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Brian Kilen (@briankilen)

Activity by Brian Kilen

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Jan 15 4:44pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Signs Joint Venture Agreement with Hillhouse Capital Group

China collaboration with Hillhouse Capital strengthens Mayo Clinic’s mission to improve health care worldwide

Paul Limburg, M.D.

Paul Limburg, M.D.

Today, Mayo Clinic announced it has entered into a joint venture agreement with Hillhouse Capital to advance the quality of health care in China. By combining Mayo Clinic’s patient care, medical research and education with Hillhouse’s China expertise and healthcare industry partnerships, the collaboration establishes a new company to improve health care delivery and efficiency in China.

“We are excited to collaborate with Hillhouse to provide Mayo Clinic knowledge and guidance to improve the quality of health care to the people of China,” said Paul Limburg, M.D., Medical Director, Mayo Clinic Global Business Solutions. “Our collaboration with Hillhouse extends Mayo Clinic’s reach and is at the core of Mayo Clinic’s mission to inspire hope and healing to people everywhere.”

The new venture benefits from recent policy changes by Chinese regulators to encourage private investment in health care. Mayo Clinic and Hillhouse believe that this collaboration presents a unique opportunity to leverage Mayo Clinic’s valuable capabilities in medical technology and management and Hillhouse’s strong in-country knowledge to deliver high-quality health care services to Chinese healthcare providers and patients. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, Dec 23 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the December 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Here are highlights from the December issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://healthletter.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter December 2014 (for journalists only).

Myths and facts about how medications affect older adults

pills for mchlOlder adults need to be especially vigilant about drug safety, according to the December issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. That’s because older adults are more likely to be taking more than one medication at a time. Interactions between drugs can cause side effects that might not occur if a drug were taken alone. And, physical changes in older adults can alter both the effectiveness of a medication and side effects, compared with what a younger adult might experience. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, Dec 9 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic and Techstars to Offer New Program Techstars++ to Health Care Entrepreneurs

Mayo Clinic hosting immersion program for innovative medical startups accelerating advances in patient care

ROCHESTER, Minn., — Mayo Clinic announced today a new collaboration with Techstars to offer the Techstars++ program. The Techstars++ program will bring together health care entrepreneurs and companies with Mayo Clinic to find innovative solutions to improve patient care at an accelerated pace. Mayo Clinic is the first to participate in this new program.

Techstars is a mentorship-driven accelerator program with a track record of helping to develop businesses, especially technology startups. The Techstars++ program offers companies from the Techstars portfolio of 500 alumni companies the opportunity to extend their Techstars experience by spending time on-site and engaging deeply with a corporation/organization - Mayo Clinic in this initial program. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Dec 1 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Cardiologist Wins GSK’s Discovery Fast Track Challenge to Investigate Anti-hypertensive Agents

John Burnett Jr., M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, has been selected as a winner of GSK’s 2014 Discovery Fast Track Challenge, which is designed to accelerate the translation of academic research into novel therapies. Dr. Burnett will work with scientists in GSK’s Discovery Partnerships with Academia (DPAc) and the Molecular Discovery Research teams to test their hypotheses and screen targets against GSK’s compound collection.

John Burnett Jr., MD

John Burnett Jr., MD

Active compounds could then form the basis of full drug discovery programs that may ultimately lead to innovative medicines for anti-hypertensive agents.

Dr. Burnett submitted one of 14 winning proposals, chosen from 428 entries from 234 universities and academic institutes from across 26 countries. Research between Mayo Clinic and GSK will focus on treatments for resistant hypertension.

“We see this as a huge need, clinically, and we think our screen could lead to a breakthrough drug for the treatment of resistant hypertension, which is growing worldwide,” said Dr. Burnett. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Wed, Nov 19 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the November 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Here are highlights from the November issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.healthletter.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter November 2014 (for journalists only). Full special report text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter Special Report November 2014 (for journalists only).

New approaches for relief from irritable bowel syndrome

There are new approaches to manage the frustrating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the November issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

illustration of normal pancreas and related anatomyIBS is a common disorder of the large intestine (colon), characterized by abdominal pain that occurs before or along with diarrhea or constipation. Symptoms can vary widely. For many people, flares of diarrhea may last for a few days followed by periods of remission. Constipation may last for days or even months, along with intermittent diarrhea or normal bowel function. A small number of people with severe IBS have unbearable pain that is constant at times.

Multiple factors may contribute to the bowel dysfunction. The foundation of IBS therapy is developing lifestyle, exercise and diet changes that generally facilitate smooth bowel function. Treatment often includes working with a physician or other care provider to develop a plan for regular exercise and management of stress, anxiety and other psychological factors. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Fri, Oct 17 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the October 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Here are highlights from the October issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://healthletter.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter October 2014 (for journalists only).

No exaggeration: Sitting is the new smokingshutterstock_33084607

The new health phrase, “Sitting is the new smoking,” is not an exaggeration, according to the October issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Most people don’t smoke, but everyone sits — and most sit too long each day. Many U.S. workers sit for 15 hours a day.

In the past 15 years, a wave of research has shed new light on sitting as a serious health risk, even in those of normal weight and who routinely exercise. Thirty-four chronic conditions and illnesses have been associated with excess sitting. One recent study compared adults who spent less than two hours a day watching television with those who spent more than four hours a day doing so. After adjusting for obesity, age and other risk factors, those with higher screen time had: [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, Sep 30 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the September 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Here are highlights from the September issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.HealthLetter.MayoClinic.com or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter September 2014 (for journalists only).

Medical staff in operating room performing surgeryAfter celebrating, survivors often face anxieties and fear

Adjusting from being a cancer patient to a cancer survivor isn't just about celebration and gratitude. The September issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter covers why this transition isn’t always smooth or easy. In addition to dealing with fatigue or other side effects of surgery or treatment, patients may be surprised by feelings that can include fear and uncertainty, anxiety, sadness and irritability.

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, Sep 9 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic and Delos®, the Pioneer of Wellness Real Estate™, Announce Agreement to Establish the WELL Living Lab

Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation Collaborates with Delos® to open first of its kind lab devoted to health and wellness in the built environment

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Delos®, the Pioneer of Wellness Real Estate™, and the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation today announced their agreement to design, build and operate the newly formed WELL Living Lab — a multidisciplinary lab that will be uniquely focused on the interaction between health, wellness and the built environment. Set to debut in April 2015 adjacent to Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus in downtown Rochester, the WELL Living Lab will be the first lab exclusively committed to research, development and testing of both new and existing innovations designed to improve the health and well-being of individuals as they live and work within built environments.

Douglas Wood, M.D.

Douglas Wood, M.D.

An open-innovation ecosystem for healthy living, the WELL Living Lab will simulate realistic living and working environments, including homes, offices, schools, communities and hotels in order to test, monitor and identify the efficacy of wellness-based interventions. The lab will incorporate state-of-the-art technology and unique design elements that will create a dynamic, versatile and highly adaptable environment, allowing for a wide range of simulated real-world conditions. Delos® and Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation will co-govern the lab, which will be staffed by Mayo Clinic personnel, along with members of the Delos® team.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu
Callie Shumaker, Delos, 646-654-3438, cshumaker@nikecomm.com [...]

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