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Dana Sparks (@danasparks)

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Fri, Apr 18 4:02pm · View  

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

 

Montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures

April is Donate Life Month, which focuses attention on the importance of registering as organ, eye and tissue donors. Tune in Saturday, April 19, at 9 a.m. CT as we discuss organ donation with Good Samaritan kidney donor Philip Fischer, M.D., and director of the Mayo Clinic kidney transplant program Mikel Prieto, M.D. There is so much to learn about donating the gift of life! Join us!

Myth or Matter of Fact:  I'm not in the best of health, so I probably can't be a donor.

To hear the program LIVE on Saturday, click here.
Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.
Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment April 19, 2014 (right click MP3) 

 

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Wed, Apr 16 5:30pm · View  

WW II Skier Battles Heart Disease (pkg)

'Mayo 150 years serving humanity' 150th Sesquicentennial LogoHe's a veteran of the WW II 10th Mountain Division and survived intense fighting during his tour of duty in that war. But decades later George Nelson faced another battle. This time a serious heart problem took him to Mayo Clinic for a highly specialized operation.   [TRT 3:25]

Journalists: The full package and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. To access the script, click here.   


This is a special report produced for the Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary Collection of Stories. To view other stories and learn about Mayo Clinic's sesquicentennial, please click here.

 

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Tue, Apr 15 1:20pm · View  

TUESDAY Q &A : Children diagnosed with ADHD may continue to have symptoms into adulthood

DEAR MAYO CLINIC:
Our son was diagnosed at the age of 9 with ADHD. He is now 13 and doing well but is still on medication. Will he need to continue taking the medication until adulthood, or do children usually outgrow the condition as they mature?Chalkboard with writing - ADHD

ANSWER:
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), is a chronic, lifelong condition. Throughout their teen years, children with ADHD need to continue taking medication to effectively control the disorder. As adults, about 50 to 60 percent of people diagnosed with ADHD as children continue to have symptoms and may benefit from treatment.

Children with ADHD usually have a combination of problems, such as hyperactivity, impulsive behavior, disorganization and difficulty maintaining attention. Hyperactivity tends to decrease in the teen years and often goes away in adulthood. However, for most people, difficulty with attention and organization persist as they get older. With that in mind, physicians usually recommended that children stay on ADHD medication throughout their teen years.

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Mon, Apr 14 12:40pm · View  

Monday’s Housecall

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THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Skin care: 5 tips for healthy skin
Skin care gimmicks abound — but don't fall for the hype. Learn how to get younger, healthier looking skin.

Organic foods: Are they safer? More nutritious?
Understand the differences between organic food and traditionally grown food when it comes to nutrition, safety and price.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy?
Rarely, hypothyroidism can cause peripheral neuropathy, such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Can you outgrow food allergies?
Learn which food allergies are more likely to fade with age and which tend to persist into adulthood.

Women shopping and fitting shoes on their feetHEALTHY RECIPES
Broiled scallops with sweet lime sauce
Brown rice pilaf
Green beans with red pepper and garlic
Baked apples with cherries and almonds

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Shopping for shoes?
To find shoes that fit properly, try these tips: 1. Have your feet measured. Shoe size can change as you age. 2. Ask the salesperson to measure both feet. If one foot is larger than the other, try on a pair that fits your larger foot. 3. Shop for shoes in the early afternoon after you've been walking for some time, when your feet are at their largest.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Fri, Apr 11 9:42pm · View  

Caring for Skin During and After Radiation

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blogCancer-related fatigue: Create a personal exercise plan
Cancer fatigue can be overwhelming and intense. One of the most effective ways to address it is with exercise.

How to care for skin during and after radiationWoman's hands holding jar of skin care moisturizer cream
Most side effects from radiation therapy are limited to the area being treated and go away within weeks. Use these tips to care for your skin.

Biopsy: Types of biopsy procedures used to diagnose cancer
You might be nervous about an upcoming biopsy. Learning how and why it's done may help reduce your anxiety.

Managing chemotherapy side effects
Chemotherapy treatment carries with it a host of potential side effects — fatigue, hair loss and more. Learn about managing chemotherapy side effects.

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Thu, Apr 10 10:17am · View  

Growing Up Mayo


150th Sesquicentennial LogoThis story originally appeared on the In the Loop blog.

Now and then, you hear about a conversation you wish you could have been in on. Or at least have been eavesdropping on from a nearby table at the coffee shop. That's the feeling you get when reading Rochester historian Harley Flathers' account of his recent conversation with Dr. Charles H. Mayo II, son of Dr. Charles Mayo and grandson of Dr. Charlie Mayo. Flathers writes about the conversation in his Back and Forth column in the Rochester Post-Bulletin. It seems Flathers got Dr. Mayo talking about growing up at Mayowood and as part of the Mayo family.President Roosevelt with Drs. Will and Charlie Mayo

Dr. Mayo, "now 83 and a resident of St. Croix Falls, Wis.," tells Flathers that it was "his choice" not to join Mayo Clinic back in the 1960s. "I'm not a writer," Dr. Mayo says. "I did my residency at Mayo Clinic, but you're required to do a certain amount of papers. Besides, I would constantly have been compared to my father, who was an excellent surgeon, and Grandpa and Will."

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Tue, Apr 8 3:28pm · View  

TUESDAY Q & A: Both too much and too little iron have potential to lead to health concerns

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I'm a 40-year old woman, and I’ve noticed that many multivitamins for women contain iron. Should all women take extra iron? Is it safe to do so? What are the side effects of taking a daily iron supplement?Symbol for chemical element iron

ANSWER: Not having enough iron in your body — a condition known as iron deficiency — is a common problem for women, especially before menopause. But that does not mean all women need an iron supplement. Just as too little iron can cause problems, too much iron in your body can lead to health concerns, as well. To make sure it’s right for you, talk to your doctor before you take an iron supplement.

Iron is a mineral that helps the body make red blood cells. Without enough iron, the body can’t produce the number of red blood cells it needs. This condition, called iron deficiency anemia, is a concern because red blood cells carry oxygen to the body’s tissues. Without enough red blood cells, the body may not be able to get enough oxygen to stay healthy.

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) published a blog post Mon, Apr 7 12:54pm · View  

Monday’s Housecall

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Pet therapy with woman hugging black dog

THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Pet therapy: Man's best friend as healer
Is medicine going to the dogs? Yes, but in a good way. Pet therapy is gaining fans in health care and beyond. Find out what's behind this growing trend.

Seasonal allergies: Nip them in the bud
Relieve seasonal sneezing, congestion, a runny nose and other bothersome symptoms with these tried-and-true tips.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Doppler ultrasound: What is it used for?
A Doppler ultrasound measures blood flow and pressure in blood vessels.

Fructose intolerance: Which foods to avoid?
Learn which foods to stay away from if you have fructose intolerance and what to look for on labels.

HEALTHY RECIPES
Quesadillas
Chicken stir-fry with eggplant and basil
Roasted red pepper with feta salad
Orange slices with citrus syrup

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Want to lose weight? Eat more fiber
High-fiber foods generally take longer to chew. This gives your body time to register when you're no longer hungry, so you're less likely to overeat. And high-fiber foods tend to make you feel full longer, so you won't be as ravenous later. Finally, high-fiber foods tend to have fewer calories for the same volume of food. Choose whole grains and whole-grain products, fruits and vegetables, beans, and peas and other legumes.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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