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Brian Kilen (@briankilen)

Activity by Brian Kilen

Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Aug 25 7:59am · View  

Exact Sciences Says Mayo Clinic is First Healthcare System to Offer Cologuard®

Stool-based DNA (sDNA) screening test for colorectal cancer to be available by prescription to patients

News Conference Advisory: An audio news conference was held this morning with representatives from Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic.  Click here to listen or right click to download.

MADISON, Wis., and ROCHESTER, Minn., — Exact Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) today announced that Mayo Clinic will be the first health system to offer Cologuard®, the first and only Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, noninvasive stool DNA screening test for colorectal cancer. Cologuard will be available to patients through their primary care physicians at Mayo Clinic.cologuard

Available by prescription only, Cologuard offers people 50 years and older who are at average risk for colorectal cancer an easy to use screening test which they can do in the privacy of their own home. It is the first noninvasive screening test for colorectal cancer that analyzes both stool-based DNA and blood biomarkers to detect cancer and precancer. The Cologuard technology platform was co-developed by Exact Sciences Corp. and Mayo Clinic as part of a broad, exclusive collaboration.

“Cologuard represents a significant advancement in identifying colorectal cancer at its most treatable stage. We believe offering this new tool will promote patient and community public health and may move more patients to get screened earlier—a critical step in beating this prevalent and preventable cancer,” says Vijay Shah, M.D., chair of Mayo Clinic gastroenterology and hepatology.

MEDIA CONTACT: Brian Kilen, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads.

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Aug 21 12:06pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the August 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.HealthLetter.MayoClinic.com or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter August 2014 (for journalists only). Full special report text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter Special Report August 2014 (for journalists only).

 

Hand pain not inevitable with aging

hand pain imageChronic hand pain and dysfunction aren’t inevitable aspects of aging, but hands are vulnerable to injury and degenerative conditions after years of wear and tear. The August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter includes an eight-page Special Report on Hand Pain, including common causes and strategies to alleviate, manage and even prevent hand pain.

Health concerns covered included arthritis, tendon and nerve conditions, trauma and infections. A primary care provider can treat and diagnose some hand conditions. Depending on the concern, a hand surgeon, rheumatologist, neurologist or rehabilitation specialist could be involved in treatment. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Jul 31 3:24pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the July 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Here are highlights from the July issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required.elbow pain Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.HealthLetter.MayoClinic.com or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter July 2014 (for journalists only).

Elbow pain: Quicker recovery with a health care provider

When elbow pain stops golf, tennis, gardening or household chores, it’s wise to see a doctor to determine the cause and a treatment plan. The July issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter covers common causes of elbow pain, self-care tips and why seeing a doctor sooner ― rather than later ― is a good idea.

In the absence of a bone fracture, most elbow injuries aren’t serious. But nagging pain can interfere with sports and day-to-day activities. Most elbow pain is related to overuse that results in irritation and tissue degeneration near areas where tendons connect to bones of the elbow joint. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Jul 28 4:25pm · View  

Announcing Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Online: Smart Technology Empowering Employee and Group Health and Wellness

A digital, individualized Mayo Clinic approach to better health through lifestyle and behavior change   

Rochester, Minn. — Mayo Clinic announced today a new health engagement platform called Mayo Clinic Healthy Living online. Designed for employers and other groups to help members improve and stay healthy, the platform focuses on lifestyle areas where change can have the most beneficial effect on overall health. As a result, this new solution promises positive results, not only for the individual, but for the employer/client in terms of controlling health care costs and optimizing performance and productivity. The science underpinning the platform draws upon the expertise of Mayo Clinic and leverages the new Mayo Clinic Healthy Living program as a learning lab to research and measure outcomes to improve health and wellness.

Hagen_Philip_13MMayo Clinic Healthy Living online is at the forefront of the next generation of digital wellness and lifestyle behavior change tools. The program is designed to engage members by leveraging new technologies, connectivity to remote devices, data-driven user personalization, incentive capabilities, and user-driven responsive design, all underpinned by evidence-based approaches validated though the medical practice and research at Mayo Clinic.

