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Sun, Jan 24 at 8:00am EST by ddouda · View  

Winter Hazard: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

map of United States with graphic about carbon monoxide in homesWhen winter storms hit and the thermometer drops, homes are buttoned up tight as people try to stay warm. Unfortunately, it's also a time when cases of carbon monoxide poisoning rise. The invisible, odorless gas claims about 500 lives each year. Symptoms may include headache, dizziness, vomiting, chest pain and confusion.

If you or someone you're with develops signs or symptoms, leave the area and get fresh air immediately. Call 911 for emergency help. Depending on the degree and length of exposure, victims may suffer debilitating injuries, so prompt medical attention can make a big difference in the recovery.                                                             carbon monoxide poisoning graphic

What You Need to Know

"It's very important treatment be tailored to the individual because, even though there are common effects of carbon monoxide poisoning, nobody’s injury or impairment is exactly the same," says Mayo Clinic's Dr. Allen Brown, an expert in physical medicine and rehabilitation after brain injuries.

The fumes of any fossil fuel not properly vented can cause problems. Natural gas, oil, wood, charcoal and engine exhausts are common sources in carbon monoxide poisoning. That’s why, in addition to homes, carbon monoxide detectors are often recommended in campers, cabins and ice fishing houses.

Watch this story of a young motocross rider named Wyatt, who was one of the lucky ones after a very close call with carbon monoxide poisoning in the summer months.

Journalists: Broadcast-quality sound bites are available in the downloads.

 

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Fri, Jan 15 at 7:30am EST by ddouda · View  

Bell Signals the Finish Line of Radiation Therapy for Race Car Driver

Tommy Archer ringing the bell to mark the end of radiation treatments

Professional race car driver Tommy Archer just completed the final lap after seven weeks of radiation therapy for additional treatment of his prostate cancer. "The reality of being able to ring that bell after 33 treatments is humbling," Mr. Archer said. "I didn't think I had the patience," he added. "But, it's what I had to do to stay healthy." Thanks to a Choline C-11 PET scan, a technology developed at Mayo Clinic, Tommy was allowed to return to the race track this past summer after a three-year absence. The treatment approach allowed his urologists to find and remove a hidden tumor that was keeping him out of competition. The same technology can also be used to provide early detection in case a patient's cancer comes back, which is exactly how it worked for Tommy. "The feeling I have now is relief and I hope to be cancer-free."

Now that he's completed treatment, Archer Brothers Racing says Tommy's preparing for a full racing season in 2016. In fact, he hits the road in a few days for a big race in Florida next week.

Watch the original story of how a team of physicians and a bold strategy put Tommy Archer back in the race.

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ddouda

Thu, Jan 7 at 8:00am EST by ddouda · View  

Wyatt's Long Ride Back from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Motocross rider Wyatt Krampitz with his motorcycle. Winter is the time of year when cases of carbon monoxide poisoning rise, especially in colder climates. Homes are buttoned up tight as people try to stay warm. But, the invisible, odorless gas can strike in any season or any region and claims about 500 lives each year. Many more victims may suffer permanent injuries. A young motocross rider named Wyatt was one of the lucky ones. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Watch Wyatt's story here

Journalists: A broadcast-quality video package is available in the downloads, with and without narration. Read the script

 

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ddouda

Dec 25, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Mayo Clinic Minute: Precious Cargo on Mayo One

close up of Mayo One air transport helicopter in airWatch today's Mayo Clinic Minute

  • In an emergency, getting people to the hospital quickly is essential. But, experts at Mayo Clinic say the care patients get along the way is just as important. That was certainly the case for a Minnesota mother, whose life was saved because the medical helicopter that came to get her was stocked with something most air ambulances do not carry. Here’s Dennis Douda with today's Mayo Clinic Minute.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT 1:04] Click here for the script.

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Dec 18, 2015 by ddouda · View  

UV Robots Zapping Hospital Germs

UV disinfection robot device in hospital room

A new government report this month says the rate of hospital-acquired infections has dropped 17% since 2010. Unfortunately, the rate held steady last year, and it’s estimated that 1 in 10 patients will still contract an infection while hospitalized in the United States. Mayo Clinic has been testing a high-tech solution. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network. [TRT 2:40]

Journalists: The broadcast quality package is available in the downloads. Click here to read the script. 

