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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis)

Activity by Bob Nellis

Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Thu, Jun 12 11:24am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Discover New Form of Cancer

Potentially disfiguring facial tumor caused by chromosomal chimera

ROCHESTER, Minn. — This is the story of two perfectly harmless genes. By themselves, PAX3 and MAML3 don’t cause any problems. However, when they combine during an abnormal but recurring chromosomal mismatch, they can be dangerous. The result is a chimera — a gene that is half of each — and that causes biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma. The tumor usually begins in the nose and may infiltrate the rest of the face, requiring disfiguring surgery to save the individual. Because Mayo Clinic pathology researchers have now described the molecular makeup of the rare tumor, several existing cancer drugs may be targeted against it. The findings appear in the current issue of Nature Genetics.

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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Thu, Jun 12 11:49am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researcher: Personal Resiliency Paramount for Future Disasters

Close-up of word disasterROCHESTER, Minn. — A Mayo Clinic researcher says individuals need to build disaster readiness and resiliency in order to better recover from the effects of earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires and other natural disasters. Those who prepare well for disasters are more likely to have a sense of spiritual and emotional well-being and be satisfied with their life. Those findings appear in the journal Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.

Health scientist and geologist Monica Gowan, Ph.D., says how well people are prepared for adversity through the presence of meaning and purpose in their lives can play a positive role in how well they manage the uncertainties of disaster risk and recover from devastating experiences to regain health and quality of life.

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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Wed, Jun 4 9:01am · View  

Mayo Clinic Moves Small-Molecule Drugs Through Blood-Brain Barrier

brain imageROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic have demonstrated in a mouse model that their recently developed synthetic peptide carrier is a potential delivery vehicle for brain cancer chemotherapy drugs and other neurological medications. The findings appear in PLOS ONE.

“Not only have we shown that we can transport eight different molecules, we think this method will be less disruptive or invasive because it mimics a normal physiological process,” says Mayo Clinic neuroscientist Gobinda Sarkar, Ph.D., the corresponding author of the study. The researchers are able to transport the drugs without modifying any of the molecules involved. They say this development will aid in evaluation of potential new drugs for brain cancer.

The blood-brain barrier is meant to protect the brain from numerous undesirable chemicals circulating in the body, but it also obstructs access for treatment of brain tumors and other conditions. Too often the only recourse is invasive, which often limits a drug’s effectiveness or causes irreversible damage to an already damaged brain. Nearly all of the drugs that could potentially help are too large to normally pass through the barrier. Additionally, other methods may damage the vascular system.
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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Wed, May 14 9:54am · View  

Mayo Clinic First to Show Virotherapy is Promising Against Multiple Myeloma (pkg)

ROCHESTER, Minn. — May 14, 2014 — In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 

Click here to listen to the July 12th Mayo Clinic Radio program featuring Dr. Russell and Stacy Erholtz

Journalists: The video package and extra b-roll are available in the downloads. The video package script, including intro and anchor tags, is available here.

Two patients in the study received a single intravenous dose of an engineered measles virus (MV-NIS) that is selectively toxic to myeloma plasma cells. Both patients responded, showing reduction of both bone marrow cancer and myeloma protein. One patient, a 49-year-old woman, experienced complete remission of myeloma and has been clear of the disease for over six months.

“This is the first study to establish the feasibility of systemic oncolytic virotherapy for disseminated cancer,” says Stephen Russell, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic hematologist, first author of the paper and co-developer of the therapy. “These patients were not responsive to other therapies and had experienced several recurrences of their disease.”

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow, which also causes skeletal or soft tissue tumors. This cancer usually responds to immune system-stimulating drugs, but eventually overcomes them and is rarely cured.
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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Thu, Apr 24 1:16pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Uncovers a Crucial Tumor Suppression Function of p53, the Most Commonly Mutated Gene in Human Cancers

Cancer word cloud - black and whiteROCHESTER, Minn. — April 24, 2014 — Mayo Clinic researchers have uncovered a novel tumor suppressive role for p53, a cancer-critical gene that is mutated in more than half of all cancers found in humans. The researchers found that loss of p53 function caused overproduction of the kinase Aurora A, an enzyme involved in the process of cell division. That overproduction leads to mitotic spindle malformation and aberrant separation of duplicated chromosomes over daughter cells, a phenomenon that predicts tumor metastasis and poor patient outcomes. The findings appear in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

Normal human cells have 46 chromosomes. It has long been recognized that developing cancer cells reshuffle their chromosomes and, more recently, that chromosome-number abnormalities help transform normal cells into cancerous cells that metastasize and resist treatment. [...]

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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Wed, Apr 23 12:07pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Finds Biomarker for Fuchs Dystrophy, and More

Presentations at Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

Close-up high-tech image of human eye. Technology concept

ROCHESTER, Minn. — April 23, 2014 — Mayo Clinic ophthalmology researchers have found a likely indicator of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy. Following up on a genome-wide association study, Keith Baratz, M.D., and others discovered no single genomic variant that caused Fuchs, but found that a repeated noncoding trinucleotide sequence correlated with the condition in patients 68 percent of the time.

The findings will be presented on the afternoon of May 4 at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual conference in Orlando, Fla. (Poster 1003-A0392) [...]

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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Tue, Mar 25 1:44pm · View  

Discovery’s Edge Online Issue

DE_Ipad_CoverROCHESTER, Minn. — The latest online issue of Discovery's Edge, Mayo Clinic's research magazine, highlights three programs at Mayo Clinic that have changed medicine and the physician/researchers responsible. You may cite and link to this publication as often as you wish. Republication is allowed with proper attribution. Please include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit Discovery's Edge for subscription information.

Discover our iPad Issue, download the app:
https://itunes.apple.com/app/mayo-clinic-de/id471972510?mt=8 [...]

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Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Wed, Feb 26 1:10pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Discovers African-Americans Respond Better to Rubella Vaccine

Findings May Help Make Immunizations More Effective 

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Feb. 27, 2014 — Somali Americans develop twice the antibody response to rubella from the current vaccine compared to Caucasians in a new Mayo Clinic study on individualized aspects of immune response. A non-Somali, African-American cohort ranked next in immune response, still significantly higher than Caucasians, and Hispanic Americans in the study were least responsive to the vaccine. The findings appear in the journal Vaccine.

 “This is fascinating,” says Gregory Poland, M.D., Mayo Clinic vaccinologist and senior author of the study. “We don’t know why these groups reacted so differently to the vaccine — that’s a subject for further studies — but this new information will help us as we design the vaccines of the future. It will ultimately change how we practice medicine.”

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