
  • A chemotherapy area
    This area offers patients privacy and comfort, as well as space for family members, a dedicated nourishment area and a patient library.
  • One floor devoted exclusively to neurology and neurosurgery
    The new building also doubles the space for the neurology and neurosurgical departments and will support the hiring of 12 new neurologists and neurosurgeons.
  • Patient care enhancements
    Patient care enhancements include an outdoor garden and meeting space for support groups.
  • Education enhancements
    The building includes space designed specifically for Mayo Clinic’s education efforts and the training of residents and fellows.
View of a cyclotron from the inside

The cyclotron, similar to the one pictured from Mayo’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota, will enhance Mayo Clinic in Florida’s clinical practice in the area of molecular imaging and provide patients with access to the latest advancement in prostate cancer staging and detection.

Another construction project on Mayo’s Florida campus that begins this year is a state-of-the-art positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry facility. The facility will house a radiochemistry laboratory and a cyclotron – a particle accelerator important in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The facility will produce Mayo-developed choline C-11 used in certain PET scans. The scans are the latest advancements in imaging tests that “light up” prostate cancer wherever it is found and provide targets for therapy. Locating recurrent prostate cancer sooner may enable Mayo physicians to target the cancer more quickly, before it spreads even further allowing for more effective treatment.

“With the ability to produce choline C-11 PET scans, Mayo’s cyclotron will be unlike any other in the Southeast,” Dr. Farrugia says. “It will enhance Mayo’s clinical practice and play an important role in research.”

“Millions of dollars are spent each year in the U.S. on producing cancer therapies that don’t help – often because physicians and medical personnel can’t see where the cancer has spread,” Dr. Farrugia continues. “The cyclotron and production of this imaging technology are great examples of how Mayo Clinic is leading the way in health care to produce better patient outcomes, reduce cost and advance scientific discovery.”

Over the next five years, Mayo Clinic will add about 40 physicians and scientists and 250 allied health employees to support the new destination medical building and PET radiochemistry facility. Mayo currently has 5,351 employees and contributes more than $1.6 billion to the Florida economy.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Thu, Feb 18 at 2:00pm EDT by @kevinpunsky · View  

Surgery and Stenting Safe, Effective Lowering Long-Term Risk of Stroke

medical illustration of carotid stenting 16x9

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Stenting and surgery are equally effective at lowering the long-term risk of stroke from a narrowed carotid artery, according to results of CREST – a 10-year, federally funded clinical trial led by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. The results are being published today online in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the American Heart Association’s International Stroke Conference in Los Angeles.

One of the largest randomized stroke prevention trials ever, CREST (Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial) conducted a study of 2,502 patients with an average age of 69 for up to 10 years at 117 centers in the U.S. and Canada. The centers were coordinated through Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, and the patient results were analyzed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746,
[email protected]

The study found the risk for stroke after either stenting or surgery (endarterectomy) was about 7 percent. The 10-year comparisons of restenosis (re-narrowing of the carotid artery) were low for both stenting and surgery – about 1 percent per year. Equal benefit was found for older and younger individuals, men and women, patients who had previously had a stroke, and those who had not.

“This very low rate shows these two procedures are safe and are also very durable in preventing stroke,” says CREST principal investigator Thomas G. Brott, M.D., a neurologist and the Eugene and Marcia Applebaum Professor of Neurosciences on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Florida. “Because Medicare-age patients with carotid narrowing are living longer, the durability of stenting and surgery will be reassuring to the patients and their families.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Brott are available in the downloads.

A carotid artery runs up each side of the neck. Plaque buildup can cause narrowing and hardening of the artery – a condition called atherosclerosis. This can reduce blood flow and cause clotting, which can result in a stroke.

Endarterectomy removes the narrowed segment of the artery surgically, while stenting uses a catheter to place a stent in the narrowed artery to widen it.

In 2010, phase one of CREST found stenting and surgery to be equally safe procedures, with fewer strokes among those who had surgery, and fewer heart attacks among those who received stents. Those results also were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“This second phase completes a story, and the results are very encouraging,” Dr. Brott says. “We have two safe procedures. We know now that they are very effective in the long run. Now the patient and the physician have the option to select surgery or stenting, based on that individual patient’s medical condition and preferences.”

Walter Koroshetz, M.D., director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, also noted that “the stroke rate in CREST was less than half of what was seen in similar studies from the late 1900s, which reinforces the benefits of modern medical control of vascular risk factors.”

