Mayo Clinic News Network

News Resources

Brian Kilen (@briankilen)

Activity by Brian Kilen

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Jul 10 9:00am · View  

Mayo Clinic Announces Online Video Education for Medical Professionals

Online video lectures for medical professionals from Mayo Clinic

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic is now making its video education medical grand rounds lectures and clinical presentations on recent innovations in patient care, education and research accessible to other medical professionals in the new online medical professional video center.

medical professional videoThese lectures contain new practice procedures, treatment options and research covering a wide variety of specialties.For example, a video lecture on Choline C-11 treatment for recurrent prostate cancer describes the benefits to patients as well as the production, imaging and processing facilities necessary to provide the treatment. Another, fecal microbiota transplant, provides step-by-step details of how the procedure is completed so providers and patients can see the process from beginning to end. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Jun 30 4:39pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the June 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Here are highlights from the June issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.HealthLetter.MayoClinic.com or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter June 2014 (for journalists only).


Pros and cons of warfarin and newer anti-clotting medicationsIlustración del corazón y medicamentos

For people with atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm problem that increases the risk of stroke, there are more medication treatment choices than ever before, according to the June issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

Doctors often recommend an anti-clotting medication for patients with atrial fibrillation, which can lead to the development of blood clots in the heart. These clots can break off and travel to ― and potentially block ― an artery that supplies blood to the brain. The result is a stroke. More than 15 percent of strokes are attributed to atrial fibrillation.

For decades, the only anti-clotting medication was warfarin (Coumadin). In the last few years, three more options have become available.
[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Wed, Jun 18 3:14pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Study Reverses Current Thought on Treatment of Cirrhosis

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic released a new study reversing current thought on the treatment of cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes. The study found that the continuation of metformin after a cirrhosis diagnosis improved survival rates among diabetes patients. Metformin is usually discontinued once cirrhosis is diagnosed because of concerns about an increased risk of adverse effects associated with this treatment in patients with liver impairment. The Mayo Clinic study was recently published in Hepatology.

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver caused by forms of liver diseases, such as chronic viral hepatitis, chronic alcohol abuse and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This condition is the consequence of damage done to the liver over many years. As cirrhosis progresses, more and more scar tissue forms, impeding proper liver functions. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, May 27 11:21am · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the May 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Here are highlights from the May issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.healthletter.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: MCHL_May2014 (for journalists only).

Choosing the right time for cataract surgery

Some degree of vision clouding caused by cataracts occurs in most people as they age. But according to the May issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter, there’s no need to rush scheduling the surgery to remove the cataracts. The right time for surgery should be determined by weighing expected improvements in vision against the very slight risk of a less than ideal outcome.

There are several types of age-related cataracts with subtle differences. Except in rare instances, cataracts develop painlessly and gradually, leading to vision changes that include:picture of eyes - normal and with cataracts

  • Increasingly blurred or dim vision
  • Increasing difficulty with night vision
  • Sensitivity to bright light and glare
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Double vision in one eye

In the early stages of the disease, adjustments such as different eyeglasses, brighter lighting and wearing sunglasses to reduce glare may compensate for vision changes. When cataracts interfere with daily tasks, surgery should be considered. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Apr 10 10:07am · View  

Mayo Clinic Forms Collaboration with Enterprise Ireland to Develop Novel Technologies

Collaboration to support medical innovation, improvements in patient care and the economy

Ireland — Mayo Clinic today announced a five-year collaboration with Enterprise Ireland, the Irish enterprise development agency, to advance novel medical technologies originating from Mayo Clinic. The announcement was made this morning in Dublin by An Taoiseach Enda Kenny T.D., the prime minister of Ireland, at the Medical Device 360° conference.

Journalists: B-roll and sound bites with Mayo and Enterprise leaders are available in the downloads.

