colettegallagher

Colette Gallagher @colettegallagher

About Me

Organization Name
mayo clinic

Organization Country
united states

Organization Website
http://www.mayo.edu/ctsa/

Activity by Colette Gallagher @colettegallagher

colettegallagher

Mon, Jun 27 at 10:03am EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

Transplant Genomics Enters Collaboration with Mayo Clinic

close-up of transplant surgeon performing surgeryROCHESTER, Minn. — Transplant Genomics Inc.® (TGI) is collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine to develop, validate and commercialize diagnostic tests enabling personalized immunosuppression for solid organ transplant recipients. This multiyear collaboration includes an assessment of TGI's TruGraf™ test for renal transplant monitoring, a Mayo Clinic investment in TGI, and the co-development of new tests and technologies for additional targets, including exploratory studies in heart and liver transplantation.

Physicians and researchers are participating at Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Rochester, Minnesota. Principal investigators include: Mark Stegall, M.D., Raymond Heilman, M.D., and Martin Mai, M.D., Mayo Clinic Transplant Center.

“At Mayo, our research in this area is focused on improving long-term kidney graft survival, so that patients would lead healthier lives. Genomic analysis of blood can reveal early signs of rejection in transplanted kidneys. The potential clinical utility is to be able to monitor for rejection more frequently than is possible with surveillance biopsies and to individualize immunosuppression in transplant recipients,” says Dr. Stegall.

Transplant Genomics logo

TruGraf’s ability to detect early transplant rejection in patients with stable kidney transplant function will provide physicians with a tool to help provide the appropriate levels of immunosuppressive therapy. Our first collaborative project together is a case study in individualized medicine in which TruGraf will be used to support decisions around personalized immunosuppression,” says Roy First, M.D., chief medical officer, Transplant Genomics.

MEDIA CONTACTS: Colette Gallagher or Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected] 

Darren Lee, Transplant Genomics Inc, 781-454-6523, [email protected]

 Dr. Stegall is the James C. Masson Professor of Surgery at Mayo Clinic.

About Transplant Genomics Inc.
Transplant Genomics Inc. (TGI) is a molecular diagnostics company committed to improving organ transplant outcomes, with an initial focus on kidney transplant recipients. Working with the transplant community, TGI is commercializing a suite of tests enabling diagnosis and prediction of transplant recipient immune status. Test results will support clinicians with information to optimize immunosuppressive therapy, enhance patient care and improve graft survival. Test services are offered through TGI’s CLIA lab in Pleasanton, CA. http://www.transplantgenomics.com

About Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine
The Center for Individualized Medicine discovers and integrates the latest in genomic, molecular and clinical sciences into personalized care for each Mayo Clinic patient. For more information, visit http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/center-for-individualized-medicine/.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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Wed, Jun 22 at 12:08pm EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

National Institutes of Health Chooses Mayo Clinic for Biobank, but what is a Biobank?

Mayo Clinic Biobank- Biospecimen Processing Technician, Mimi Iyorbo, inspects a rack of samples ready for storage in the Mayo Clinic robotic freezer.ROCHESTER, Minn. — On May 26, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Mayo Clinic $142 million over five years to serve as home for the 1-million-person Precision Medicine Initiative® (PMI) Cohort Program biobank.

Precision Medicine Defined: Precision, or personalized medicine, is a model of care that customizes medical treatment to each individual. To illuminate differences and similarities in health all the way down to the level of an individual patient, researchers need to link data from a variety of sources. Some of those sources are physical, such as blood or urine samples, cells, tissues or organs removed in medical procedures. And some, such as electronic health records, mobile health data, and vital signs, are informational.

Typically, these data are spread out among different facilities and within different software or databases. Collecting and standardizing the information can slow down the research process.

The answer? A biobank.

Biobanking: A biobank is a facility designed to safely and privately hold health information and keep biological samples in optimal condition to enable research. For the Precision Medicine Initiative® biobank, Mayo Clinic will store more than 35 million physical, or biological, samples expected to be gathered, and provide efficient, safe and privacy-protected methods for researchers to analyze these data.

Mayo Clinic’s Biobanks: Mayo Clinic’s biobanks consist of both targeted collections that focus on a single disease, such as bipolar disorder, and a general population collection consisting primarily of Mayo Clinic patients. The Mayo Clinic Biobank has served as a research resource for several years and has infrastructure in place to quickly implement the policies and procedures associated with this initiative.