 

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Dec 8, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Melanoma Researcher says Odds Continually Improving for Patients

illustration of cancer cells multiplying

The nation is buzzing this week over what sounds like miraculous news for former President Jimmy Carter. The 91-year-old Carter announced he is cancer-free, just months after revealing he was battling malignant melanoma, which had spread. In August, he had a cancerous mass removed from his liver. Four lesions were then found on his brain and were treated with radiation. Additionally, Mr. Carter was given a relatively new immunotherapy drug, called pembrolizumab.

"Fundamentally, in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, it's a three-pronged attack," says Mayo Clinic Cancer Center oncologist and hematologist, Svetomir Markovic, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Markovic says combinations of immunologic treatments that use the body's own disease-fighting abilities, targeted therapies that focus on the genetic makeup of specific tumors and conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy have given patients much more reason to be hopeful. "One is hard-pressed to find another example, in all of medicine, where there has been such a tremendous revolution in the success of therapy, as [there] has been in melanoma."

Journalists: Broadcast-quality sound bites with Dr. Markovic are available in the downloads.  

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ddouda

Dec 2, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Emergency Blood on Mayo One Flight Saves Mother's Life

aerial image of Mayo One helicopter in flight over Saint Marys Hospital

In an emergency, getting people to the hospital quickly is essential. But, experts at Mayo Clinic say the care patients get along the way is just as important. That was certainly the case for a Minnesota mother, whose life was saved because the Mayo One medical helicopter that came to get her was stocked with something most air ambulances don't carry, packed red blood cells and plasma. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: The broadcast-quality video package, with and without narration, is available in the downloads. Click here to read the script.

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Nov 24, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Preventing Hockey Injuries

hockey player falling on the ice
From peewees to the pros, and every level in between, hockey season is in full swing. Although hockey's often considered a risky sport for injuries, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine experts say smart precautions and top-notch training can lower the odds of getting hurt — while also greatly improving a player’s skills. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: The broadcast quality package is available in the downloads. Click here to read the script. 

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Oct 30, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Baby Kieran's Special Heart

Brian and Caitlin Veitz with daughter Kieran

Congenital heart problems are the most common structural birth defect. They affect about 1 in 100 children. However, the condition a little North Dakota girl came into the world with is incredibly uncommon. She was born with her heart outside of her chest. Sadly, it’s also uncommon for most children to survive it — unless, the stars align perfectly. In this case, they did and those stars were wearing hospital-blue surgical gowns. For the Mayo Clinic News Network, Dennis Douda has the story of baby Kieran's special heart.

Journalists: Broadcast quality videos of the package are available in the downloads, with narration and with natural sound only. The script explaining Kieran's diagnosis and treatment is also available.

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Oct 28, 2015 by ddouda · View  

World Stroke Day: Be Aware of Risks & Symptoms

Bob in the hospital after stroke with his wife Ruth

Watch Bob and Ruth's Story

World Stroke Day is October 29th. Strokes will take the lives of more than six million people around the globe this year. But, Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon Giuseppe Lanzino, M.D., says quick action can make all the difference, often sparing victims from death or a lifetime of impairment. Dennis Douda, with the Mayo Clinic News Network, has a perfect example. [TRT 2:09]

Journalists: Broadcast quality videos of the package are available in the downloads, with narration and with natural sound only. The script explaining Bob & Ruth's experience is also available.

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Oct 20, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Revised

woman having a mammogram, checking for breast cancer

The American Cancer Society (ACS) has updated its recommendations for breast cancer screening for women at average risk of the disease. The recommendations strongly support the value of mammograms and provide some further direction for women at both ends of the age spectrum.

Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., a Breast Clinic physician and Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researcher says,"This is an important paper and we are pleased that ACS has paid attention to and respected patient preferences and values in its recommendation. While the ACS now recommends annual screening mammograms for women who have no risk factors at age 45, it did recommend that women age 40 and up still receive an annual screening mammograms if they choose to seek screening. This shared-decision making approach between a patient and her provider is something we support at Mayo Clinic. Overall, the new ACS recommendations reaffirm that screening mammography for women in their 40s is associated with a decrease in breast cancer deaths."

Breast Cancer is the most common cancer among women and the second deadliest cancer for women, surpassed only by lung cancer. More than 230,000 women in the United States are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year.

