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3 days ago by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Plans Residential Mental Illness Recovery Care Option

Female celebrating life in a beautiful sunset
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic plans to build a pair of adjacent residential recovery homes across from Mayo Clinic Hospital – Saint Marys Campus in Rochester for adults with mental illness. The homes and the services offered there are designed for individuals living with mental illness who are stable and have a desire to succeed in their recovery but need additional support to learn how to manage their illness. Staff members will offer residents on-site, around-the-clock support in a supervised environment structured to support personalized treatment and community involvement.

These residences are being made possible through a generous gift to Mayo Clinic from The Sylvan C. Herman Foundation, founder of ClearView Communities, a residential rehabilitation program for adults with mental illness in Frederick, Maryland. They will be named in memory of Sylvan Herman’s son and collectively be known as the John E. Herman House in collaboration with ClearView Communities.

The John E. Herman House will be located on property Mayo Clinic owns along 14th Avenue Southwest across from the Saint Marys Campus. With this location, the homes’ residents will have convenient access to outpatient treatment programs of Mayo Clinic's Department of Psychiatry and Psychology located in the Generose Building. Each home will host 6 to 10 residents and will share an on-site treatment space.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

“The residents of these homes will be individuals who are investing in their health, so they can be good neighbors and contribute to their communities,” says Mark Frye, M.D., chair, Mayo Clinic Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. “This new facility will help extend Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary care team model into a residential home setting. Physicians, nurses, occupational therapists, mental health technicians and social workers will be involved with onsite residential care support for the home’s residents and the delivery of seamless and appropriate care. This new recovery care option will help extend Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary care team model into a residential setting.”

The program will use principles and treatment models developed by ClearView Communities, paired with Mayo Clinic’s knowledge and expertise, to offer a comfortable home environment to promote healing and help residents prepare for independent living. Residents will participate in activities that support community inclusion, including work, school and volunteering.

“Mayo Clinic will support individuals and their ongoing care with this program as there is an unmet need for this kind of residential care,” said Brian Palmer, M.D., Mayo Clinic psychiatrist and John E. Herman House medical director. “We believe providing patients with resources like this in a residential setting like this will lead to better outcomes and ultimately help them in their recovery.”

Formal construction plans and timelines are being determined.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic, or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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Dec 8, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Potential Biomarkers for Bipolar I Disorder

test tubes 16 x 9

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered a series of proteins that could be diagnostic markers to identify bipolar I disorder. If this discovery sample can be validated through replication these markers may help as a diagnostic tool for psychiatrists treating mood disorders. The findings appear in the journal Translational Psychiatry.

“The potential of having a biological test to help accurately diagnose bipolar disorder would make a huge difference to medical practice,” says Mark Frye, M.D., head of psychiatry and psychology at Mayo Clinic and first author of the study. “It would then help clinicians to choose the most appropriate treatment for hard-to-diagnose individuals.”

Up to now psychiatrists have relied on observed symptoms and patient assessments based on interviews. That information is then compared to established diagnostic criteria. In contrast to other medical conditions – such as heart attack or cancer – there is no biological marker in mood disorders in general, bipolar disorder in particular, to help confirm clinical diagnosis. It is critical to differentiate bipolar disorder from other mood disorders as the treatments differ and a medication suited to one condition may be dangerous to patients with another.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Frye are available in the downloads.

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Dec 1, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Physicians and Burnout: It’s Getting Worse

burnout 16 x 9

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Burnout among U.S. physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. These dimensions remained largely unchanged among U.S. workers in general, resulting in a widening gap between physicians and U.S. workers in other fields. The study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers in partnership with the American Medical Association compared data from 2014 to metrics they collected in 2011 and found that now more than half of U.S. physicians are experiencing professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

“Burnout manifests as emotional exhaustion, loss of meaning in work, and feelings of ineffectiveness,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., “What we found is that more physicians in almost every specialty are feeling this way and that’s not good for them, their families, the medical profession, or patients.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Nov 30, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Launches New Web Concept for its Research Magazine

Screen Shot 1 2015-11-23 at 3.14.11 PM

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic has developed and launched a new concept for Discovery’s Edge, its research magazine. The new approach adds videos, animations, medical imagery, weekly news briefs, and news features, while maintaining its longstanding appeal to thousands of readers interested in medical discoveries and emerging research. Discovery’s Edge continues its popular in-depth articles on medical research written by some of the nation’s top science writers. The new platform complements the print and digital magazine versions, which appear twice annually, and replaces an online presence that began in 2004. In 2016, a Spanish language edition will be available.