The PMI Biobank: The PMI samples will be collected from volunteers across the U.S., and participants will have access to their personal data as well as summarized data from across the group. These samples will be cataloged and stored in automated, secured freezer complexes, primarily at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, but also at the Mayo Clinic biospecimen laboratory in Jacksonville, Florida. The NIH award will be administered by Mine Cicek, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Biospecimen Accessioning and Processing Core Laboratory, and Stephen Thibodeau, Ph.D., co-director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine Biorepositories Program, the David F. and Margaret T. Grohne Director of the Biorepositories Program for the Center for Individualized Medicine, and the William H. Donner Professor.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

Dr. Cicek notes that the highly automated Mayo Clinic Bioservices facility allows for efficient and accurate handling and processing of specimens, which will include robotic systems to separate, label and store biospecimen components, including automated DNA extraction.

Dr. Thibodeau says, “We are delighted that our state-of-the-art facilities will serve as an active, vital research resource for the 1-million-participant biospecimen collection. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is committed to embracing the potential of precision medicine to improve health care.”

For more information on the NIH biobank, the Mayo Biobank or biobanking in general, Dr. Thibodeau is available to speak with reporters.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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Thu, May 26 at 4:01pm EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

Mayo Clinic to be Home of National Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program Biobank

Mayo Clinic Biobank- Biospecimen Processing Technician, Mimi Iyorbo, inspects a rack of samples ready for storage in the Mayo Clinic robotic freezer.ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will be awarded $142 million in funding over five years by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to serve as the national Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program biobank. The biobank will hold a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for this longitudinal program that aims to enroll 1 million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine.

Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person.

The Precision Medicine Initiative was launched by President Barack Obama in 2015 “to bring us closer to curing diseases like cancer and diabetes, and to give all of us access to the personalized information we need to keep ourselves and our families healthier.” Data from biological samples combined with information from lifestyle and health questionnaires, medication history, electronic health records, physical exams, and environmental exposures and real time physiology tracked through digital technologies, will help researchers examine individual differences in health and disease.

“This range of information at the scale of 1 million people will be an unprecedented resource for researchers working to understand all the factors that influence health and disease,” says Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., NIH director. “The more we understand about individual differences, the better able we will be to tailor the prevention and treatment of illness.”

The Precision Medicine Cohort Program biobank will reflect the diversity of the U.S. population by including participants from diverse social, racial/ethnic, and ancestral populations living in a variety of geographies, social environments, and economic circumstances, and from all age groups and health statuses. The PMI Cohort Program biobank then will provide the infrastructure to store and curate more than 35 million biospecimens.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

“Mayo Clinic has a responsibility to seek new medical knowledge and share that knowledge with others. The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is proud to accelerate research nationally through the PMI Cohort Program biobank,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO. “This important effort over the coming years complements the Destination Medical Center initiative and Discovery Square at Mayo Clinic designed for global research innovation and collaboration.”

“Mayo Clinic believes that individualized, or precision, medicine will help improve the quality of health care, while lowering cost through more accurate diagnosis, avoidance of unnecessary testing, and delivery of more tailored, effective and safer therapies,” says Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., Carlson and Nelson Endowed Director, Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, and Vasek and Anna Maria Polak Professor of Cancer Research.

Having identified individualized medicine as a strategic priority, Mayo Clinic is investing in its Florida and Minnesota campuses in the PMI Cohort Program biobank with a 30,000-square-foot facility expansion, including advanced automation technology, state-of-the-art robotic freezers, and personnel.

“This is an extraordinary opportunity for Mayo to participate in, and share, our expertise with an important national research initiative,” says Stephen Thibodeau, Ph.D., the David F. and Margaret T. Grohne Director, Mayo Clinic Biorepositories Program, Center for Individualized Medicine, and co-principal investigator of the PMI biobank award. According to Mine Cicek, Ph.D., director of the Biospecimen Accessioning and Processing Core laboratory and co-principal investigator, Mayo Clinic Bioservices, the highly automated facility allows for efficient and accurate handling and processing of specimens, which will include robotic systems to separate, label, and store biospecimen components, including automated DNA extraction.

“Our facilities are built to serve as a vital resource for storing and analyzing all biospecimens, under the highest-level quality possible and to minimize loss, damage, or contamination, with the ability to retrieve them efficiently for research use,” says Dr. Thibodeau, the William H. Donner Professor.

In addition to the Mayo Clinic Biobank in Minnesota, Biospecimen Accessioning and Processing Core laboratory site on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus will provide sample storage for 20-25 percent (8-10 million samples) of the collection, to protect the national resource from a localized natural disaster.