Despite the results of CREST, the question of the best way to manage stroke risk has not been answered yet. Because of that, CREST-2 was launched in December 2014 to compare stenting and surgery to medical management. CREST-2, which is expected to end in 2022, is being funded by a $39.5 million grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

“Carotid narrowing causes about 5 to 10 percent of all strokes in the U.S.,” Dr. Brott says. “Since there are about 800,000 strokes a year, we’re talking about 40,000 to 50,000 strokes a year. If we can find the best way to prevent those strokes, then we will have provided a service to those patients.”

CREST is funded by a grant (U01 NS038384-11) from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institutes of Health. Additional support comes from Abbott Vascular, including donations of Accunet and Acculink systems that were equivalent to approximately 15 percent of the total study cost, to CREST centers in Canada and the U.S. that were at U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs sites.

###

About Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

 

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Dec 2, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Evidence Suggests Amateur Contact Sports Increase Risk of Degenerative Disorder

Abnormal tau protein (brown) in a sample of the brain in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) on the left and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on the right. In CTE, tau is deposited at the depths of brain folds (’sulci’), whereas in AD tau is deposited throughout the gray matter but not in the underlying white matter.

Abnormal tau protein (brown) in a brain sample in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), on left and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), right. In CTE, tau is deposited at the depths of brain folds (’sulci’), whereas in AD, tau is deposited throughout the gray matter but not in the underlying white matter.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Scientists have recently found evidence that professional football players are susceptible to a progressive degenerative disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which is caused by repetitive brain trauma. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a significant and surprising amount of CTE in males who had participated in amateur contact sports in their youth.

About one-third of these men whose brains had been donated to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank had evidence of CTE pathology. CTE only can be diagnosed posthumously.

The Mayo study, published in the December issue of Acta Neuropathologica, links amateur contact sports — football, boxing, wrestling, rugby, basketball, baseball and others played while in school — with the development of CTE, which when severe can affect mood, behavior and cognition.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

Journalists: Sound bites with study author Kevin Bieniek are available in the downloads. 

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Nov 12, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic awarded $5.3 million federal grant to study vascular risk factors in dementia

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus was awarded a $5.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify vascular risk factors in aging and dementia, and translate that knowledge into studying potential targets for treatment.closeup of young hands and older hands working on a puzzle

The grant is one of the first awarded as part of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act, which called for an aggressive and coordinated national Alzheimer’s disease plan. The first goal of the national plan is to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s disease by 2025.

Guojun Bu, Ph.D., molecular neuroscientist, and Nilüfer Ertekin-Taner, M.D., Ph.D., neurologist and neurogeneticist, are the principal investigators for the study. Both are based on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. Several additional investigators on Mayo’s Florida and Rochester, Minnesota, campuses, as well as Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, will be involved.

Jounalists: Sound bites with Guojun Bu, Ph.D., and Nilüfer Ertekin-Taner, M.D., Ph.D., are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Oct 11, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic and St. Vincent’s HealthCare collaborate on cancer care services

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus and St. Vincent’s HealthCare, a ministry of Ascension Health, are collaborating to bring Mayo Clinic’s nationally ranked cancer services to patients in a newly built medical suite on the campus of St. Vincent’s Riverside. The goal is to offer Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center’s programs and services to more patients directly in the community.

Construction of the 11,500-square-foot medical suite is expected to be completed in summer of 2016. Financial details of the agreement will not be disclosed.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with a local health system that is known worldwide for delivering superior cancer care,” says Michael Schatzlein, M.D., President and CEO of St. Vincent’s HealthCare. “Every year, thousands of patients travel across the globe to be treated by Mayo Clinic physicians, and, now, St. Vincent’s will offer our patients the same high-quality care right here on our Riverside campus.”

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]
Kyle Sieg, St. Vincent’s HealthCare, 904-308-7992, [email protected]

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Sep 15, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo receives federal grant to test innovative triple-negative breast cancer vaccine

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have been awarded a $13.3 million, five-year federal grant to test a vaccine designed to prevent the recurrence of triple-negative breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer for which there are no targeted therapies.

The clinical trial, which will enroll 280 patients at multiple clinical sites, is expected to begin early in 2016.

The grant, the Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense’s Breast Cancer Research Program, will fund a national, phase II clinical trial testing the ability of a folate receptor alpha vaccine to prevent recurrence of this aggressive cancer following initial treatment.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Knutson are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected] [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Aug 24, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic researchers find new code that makes reprogramming of cancer cells possible

 

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Cancer researchers dream of the day they can force tumor cells to morph back to the normal cells they once were. Now, researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy.