“Today’s research determines tomorrow’s medical treatments,” says Gregory Gores, M.D., Mayo Clinic’s executive dean for Research. “Discovery’s Edge is our messenger, telling our story on behalf of the thousands on our research teams working to find those solutions.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Nov 23, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Featured on National Geographic “Breakthrough” Series

“The universal fascination and anxiety that we all feel around this subject is what gives it its power.” - Ron Howard, director of Breakthrough - The Age of Aging

BREAKTHROUGH_AGING_PR_DIGITAL_PC1

How to age but keep your health? Can science reverse aging? Those are just two of the questions Oscar-winning director Ron Howard will investigate when he hosts the documentary series Breakthrough on the National Geographic channel on Sunday November 29, 9 pm EST/8 pm CST. The segment focuses on Mayo Clinic’s Kogod Center on Aging and features gerontology researcher James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D.

The production team spent a week on Mayo’s Rochester, Minnesota campus last spring, interviewing researchers, physicians and residents of retirement communities about optimal ways to make the most out of one’s later years. Expect to hear about possible aging interventions at the cellular level and what that may mean for lifespan and “healthspan.”

Download and view a segment of the program on Mayo research.

Aging is the leading risk factor for most chronic diseases, including stroke, heart disease, cancer, dementia, osteoporosis, arthritis, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, blindness and frailty. Research discoveries being made at the Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging suggest that aging may actually be a modifiable risk factor — aging doesn't have to increase the risk of disease and disability.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Nov 12, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify New Diabetes Risk Mechanism

diabetes and regenerative medicine

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic have discovered an unexpected effect from a gene known to increase diabetes risk. They assumed the specific allele in the gene TCF7L2 which increases the risk of type 2 diabetes impairs insulin production in response to increased insulin resistance.
Some slight evidence of that was found, but more significantly the researchers discovered that this variant impaired a person’s ability to balance blood sugar (glucose) by suppressing glucagon – the hormone that raises the level of glucose in the bloodstream. The findings appear in the journal Diabetes.

“This was surprising. It demonstrates a completely novel mechanism of predisposition to diabetes that could lead to novel therapies,” says Adrian Vella, M.D., Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and senior author of the study. “Ultimately, this sheds new light on how this gene actually predisposes to diabetes.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Nov 10, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Experts Advise Caution with New Cholesterol Drugs- PCSK-9 Inhibitors

In a viewpoint released today in The Journal of the American Medical Association Cardiovascular Special Issue, Mayo Clinic endocrinologists and researchers are warning against the “premature and widespread adoption” of a new type of drug that reduces cholesterol, PCSK-9 inhibitors.the word cholesterol on a scale or meter reader They argue that little is known about their long-term safety and efficacy on outcomes that matter to patients. Given the long track record of efficacy and safety and the low cost of statins, they think that it is premature to adopt PCSK-9 inhibitors as alternatives to statins.

The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved the new class of drugs for patients with high LDL-cholesterol who also have familial hypercholesterolemia or with clinical cardiovascular disease who are seeking secondary prevention or cannot tolerate statins. The Mayo experts are predicting four situations that will fuel abandoning statins in favor of the PCSK-9 inhibitors:

  • Patients who have muscle problems or other symptoms suggestive of statin intolerance.
  • Patients who have a heart attack or a stroke while using a statin.
  • Patients who may not to be taking statins every day.
  • Patients who have cholesterol levels that remain high despite statins.

Media Contact: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Drs. Montori and Rodriguez-Gutierrez are available in the downloads.

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Sep 28, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Decision Aids Help Patients with Depression and Doctors Feel Better About Medication

Choosing the right antidepressant can be a daunting task. With so many choices and such unpredictability in their individual effects, patients with depression often spend months or years casting about for the right medication, while clinicians are often uneasy or unwilling to offer options other than their preferred prescriptions.Dr. Victor Montori talking with patient

A new study from Mayo Clinic shows that a simple series of conversation cards can dramatically improve both the patient’s and their physician’s satisfaction with the discussion on and comfort with the choice of antidepressant. The findings appear in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

“We worked closely with patients, their families, and clinicians to fully understand what really matters to them when confronted with this situation. We wanted to transform the too-often unavailable evidence into accurate, easily accessible information to be used within the context of each person’s needs and preferences, ultimately creating what we hope to be meaningful conversations,” says Annie LeBlanc, Ph.D., first author and Mayo Clinic health science researcher.