Mayo Clinic also will harness the resources of Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML) to accomplish the goals of the PMI Cohort Program biobank. The MML nationwide network covers all 50 states with more than 300 couriers and longstanding relationships with major logistic providers that ensure the shortest transit time possible for specimens. Today, MML receives 35,000-40,000 specimens per day and performs 23 million tests per year.

Once established, the PMI Biobank will be a major force in advancing precision medicine and contributing to research and improved health care.

About the NIH
NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 institutes and centers, and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments and cures for common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

About Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine
The Center for Individualized Medicine discovers and integrates the latest in genomic, molecular and clinical sciences into personalized care for each Mayo Clinic patient. For more information, visit http://mayoresearch.mayo.edu/center-for-individualized-medicine/

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

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colettegallagher

Fri, May 13 at 6:00am EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

Mayo Clinic Joins the National Microbiome Initiative

medical illustration of human body and microbiomes

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine joined the National Microbiome Initiative sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). More than 100 institutions committed to advance microbiome research in areas such as health care, food safety and security, environmental protection, and bioenergy production.

In support of the National Microbiome Initiative Mayo Clinic is committed to establishing a Microbiome Clinic, offering clinical services, diagnostics and patient education.

“The new clinic will focus on improving the care of the individual patient through knowledge of the human microbiome,” says Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S. , consultant in gastroenterology, associate director of the Mayo Clinic Microbiome Program.

bio picture of Dr. Purna Kashyap in business suit

Media Contact: Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, at [email protected] or 507-284-5005.

According to Dr. Kashyap new diagnostics based on next-generation sequencing will allow the Microbiome Clinic to individualize treatment of undiagnosed infections and conditions, as well as to perform hospital surveillance. These will include bacterial whole genome sequencing to track and identify source of outbreaks and determine antibiotic susceptibility, clinical metagenomic profiling to identify unculturable  bacteria causing infections and microbial community profiling as biomarkers of disease outcomes and response to treatment.

In addition to the well-established fecal microbiota transplant program, Mayo will offer new therapies emerging from clinical trials. Patient education will focus on helping patients navigate the complex options that promote health and wellness, including diet and nutritional supplements and probiotic foods.

"The Center for Individualized Medicine’s Microbiome Program will continue to support a discovery, translational and clinical research portfolio that ensures continued success of the Microbiome Clinic." says Heidi Nelson, M.D., consultant in colon and rectal surgery, program director of the Microbiome Program, and the Fred C. Andersen Professor.

WEBCAST: The Future of the Microbiomes Event will be webcast live.

Read more facts about the OSTP Microbiome Initiative. 

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About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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colettegallagher

Fri, Apr 22 at 1:00pm EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

Mayo Clinic Research Information Center Presents ‘Changing Lives Through Research’

Mayo Clinic Research CenterROCHESTER, Minn. — On April 27, the Mayo Clinic Research Information Center  will present “Changing Lives Through Research,” an informal gathering featuring the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. Here, you can find out more about precision medicine and hear from a variety of speakers on how it is changing people’s lives through research into the field of genome sequencing, the microbiome, pharmacogenomics and more. Drop in for any of the presentations, ask questions and learn more about precision medicine.

Review the program for the “Changing Lives Through Research” gathering.

Wednesday, April 27
Research Information Center, Gonda Lobby

10-10:30 a.m.
“Future of Individualized Medicine”
Scott Beck, associate administrator, Center for Individualized Medicine

11-11:30 a.m.
“Family History and Me”
Teresa Kruisselbrink, M.S., certified genetic counselor

12:30-1:30 p.m.
“Microbiome: Your Body, Your Bugs, Your Health”
Purna Kashyap, M.B.B.S., Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Nicholas Chia, Ph.D., Surgical Research
Marina Walther-Antonio, Ph.D., Surgical Research

1:30-2:30 p.m.
“Medication and My Genes: Why Does It Matter?”
Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., Pharmacology Research

Visit the Mayo Clinic's Research Information Center in the Gonda Lobby on April 27 between 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. for the presentations. The Research Information Center is open to the public weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

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Tue, Mar 1 at 11:15am EDT by @colettegallagher · View  

Whole-Exome Sequencing: A Rational Approach for ‘Diagnostic Odyssey’ Patients

genetics image for whole-exome sequencing

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new clinical study from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine shows that whole-exome sequencing (WES) could serve as a viable diagnostic approach for identifying rare inherited diseases and providing a resolution for patients on a diagnostic odyssey.  WES is a laboratory process that determines, all at once, the entire unique DNA sequence (i.e., the inherited genetic material) of an organism’s genome. WES provides patients with rare genetic conditions who have been evaluated by multiple providers over, sometimes, years, without a diagnosis (i.e., a diagnostic odyssey) an opportunity to get answers.