Mayo Clinic research was used to identify areas with the most potential to improve health. The platform focuses on diet and nutrition, physical activity, and weight management, with plans to build out stress, sleep and resiliency offerings. “What we are doing with this tool is bringing Mayo expertise outside the walls of the clinic. People are struggling with their wellness goals, and we want to use technology to provide the support necessary for wellness and disease prevention,” says Philip Hagen, M.D., M.P.H., medical director for Mayo Clinic Healthy Living online. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Thu, Jul 10 9:00am · View  

Mayo Clinic Announces Online Video Education for Medical Professionals

Online video lectures for medical professionals from Mayo Clinic

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic is now making its video education medical grand rounds lectures and clinical presentations on recent innovations in patient care, education and research accessible to other medical professionals in the new online medical professional video center.

medical professional videoThese lectures contain new practice procedures, treatment options and research covering a wide variety of specialties.For example, a video lecture on Choline C-11 treatment for recurrent prostate cancer describes the benefits to patients as well as the production, imaging and processing facilities necessary to provide the treatment. Another, fecal microbiota transplant, provides step-by-step details of how the procedure is completed so providers and patients can see the process from beginning to end. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Mon, Jun 30 4:39pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the June 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Here are highlights from the June issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.HealthLetter.MayoClinic.com or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: Mayo Clinic Health Letter June 2014 (for journalists only).


Pros and cons of warfarin and newer anti-clotting medicationsIlustración del corazón y medicamentos

For people with atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm problem that increases the risk of stroke, there are more medication treatment choices than ever before, according to the June issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

Doctors often recommend an anti-clotting medication for patients with atrial fibrillation, which can lead to the development of blood clots in the heart. These clots can break off and travel to ― and potentially block ― an artery that supplies blood to the brain. The result is a stroke. More than 15 percent of strokes are attributed to atrial fibrillation.

For decades, the only anti-clotting medication was warfarin (Coumadin). In the last few years, three more options have become available.
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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Wed, Jun 18 3:14pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Study Reverses Current Thought on Treatment of Cirrhosis

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic released a new study reversing current thought on the treatment of cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes. The study found that the continuation of metformin after a cirrhosis diagnosis improved survival rates among diabetes patients. Metformin is usually discontinued once cirrhosis is diagnosed because of concerns about an increased risk of adverse effects associated with this treatment in patients with liver impairment. The Mayo Clinic study was recently published in Hepatology.

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver caused by forms of liver diseases, such as chronic viral hepatitis, chronic alcohol abuse and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This condition is the consequence of damage done to the liver over many years. As cirrhosis progresses, more and more scar tissue forms, impeding proper liver functions. [...]

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Brian Kilen (@briankilen) posted · Tue, May 27 11:21am · View  

Mayo Clinic Health Letter: Highlights from the May 2014 Issue

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Here are highlights from the May issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit http://www.healthletter.mayoclinic.com/ or call toll-free for subscription information, 1-800-333-9037, extension 9771. Full newsletter text: MCHL_May2014 (for journalists only).

Choosing the right time for cataract surgery

Some degree of vision clouding caused by cataracts occurs in most people as they age. But according to the May issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter, there’s no need to rush scheduling the surgery to remove the cataracts. The right time for surgery should be determined by weighing expected improvements in vision against the very slight risk of a less than ideal outcome.

There are several types of age-related cataracts with subtle differences. Except in rare instances, cataracts develop painlessly and gradually, leading to vision changes that include:picture of eyes - normal and with cataracts

  • Increasingly blurred or dim vision
  • Increasing difficulty with night vision
  • Sensitivity to bright light and glare
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Double vision in one eye

In the early stages of the disease, adjustments such as different eyeglasses, brighter lighting and wearing sunglasses to reduce glare may compensate for vision changes. When cataracts interfere with daily tasks, surgery should be considered. [...]

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