Media Contact: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sep 21, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Five Ways Individualized Medicine is Impacting Health Care

Rochester, Minn. — How is individualized medicine working? Let us count the ways.

That’s just what Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., did this morning in his opening keynote at the 4th annual Individualizing Medicine Conference. The core of his talk highlighted five areas in which the knowledge and know-how from the human genome will be most impactful in patient care, not just at Mayo Clinic, but anywhere in the nation and globally.

“What’s in it for you?” he asked the crowd of health providers at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester,
Minn. “Individualized or precision medicine offers help for your medical practice today. You can take advantage of these advances to help your patients, to better diagnose, treat or prevent illness right now.” Here is his short list of “value adds” to the practice of medicine. There are many more, but these are the most pervasive and applicable at the moment.

Journalists: B-roll of the conference and sound bites with Dr. Farrugia and Dr. Stewart are available in the downloads.

Media Contact: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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jonholten

jonholten responded Sep 25, 2015 · View

Good stuff, Bob. Sure makes me want to know more.

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bobnellis

Sep 16, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

MEDIA ADVISORY: Telling the Stories of Precision Medicine at Mayo Clinic’s 4th International Individualized Medicine Conference

Exhibitors space

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Precision or individualized medicine is at the core of a major White House initiative. It is a major focus of the National Institutes of Health. It is changing medical practice on a daily basis.

Beginning on September 20th, Mayo Clinic will be helping health care providers understand the new tools offered by genomic medicine and how those offerings are helping patients today. Dozens of experts will be on hand in the only annual conference of its kind. More than 800 took part in 2014. This year there are more stories to be told and results explained, from cancer treatments to mystery diagnoses to safer, more accurate medicines. More than 120 speakers will cover all aspects of this transformational field in the four days.

The conference kicks off Sunday afternoon with an overview of medical genomics aimed at the general public, Individualized Medicine in Health Care: What Does it Mean for Me?

Keynote speakers:

  • Mayo Clinic Vice President Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., will encompass what the field has achieved and predict where it is going.
  • The man who mapped the human genome (J. Craig Venter, Ph.D. ) will share his perspective via satellite on Tuesday morning.

Moderator: Broadcast journalist and on air host Cathy Wurzer of Minnesota Public Radio

WHO: Host A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., director, Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

WHAT: Individualizing Medicine 2015

WHERE: Rochester Mayo Civic Center

WHEN: September 20-23

MEDIA CONTACT:
 For interview opportunities or conference attendance, please contact Bob Nellis at 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Aug 18, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic joins Illumina, Warburg Pincus, and Sutter Hill Ventures to form Helix to Accelerate Consumer Adoption of Genomics

Individualized Medicine Clinic

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — August 18, 2015—Illumina, Inc. (NASDAQ: ILMN), Warburg Pincus and Sutter Hill Ventures announced today that they have formed a company to empower consumers to discover insights into their own genomes through a vibrant ecosystem of high-quality content partners. The company, called Helix, is based in the San Francisco Bay Area and received financing commitments in excess of $100 million. Jay Flatley, CEO of Illumina, will serve as Chairman of the Board.

Helix will enable individuals to acquire an unprecedented amount of genetic information by providing affordable sequencing and database services for consumer samples brought through third party partners, driving the creation of an ecosystem of consumer applications. After being sequenced, individuals will be able to manage their data and explore an open marketplace of on-demand applications, provided by Helix’s partners, to gain additional insights into the genomic data that has already been acquired. By converting genetic information to digital data stored in the cloud, Helix enables its partners to develop and deliver premium genomic products to consumers without the burden of developing their own assay, laboratory, or database infrastructure. [...]

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Jul 30, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Cost-effective addition to mammography in detecting cancer in dense breast tissue

ROCHESTER, Minn. – For women with dense breast tissue, supplementing standard mammography with a new imaging technique called molecular breast imaging (MBI) can lower the cost of diagnosis of breast cancers, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine found that adding MBI to mammography of women with dense breast tissue increased the costs of diagnosis 3.2 times, compared to costs of mammography alone, and nearly quadrupled the rate of cancer detection. Because the supplemental test found more cancer, screening with a combination of mammography and MBI saved $8,254 per cancer detected.