“The significant diagnostic yield, moderate cost and notable health marketplace acceptance of whole-exome sequencing for clinical purposes, compared with conventional genetic testing, make it a rational diagnostic approach for patients on a diagnostic odyssey,” says lead author Konstantinos Lazaridis, M.D., director of the Mayo Individualized Medicine Clinic and primary investigator of the multisite study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

MEDIA CONTACT: Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

During the study, WES testing was provided by Mayo Clinic physicians to patients on a diagnostic odyssey. DNA specimens of the person seeking medical attention and other affected or unaffected relatives were submitted to clinical WES laboratories. Researchers aimed at discovering genetic variant(s) that cause or contribute to the patient’s disease, permitting resolution of the diagnostic odyssey and potentially leading to better patient management through disease-specific treatments.

In the first 18 consecutive months, the Individualized Medicine Clinic received 82 consult requests for patients on a diagnostic odyssey. Seven of the cases were deferred, and 75 cases were approved to proceed with WES. Individualized Medicine Clinic genomic counselors met with 71 patients; 51 patients submitted specimens for clinical WES testing and received the results. Ultimately, 15 patients or 29 percent resulted in a diagnosis based on WES findings.

“The success rate of 29 percent, which is about twofold higher of conventional genetic evaluations for such patients, makes WES a reasonable diagnostic approach for patients on a diagnostic odyssey” says Dr. Lazaridis.

The health care marketplace also appears to be accepting WES as a valued diagnostic approach for these patients— a concern of any new genetic test. Despite the slightly higher cost of testing ($8,000 average cost per patient), WES is poised to show increasing value due to the continued decline in sequencing costs. Of interest, the study reported that Medicaid supported 27 percent of the patients, and 38 percent of patients received complete or partial insurance coverage. There was a relatively low rate (15 percent) of known insurance denial for WES testing. Six patients or 12 percent were fully covered by commercial insurance, and the average out-of-pocket expense of the 4 out of 18 patients with partial insurance coverage for which data was provided was approximately 13 percent of the cost of testing. These findings support that insurance coverage exists for clinical WES testing and is similar to that of established genetic tests.

“With several million patients in the U.S. suffering from a rare or an undiagnosed disease, WES is emerging as a promising, affordable test that could enhance clinical care by improving diagnosis of such patients. I envision, one day WES will be performed on every newborn and every patient who needs medical care” says Dr. Lazaridis.

The research was funded by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, James L. and Donna K. Barksdale, Everett J. and Jane M. Hauck and the William O. Lund Jr., and Natalie C. Lund Charitable Foundation. Dr. Lazaridis is the Everett J. and Jane M. Hauck Associate Director in Minnesota. He is also recognized as the William O. Lund, Jr., and Natalie C. Lund Director, Clinomics Program.

Additional authors on the research team are:

  • Kimberly Schahl, CGC, Informed DNA
  • Margot Cousin, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Dusica Babovic-Vuksanovic, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Douglas Riegert-Johnson, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Ralitza Gavrilova, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Tammy McAllister, M.A., Mayo Clinic
  • Noralane Lindor, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Roshini Abraham, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Pavel Pichurin, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • David Deyle, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Dimitar Gavrilov, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Jennifer Hand, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Eric Klee, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Michael Stephens, M.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Myra Wick, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Elizabeth Atkinson, M.S., Mayo Clinic
  • David Linden, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Matthew Ferber, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Eric Wieben, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
  • Gianrico Farrugia, M.D. , Mayo Clinic

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

About Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org.

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Jul 8, 2014 by @colettegallagher · View  

Expert Alert: Sundeep Khosla, M.D. to Testify - Modernizing Clinical Trials

Dr. Khosla testifying on modernizing clinical trials - Capitol Hill hearingWatch now LIVE 10 am ET Energy & Commerce Committee Hearing.  

Principal Investigator and Director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS)Sundeep Khosla, M.D.,is testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health as part of the Committee’s 21st Century Cures Initiative Wed., July 9, 2014. Dr. Khosla will focus his testimony on the need and opportunity to modernize clinical trials. “I applaud the Committee’s 21st Century Cures Initiative and, in particular, the Health Subcommittee’s focus on the clinical trial process,” says Dr. Khosla. “It is imperative that we streamline and modernize clinical trials’ processes to accelerate the speed of discovery to delivery of more effective, innovative and personalized treatments for patients.” In addition, Dr. Khosla commends the Committee’s attention to the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program. He continues, “The work of the CTSA program and its 62 sites is very important and offers great opportunity to speed translation and implementation of high priority clinical trials.”

Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

MEDIA CONTACT: To interview Dr. Khosla about modernizing the clinical trial system, please contact Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

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Jan 7, 2014 by @colettegallagher · View  

Childhood Fractures May Indicate Bone-Density Problems

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Jan. 7, 2014 — Broken bones may seem like a normal part of an active childhood. About 1 in 3 otherwise healthy children suffers a bone fracture. Breakage of the bone running from the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist (distal forearm fracture) is the most common. It occurs most often during the growth spurt that children typically undergo in early adolescence.

But a recent study at Mayo Clinic, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, indicates that certain types of fractures may have implications for a child's long-term bone health. The study found evidence that children and adolescents whose forearm fractures occurred due to mild trauma had lower bone strength compared to other children. Lower bone strength may predispose children to factures resulting from weakened bone (osteoporotic fracture) later in life. [...]

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Nov 11, 2013 by @colettegallagher · View  

Ethics Expert Named Director of Mayo Clinic Biomedical Ethics Program

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Richard Sharp, Ph.D., joins Mayo Clinic as director of the newly-formed Mayo Clinic Biomedical Ethics Program. Dr. Sharp and his team help researchers, physicians and patients address ethical questions brought about by advances in biology and medicine.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT:: Video of Dr. Sharp is available for download on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Dr. Sharp leads the ethics activities within the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized MedicineCenter for Regenerative Medicine,Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery and the Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

"My goal for the new program is to provide institutional and national leadership on ethical issues raised by translational research and new developments in patient care," says Dr. Sharp.

The Biomedical Ethics Program includes bioethics research, institutional service and bioethics consultation, education, and bioethics programming and outreach.

Dr. Sharp comes to Mayo Clinic from Cleveland Clinic, where he served as the Director of Bioethics Research and Co-Director of the Center for Genetic Research Ethics and Law at Case Western Reserve University, one of six National Institutes of Health (NIH) Centers of Excellence in Ethics Research.

Dr. Sharp published widely on topics in biomedical ethics, including clinical ethics consultation, informed consent, financial conflicts of interest, and ethical tensions in patient advocacy. His current research is examining how patients and health care providers view new forms of personalized medicine and clinical interventions enabled by molecular diagnosis. Dr. Sharp frequently advises health care organizations on ethical issues and has served on advisory committees for the NIH, Institute of Medicine, American College of Medical Genetics, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, visit MayoClinic.com or MayoClinic.org/news.

Journalists can become a member of the Mayo Clinic News Network for the latest health, science and research news and access to video, audio, text and graphic elements that can be downloaded or embedded.

Media Contact: Colette Gallagher, 507-284-5005 (days), [email protected]

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Jul 30, 2012 by @colettegallagher · View  

Mayo Clinic Health System Receives Grant to Improve Rural Health Care

ROCHESTER, Minn. — July 30, 2012.   Mayo Clinic Health System Practice-Based Research Network (PBRN) is sharing in an $11 million government grant to lead the creation of a national learning collaborative among rural health care providers. The effort is part of a national partnership using the Health Care Innovation Award funded by the Affordable Care Act.

Illustration of stethoscope and heart monitor

"This is a great opportunity for us to share health care knowledge and best practices with our colleagues to improve health care in rural communities nationally," says Paul Targonski, M.D., Ph.D., who leads the Mayo PBRN. "It's also a great important way for us to learn from our partners' expertise and experiences in rural health care, as well as leverage research to help solve the nation's health care problems."

The network is partnering with rural clinics and communities to help them work together to deliver better health care. It is leading the efforts within the grant to create and evaluate the outcomes of sustainable local learning collaboratives that will drive health practice improvements.

Partners in the project include Mineral Regional Health Center, Superior, Mont.; The Appalachian Osteopathic Postgraduate Training Institute Consortium, Pikeville, Ky.; iVantage Health Analytics, Portland, Maine; and Montana's frontier and rural health care communities. The specific award, the "Frontier Medicine Better Health Partnership," is intended to develop and implement a network to standardize operations and efficiencies across Montana's medical practices, including tertiary care centers, critical access hospitals, and rural health clinics. Training will be provided to participating sites, and support will include health improvement specialists, electronic health record specialists and data analysis.

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