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Dana Sparks (@danasparks)

Activity by Dana Sparks

Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Mon, Oct 20 10:51am · View  

Monday's Housecall

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THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Tips for dining in or out safely when you have food allergiesfamily eating in restaurant with mother feeding baby
Having a food allergy means taking precautions at mealtime. Learn about safe food handling and preparation when you're at home or away.

Medication errors: Cut your risk with these tips
Medication errors and mistakes injure many people each year. Get tips on how to protect yourself.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Acne scars: What's the best treatment?
Various procedures can improve acne scars, but no single treatment is best for everyone.

Vitamin B-12 injections for weight loss: Do they work?
A weight-loss shot sounds appealing, but there's no solid evidence that vitamin B-12 injections work.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter. [...]

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Fri, Oct 17 2:34pm · View  

Clear Questions and Answers About Ebola

 EBola NIHNational Institutes of Health (NIH)
Risk factors  By Mayo Clinic Staff
For most people, the risk of getting Ebola or Marburg viruses (hemorrhagic fevers) is low. The risk increases if you:

  • Travel to Africa. You're at increased risk if you visit or work in areas where Ebola virus or Marburg virus outbreaks have occurred.
  • Conduct animal research. People are more likely to contract the Ebola or Marburg virus if they conduct animal research with monkeys imported from Africa or the Philippines.
  • Provide medical or personal care. Family members are often infected as they care for sick relatives. Medical personnel also can be infected if they don't use protective gear, such as surgical masks and gloves.
  • Prepare people for burial. The bodies of people who have died of Ebola or Marburg hemorrhagic fever are still contagious. Helping prepare these bodies for burial can increase your risk of developing the disease.

Signs and symptoms typically begin abruptly within five to 10 days of infection with Ebola or Marburg virus. 
Learn more: Ebola virus and Marburg virus
Mayo Clinic was monitoring the evolving Ebola situation well before the first U.S. case was diagnosed on Sept. 30. The institution is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  and state health departments. Mayo Clinic is fully prepared to screen, evaluate and treat patients suspected to have Ebola. That said, at this time, there are no confirmed or suspected cases of Ebola across the institution. While Ebola continues to dominate news coverage, and there is reason for concern, you should not overreact or panic.
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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Fri, Oct 17 6:30am · View  

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

middle-aged man exercising and stretching near ocean

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 18 at 9 a.m. CT, the topic is Men's Health. Two physicians from the new Mayo Clinic Men's Health Program in Arizona will be here to discuss endocrine issues like diabetes and thyroid health. Other topics will include low testosterone and how prostate and sexual health relate to cardiovascular health.  Urologist Jason Jameson, M.D., and cardiologist David Simper, M.D., will join us. Hope you do, too!

Myth or Fact:  Men experience their own type of menopause.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment October 18, 2014 (right click MP3)

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Fri, Oct 17 6:00am · View  

Alternative Medicine for Cancer Patient Fatigue

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Alternative Medicine for Fatiguemiddle-aged couple doing yoga outside on a grassy lawn
Many breast cancer survivors experience fatigue during and after treatment, that can continue for years.

Can bleeding problems during chemotherapy be prevented?
When you have low levels of platelets due to chemotherapy, you bleed and bruise more easily. Here's how to lower your risk of bleeding.

Tips on balancing cancer treatment, desire to work
Work can be a good distraction from thinking about cancer, and it can keep you motivated.

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Wed, Oct 15 4:22pm · View  

Treating POTS: A Teenage Syndrome Solution

'Mayo 150 years serving humanity' 150th Sesquicentennial LogoMaybe you’ve heard the complaints: I’m too tired to get up, my stomach hurts, I just want to sleep. These symptoms might be typical of some teenagers, but for others they're signs of a very real illness called postural tachycardia syndrome or POTS. Today, social media has helped spread awareness of the syndrome, but historical documents suggest Dr. William Worrall Mayo, founder of Mayo Clinic, may have treated young people with it more than a century ago. [TRT 4:43]

Journalists: The video package and extra b-roll are available in the downloads. To read the full script click here.

This is a special report produced for the Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary Collection of Stories. To view other stories and learn about Mayo Clinic's sesquicentennial, please click here

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Wed, Oct 15 4:19pm · View  

Mayo Clinic News Network — Headlines 10/15/14


Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines include:

  • Epilepsy surgery
  • Tomosynthesis for breast cancer screening
  • Sports injury

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script.

 

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Tue, Oct 14 1:10pm · View  

Monitoring Enterovirus D68

Photo: Mayo Clinic monitoring enterovirus D68

Written by Greg Brown, Mayo Clinic News Specialist

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), enterovirus infections are common in the summer and fall. However, hospitals throughout the U.S. are seeing more children than usual with severe respiratory illness caused by enterovirus D68. The CDC is watching the situation and helping with testing of specimens. Health care providers should consider enterovirus D68 in young children with severe respiratory illness or unexplained muscle weakness, and report unusual increases in cases to their state health department.

There is no vaccine or medicine that treats enterovirus infection specifically; but, children can be treated with supportive care, including oxygen, breathing treatments and fluids, as needed.

Clinicians at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Center have been treating a surge of children with acute respiratory illness, involving wheezing and difficulty breathing, since mid-August. One case was confirmed to be due to enterovirus D68, and several other cases are suspected to be due to that virus. Adults also can be infected with enterovirus D68, although the current outbreak of disease appears to affect children primarily. The reason for this is not known. Enterovirus D68 is particularly hard on those with asthma and reactive airway disease.

If you or your children have asthma and or reactive airway disease, the CDC recommends that you:

  • Discuss and update your asthma action plan with your primary care provider.
  • Take your prescribed asthma medications as directed, especially long-term control medication(s).
  • Keep your reliever medication with you.
  • Get a flu vaccine, when available.
  • If you develop new or worsening asthma symptoms, follow the steps of your asthma action plan. If your symptoms do not go away, call your primary care provider right away.

Proactively manage your child’s health by taking these steps: [...]

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