Leadership from Mayo Clinic and Enterprise Ireland CollaborationThis is a unique collaboration providing an alternative source of funding for translational medical research, especially significant at a time when U.S. funding for research is challenging to obtain. Enterprise Ireland has committed up to $16 million in the agreement.

“This collaboration bridges a financial gap for translational research,” says Greg Gores, M.D. , executive dean for research at Mayo Clinic. “It provides funding in between the early-stage basic research and the stage when a technology is ready for the marketplace. In the U.S., this stage is expensive and difficult to fund. We are providing the technologies and Enterprise Ireland the funding. Both of us are contributing to technology advancement.”

The novel medical technologies are Mayo Clinic innovations that have the potential to make it easier for patients to be diagnosed or treated. The development of one technology is already underway at National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI.G). The inventor, Vijay Singh, M.B.B.S., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, developed a device to treat acute pancreatitis, a disease in which the pancreas is rapidly damaged, causing excruciating pain and often resulting in prolonged hospitalization or sometimes death. Experts at NUI.G are currently preparing the device for human clinical trials, which will be conducted by the university. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Mar 20 1:22pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Genetic Clue to Irritable Bowel Syndrome

colon illustrationROCHESTER, Minn. — March 20, 2014 — Is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) caused by genetics, diet, past trauma, anxiety? All are thought to play a role, but now, for the first time, researchers have reported a defined genetic defect that causes a subset of IBS. The research was published in the journal Gastroenterology.

Researchers estimate that approximately 15 to 20 percent of the Western world has IBS. It is a common disorder that affects the large intestine. Most patients with the disorder commonly experience symptoms of cramping, abdominal pain, bloating gas, diarrhea and constipation. Most treatments for IBS target these symptoms.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Jan 27 2:40pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Announces Office To Strengthen Ties to Department of Defense

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Jan. 27, 2014 ― Mayo Clinic has opened the Mayo Clinic Department of Defense (DOD) Medical Research Office. The office, in Rochester, MN., is designed to be an easy to use single point of contact, linking the research needs of the DOD with Mayo Clinic investigators capable of addressing those needs, and to improve access to funding to serve DOD research and development priorities.

The office oversees Mayo Clinic's portfolio of DOD-funded research, which has evolved over Mayo’s long and successful partnership with the U.S. government. Today, dozens of Mayo Clinic researchers receive funding for special projects that use new technologies and innovative solutions to support military readiness, functional restoration and rehabilitation after complex injuries, restore health and improve wellness of military populations.

“This is a continuation of Mayo Clinic’s 150-year legacy with the DOD,” says Peter Amadio, M.D., director of the office, and an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic. “The office and website are designed to strengthen this long-standing relationship and to not only match DOD research needs with the expertise of Mayo Clinic, but also accelerate the entire process from proposal development to funding to delivery of a completed project. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Wed, Nov 13 2013 · View  

Microbiome Changed by Gluten Increases Incidences of Type 1 Diabetes, say Mayo Clinic Researchers

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Research has shown that the intestinal microbiome plays a large role in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Now, researchers at Mayo Clinic have demonstrated that gluten in the diet may modify the intestinal microbiome, increasing incidences of Type 1 diabetes. The research was published Nov. 13, in the journal PLOS ONE.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Click here to retrieve video and photography from the Mayo Clinic News Network.

These researchers demonstrated that mice fed a gluten-free diet had a dramatically reduced incidence of Type 1 diabetes. These mice were non-obese diabetic mice, or mice that grow to develop Type 1 diabetes. The gluten-free diet worked to protect the mice against Type 1 diabetes. When the researchers added gluten back into the diets of mice it reversed the protective effect the gluten free diet had provided. There also was a measurable impact of the gluten on the bacterial flora of the mice that might be one way in which gluten could affect the risk for diabetes.

"These changes suggest that the presence of gluten is directly responsible for the diabetes-creating effects of diet and determines the gut microflora," says Govindarajan Rajagopalan, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic immunologist and study author.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Load More    

Loading information...