While mammography is still the standard tool for widespread breast cancer screening, it is now known to perform less effectively in women with dense breast tissue. Both tumors and normal dense breast tissue can appear white on a mammogram, making tumors hard to detect. Nearly half of all women over age 40 have mammograms classified as “dense,” according to Carrie Hruska, Ph.D., a medical physicist in the Mayo Clinic Department of Radiology and the study’s lead author. Supplemental screening techniques like MBI address a significant need for better cancer detection methods for this patient population.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Hruska are in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis and Shea Jennings, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Jul 15, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Repairing Fatal Mutations Behind Mitochondrial Disease

A multidisciplinary team of researchers has eliminated fatal mitochondrial DNA mutations in stem cells from patients with mitochondrial diseasesAbstract DNA, futuristic molecule, cell illustration.The study is published in today's online issue of Nature as a collaboration between some of the nation's top institutions and Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Mitochondrial diseases are a particular struggle for patients and their families as treatment options are limited, something made more dire as many of those affected are children. Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Medicine, explains: "These are life threatening conditions where standard care is limited to alleviating symptoms of disease. Our proof-of-concept study shows that functionally corrected stem cells can be generated from these patients, providing initial steps towards regenerative therapy for mitochondrial disease.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Read: Research paper in Nature

Read: Oregon Health & Science University News Release

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May 13, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic to Study 10,000 Patients for Drug-Gene Safety

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Mayo Clinic, in collaboration with Baylor College of Medicine, is planning to launch a study of 10,000 Mayo biobank members for potential risk of drug reactions or lack of drug effect based on each individual’s genome.Logotipo del Centro para Medicina Personalizada Researchers will be sequencing the DNA of the biobank members for 69 different genes that can influence how patients’ metabolize or react to different drugs. The goal is to determine which “pharmacogenomic” findings are relevant to that individual patient and to insert that information into their medical records – providing an “early warning system” to prevent adverse drug reactions or ineffective treatments.

“This is a huge step toward bringing knowledge of pharmacogenomics into patient care,” says Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., Pharmacogenomics Program Director at Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine and the Mary Lou and John H. Dasburg Professor of Cancer Genomics. “Most importantly, it has the potential of preventing errors and identifying the most appropriate drugs and individualized treatments for thousands of patients – thanks to research on the human genome.”

Media Contact: Bob Nellis at Mayo Clinic Public Affairs: 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Apr 22, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Asthma Discovery May Lead to New Therapeutic Approach

Embargoed: Do not release before 2:00 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time, April 22, 2015

Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have discovered a key cellular mechanism that contributes to bronchoconstriction and inflammation in asthma. Their studies may lead to a novel, effective asthma therapy for patients. The findings appear in the journal Science Translational Medicine.illustration of healthy lung and airway, airway with mucous membrane and buildup

The team of researchers from Mayo Clinic, Cardiff University in Wales, King’s College London, the University of Manchester and the Open University in the United Kingdom, as well as the University of California San Francisco, showed that elevated extracellular calcium as well as other internal chemicals released in asthma can activate a “calcium-sensing receptor” (CaSR) on airway cells. The researchers found that CaSR expression is increased in asthma, and contributes to enhanced bronchoconstriction and inflammation that is typically seen in asthma. Importantly, they found that the effects of CaSR can be reversed by CaSR antagonists, also called calcilytics.

Media Contact: Bob Nellis at Mayo Clinic Public Affairs: 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Apr 8, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Effective Leadership: One Remedy for Physician Burnout

Burnout is a common problem among U.S. doctors and studies suggest it adversely impacts quality of care and patient satisfaction. Many factors impact how physicians perceive their career. A new study suggests there’s an interesting correlation between physician burnout and the effectiveness of their supervisors. That’s what researchers found at Mayo Clinic when they undertook a large internal study on the satisfaction of physicians and the leadership qualities of their supervisors. The findings appear today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

 “We found that at the work-group level, 11 percent of the variation in burnout and 50 percent of the variation in satisfaction among physicians was attributable to the leadership behaviors of their supervisor,” says Tait Shanafelt, M.D., Mayo researcher and first author of the study. “The behaviors of physician supervisors have a direct impact on the personal well-being of the physicians they lead.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Shanafelt are available in the downloads.