The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator, Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Anastasiadis are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Jul 23, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Researchers decode molecular action of combination therapy for a deadly thyroid cancer

ResearchJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — In their bid to find the best combination of therapies to treat anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus demonstrated that all histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are not created equal.

In testing multiple HDAC inhibitors in combination with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel, known to give some benefit for this aggressive cancer, they found that class II HDAC inhibitors signal through a newly discovered pathway to promote synergy with chemotherapy treatment.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Copland are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Jul 21, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

U.S. News & World Report ranks Mayo Clinic No. 1 in Jacksonville, a leading hospital nationally in cancer and 3 other areas

Mayo Clinic in Florida

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — U.S. News & World Report again has named Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus to its annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals” published online today. Mayo Clinic is ranked No. 1 in the Jacksonville metro area, No. 4 in Florida and among the top 50 hospitals nationally in cancer, gastroenterology (GI) and GI surgery, geriatrics, and neurology and neurosurgery.

The Florida campus also was recognized as high performing in diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gynecology, nephrology, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology.

“This honor reflects the deep commitment of our staff to provide the highest quality of care to our patients every day,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. “Our employees are critical to the success of Mayo Clinic. I’m extremely grateful for their dedication and commitment to making the patient experience the very best it can be.”

Journalists: Sound bites from Dr. Farrugia are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected] [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Jul 20, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic study uncovers key differences among ALS patients

Mayo Clinic researchers conducted a statistical analysis to determine the degree of divergence in differentially expressed RNAs in patients with c9ALS (black) with those in patients with sALS (purple) or healthy individuals (green, controls). Changes in c9ALS distinctly diverge from the other two groups as the black circles are farthest from the purple and green circles. Each circle represents an individual included in the study, color-coded depending on its group membership, and shown in a linear transformation on a vector space (3-D cube).

Mayo Clinic researchers conducted a statistical analysis to determine the degree of divergence in differentially expressed RNAs in patients with c9ALS (black) with those in patients with sALS (purple) or healthy individuals (green, controls). Changes in c9ALS distinctly diverge from the other two groups as the black circles are farthest from the purple and green circles. Each circle represents an individual included in the study, color-coded depending on its group membership, and shown in a linear transformation on a vector space (3-D cube).

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have identified key differences between patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and those with the most common genetic form of ALS, a mutation in the C9orf72 gene.

Their findings, reported online today in Nature Neuroscience, demonstrate that ALS patients show abnormalities in levels and processing of ribonucleic acids (RNA), biological molecules that determine what gene information is used to guide protein synthesis.

More than 30,000 Americans live with ALS, a condition that destroys motor neuron cells that control essential muscle activity, such as speaking, walking, breathing and swallowing. While increasing efforts are geared toward therapeutic development, an effective drug for ALS has yet to be identified, in large part because of our incomplete understanding of the disease.

“Our results using advanced, modern laboratory techniques called next-generation sequencing, allowed us to acquire a library of new knowledge about patients with ALS,” says the study’s senior author, Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Neuroscience on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

Dr. Petrucelli and Hu Li, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology on Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minn., led a team of investigators who carefully analyzed the RNA from human brain tissues. They found that ALS brains had numerous RNA defects, compared to nondisease brains. They also predicted molecular events that may be altered due to the changes found in RNAs involved in pathways regulating those events and that may contribute to ALS.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Jun 29, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic study suggests which glioblastoma patients may benefit from drug treatment

Brain Cancer medical illustrationJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Clinicians testing the drug dasatinib, approved for several blood cancers, had hoped it would slow the aggressive growth of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma; however, clinical trials to date have not found any benefit. Researchers at Mayo Clinic, who conducted one of those clinical trials, believe they know why dasatinib failed — and what to do about it.

In the online issue of Molecular Oncology, investigators report finding that dasatinib inhibits proteins that promote cancer growth as expected but also suppresses proteins that protect against cancer.

The findings suggest that pretesting patient glioblastoma biopsies will help identify who may respond well to dasatinib and who should avoid using the drug, says the study’s senior author, Panos Z. Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected] [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
kevinpunsky

Jun 17, 2015 by @kevinpunsky · View  

Mayo Clinic’s Pulmonary Hypertension Program Receives National Recognition

Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic in Florida has been named a Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center by the Pulmonary Hypertension Association. The designation is given to centers that provide early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, a full range of therapies and specialized care, outcomes follow-up and clinical research and studies, among other points of excellence.

Mayo Clinic in Florida is the only Pulmonary Hypertension Care Center in the Southeast and one of only 26 in the country.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, [email protected]

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
Loading information...