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Chloe Piepho (@chloepeipho)

Activity by Chloe Piepho

Chloe Piepho (@chloepeipho) posted · Thu, Aug 7 11:44am · View  

Laparoscopic Surgical Removal of the Gallbladder in Pediatric Patients is Safe

Medical illustration of an infant and its gallbladder highlighted in orangeROCHESTER, Minn. — A recent study conducted by Mayo Clinic researchers recommends laparoscopic cholecystectomies (surgical removal of the gallbladder) for pediatric patients suffering from gallstones and other gallbladder diseases. This study was published in Surgical Laparoscopy Endoscopy & Percutaneous Techniques.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Ishitani are available in the downloads.

A cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure performed to remove the gallbladder, a pear-shaped organ located below the liver on the upper right side of the abdomen. The gallbladder is responsible for collecting and storing bile, which is a fluid secreted by the liver. During a laparoscopic cholecystectomy, four incisions are made in the abdomen. Then, a small video camera and other special tools are used to remove the gallbladder.

Cholelithiasis and other gallbladder diseases requiring cholecystectomies are less common in children compared to adults,” says Michael B. Ishitani, M.D., lead author of the study. “Recently, however, rising rates of obesity in the pediatric population have led
to an increase of gallstones found in children. Therefore, it was important for us to review the current clinical practices to ensure that pediatric patients are being treated properly.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Ishitani are available in the downloads.
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Chloe Piepho (@chloepeipho) posted · Wed, Aug 6 4:29pm · View  

Wellness Coaching: Resiliency Expert Explains How it Improves Overall Quality of Life

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Wellness coaching has become an increasingly prevalent strategy to help individuals improve their health and well-being. Recently, wellness coaching was found to improve quality of life, mood and perceived stress, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Matthew Clark, Ph.D., L.P., lead author of the study and resiliency expert at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, answers some common questions about wellness coaching:

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Clark are available in the downloads.

What is a wellness coach? Wellness coaches are trained and certified by professional organizations to help individuals identify their personal values and desires for change. The coaches provide practical recommendations to help individuals transform their goals into action, in order to sustain the changes over time and improve their quality of life.Wellness coach talking to patient

“Mayo Clinic wellness coaches assist patients, through a strength-based approach, in identifying goals and potential barriers to success, and then create strategies to help them improve on a week-by-week basis,” explains Dr. Clark. “A strength-based approach recognizes that patients bring experience, knowledge and skills which will help them make positive lifestyle changes.”

What are popular areas of improvement? “Wellness coaching focuses on the specific problems someone wants to address, such as weight loss, stress management or goals focusing on work-life balance. We offer wellness coaching to help people have a better life, and improve their overall quality of life, whether it’s socially, emotionally, spiritually, physically or mentally,” says Dr. Clark.

How are these improvements maintained over time? Wellness coaching teaches individuals appropriate goal-setting techniques, strategies for enhancing social and emotional support and other skills to sustain progress over a substantial period of time. [...]

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Chloe Piepho (@chloepeipho) posted · Thu, Jul 31 2:06pm · View  

Algorithm Reduces Use of CT Scans when Diagnosing Children with Appendicitis

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Implementation of an algorithm aimed to diagnose pediatric patients with suspected appendicitis reduces the utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans, without affecting diagnostic accuracy, Mayo Clinic Children's Center researchers have found. The study was recently published in the journal Surgery.

Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain in children. Appendicitis occurs when the appendix becomes inflamed and filled with pus. CT scans are often used to diagnose acute appendicitis because they are accurate, widely available and have the ability to provide clinicians with advanced information in appendicitis cases suspected of complications.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

However, CT scans are expensive and expose patients to ionizing radiation. “This algorithm was developed by a multidisciplinary group of pediatric emergency room physicians, pediatric surgeons and radiologists to eliminate unnecessary exposure to radiation,” explains Michael B. Ishitani, M.D., lead author of the study.

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