Media Contact: Bob Nellis at Mayo Clinic Public Affairs: 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Apr 7, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Minnesota Partnership Awards Six New Research Grants

medical team working in research lab

New treatments for cancer and heart disease dominate the 2015 research awards recently announced by the Minnesota Partnership for Biotechnology and Medical Genomics. The state-supported funding was distributed among six research teams, based on competitive applications. Each team represents researchers from Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota. A seventh grant was also awarded to help support commercialization of a research finding previously funded by the Partnership.University of Minnesota Research Partnership Logo

“These are seed grants, aimed at providing innovative researchers the means to get a scientific project off the ground and on the way toward a possible new treatment,” says Eric Wieben, Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic, program co-director for the Minnesota Partnership.

“I’m pleased that we are entering our second decade of scientific progress with so many strong projects that could potentially change how medicine is practiced,” says Tucker LeBien, Ph.D., of the University of Minnesota, program co-director.

The seven grants totaled just under $5.5 million.

Media Contacts:
Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic 507-284-5005 
Holly Ziemer, University of Minnesota 612-626-7037

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Mar 24, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis Launches New TB Journal

The Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis,  a regional training and consultation center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn, is today launching a new medical journal, the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases. The online journal is published by Elsevier.cover of Clinical Tuberculosis magazine

“We believe that the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases fills an unmet need by providing a platform for the dissemination of the results of clinically relevant research,” say the editors in their inaugural editorial for the publication. They also cite the continue spread of tuberculosis as a global health problem, making it the second greatest cause of death from infectious diseases after HIV.

“We are very excited that we are launching this journal on World TB Day and hope that it will effectively advance new knowledge that will ultimately help end this terrible disease,” says Editor-in-Chief Zelalem Temesgen, M.D [Za-La-Lum Tah-mezg-in]. Two other Mayo Clinic physician-researchers, Stacey Rizza, M.D. and John Wilson, M.D., will serve as associate editors. All three are members of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Mayo Clinic and members of the tuberculosis center. An editorial board composed of leading experts in the field from around the globe has already been established to help advance the journal's mission.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Mar 9, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic and Collaborators Find New Class of Drugs that Reduces Aging in Mice

A new class of drugs identified and validated by Mayo Clinic researchers along with collaborators at Scripps Research Institute and others, clearly reduces health problems in mice by limiting the effect of senescent cells — cells that contribute to frailty and diseases associated with age. The researchers say this is a first step toward developing similar treatments for aging patients. Their findings appear today in the journal Aging Cell.

 “If translatable to humans — which makes sense as we were using human cells in many of the tests – this type of therapy could keep the effects of aging at bay and significantly extend the healthspan of patients,” says James Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Mayo Clinic Kogod Center on Aging and senior author of the study.two senior citizens, elderly couple walking down a road or path

 The drugs — called senolytics — selectively kill senescent cells without harming nearby cells and tissue, to reduce heart and vascular problems, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, and neurological problems. Senescent cells are cells that appear with aging and at sites of many age-related diseases. They produce factors that can damage the cells and tissues around them and at a distance, amplifying their effects. In many examples, the drugs caused significant and visible reduction of multiple conditions after just one dose – and remained therapeutic for up to seven months. The researchers say that this long lasting effect is consistent with a change in cellular or tissue composition.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Jan 21, 2015 by bobnellis · View  

Mayo Clinic to host Science Conference for area students on Jan. 27

Researchers working in labMayo Clinic researchers have invited approximately 200 area eighth grade and high school students to the 16th Biennial Celebration of Research, a daylong conference for students interested in learning about careers in science.

The keynote address, "Harnessing Viruses to Attack Cancer," will be presented by Eva Galanis, M.D., a professor of oncology and chair of the Department of Molecular Medicine at Mayo Clinic. This year's theme, "Going Viral," pertains to Dr. Galanis’ research and clinical efforts on using modified viruses to develop novel therapeutics for cancer treatment.

Students are scheduled to attend from Albert Lea, Altura, Austin, Blooming Prairie, Caledonia, Chatfield, Dover, Elgin, Eyota, Faribault, Grand Meadow, Houston, Kasson, Kenyon, Lanesboro, Lewiston, Lyle, Mantorville, Mazeppa, Millville, Northfield, Owatonna, Peterson, Pine Island, Plainview, Rochester, Rushford, Southland, Stewartville, Winona and Zumbrota. [...]

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