The new guidelines were just released in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association). Among the key updates by age:

  • 40-44 Should have opportunity for annual mammograms
  • 45+     Strongly recommend regular mammogram screening
  • 45-54  Annual mammogram screening
  • 55+     Mammograms every two years/annual opportunity
  • 70+     Mammograms for those in good health

Dr. Pruthi says, “So, we have been recommending for years that women in their forties be screened annually with mammogram. So, it’s nice to have the American Cancer Society support what we’ve been telling patients at Mayo Clinic.”

Dr. Pruthi does say she was surprised, however, that the ACS no longer recommends clinical breast exams by physicians for women of average risk. "One surprising part of the recommendation was that ACS no longer supports annual clinical breast exams. We know that mammograms can miss detecting a breast cancer due to the presence of very dense breast tissue. Clinical breast exams conducted by providers can improve the opportunity to detect breast cancers or abnormalities early.  Women are encouraged to be aware of breast changes and bring this to the attention of their providers promptly for evaluation."

Journalists: Broadcast quality sound bites are available in the downloads. Mammogram b-roll is also available. Click here for a transcript of Dr. Pruthi's comments, .

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ddouda

Sep 21, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine Welcomes New NIH Initiative

Journalists: Broadcast quality sound bites with Dr. Stewart are available in the downloads. Click here for the transcript.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced a new framework this week for beginning to collect and decode the genetic information of a huge sampling of volunteers over the next three years in an effort to improve health care at an individualized level. Called the Precision Medicine Cohort Initiative, it's part of the President's Initiative on Precision Medicine announced earlier this year.

The director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., welcomes the announcement. "This is a project to take the DNA of one million Americans, across all walks of life and diversity of populations, and to sequence the genome of each of those individuals and then follow them over time to understand what the genome could tell us and what it could predict about our future health," says Dr. Stewart. "It’s a highly important project."

NIH says $130 million of the $215 million budgeted in fiscal year 2016 for the President's Personalized Medicine Initiative is allocated for development of the participant cohort, meaning the group of patients who will be involved in the research. To read the full NIH news release on the program, click here.

As he prepares to host Mayo Clinic's 4th International Individualized Medicine Conference beginning September 20th, Dr. Stewart says, "Here at Mayo Clinic, we’ve long recognized that this is going to transform medicine and we’re very pleased to see this project moving forward and to be, potentially, a part of that going into the future.”

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ddouda

Sep 10, 2015 by ddouda · View  

3D Printing of Patients' Anatomy Aids in Surgical Planning

Not all great advances in surgery happen in the operating room. Some are coming off the printer – a 3D printer. At Mayo Clinic, radiologists and surgeons are teaming up to discover every possible detail about complex cases before the operation. In some situations, it means patients experience less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. To read the full script, click here

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Sep 4, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Researchers Work on One Flu Shot to Cover All Strains

person getting flu shot in armTwo groups of American researchers recently announced progress in their efforts to create a single flu vaccine. The goal is to find a universal vaccine that will offer broader coverage against all types of influenza each season. It's possible such a vaccine would even provide long-term protection, preparing our immune systems to fight off the flu for many seasons.

The challenge in developing such a vaccine has been the flu virus's ability to mutate quickly. Even slight changes to a virus may interfere with our body's ability to control it before it makes us sick. This newly reported single vaccine research focuses on a protein called hemagglutinin, which all influenza virus strains share in common.

Journalists: Broadcast quality sound bites with Dr. Tosh are available in the downloads. To read a transcript of his quotes, click here.

Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Pritish Tosh, M.D. says,"There’s a lot of research going on looking at some of these other options, in terms of our target for the influenza vaccine." Dr. Tosh, who is also a member of the Vaccine Research Group at Mayo Clinic, says the new avenues of investigation are definitely needed. However, he cautions, the single flu vaccine has only been tested in animals and is not yet available. So, he urges everyone to get immunized with the safe and proven vaccines that we already have. "Influenza is a real killer. It kills tens of thousands of Americans each year, either directly or through its complications. And we really only have one great way in terms of prevention and that is with [the current] influenza vaccine." Play the video to hear more of Dr. Tosh's comments about different research approaches for improving flu vaccines.

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ddouda

Sep 2, 2015 by ddouda · View  

From Marine to Miracle Cancer Survivor

marine Josh Russell in uniform, eating breakfast
Integrated care. A multidisciplinary approach. These are words often heard when talking about the way Mayo Clinic seamlessly incorporates many medical specialties to diagnose and treat patients. A young man from Wisconsin offers up a couple more – lifesaving teamwork. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. To read the full script, click here.

 

 

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ddouda

Aug 18, 2015 by ddouda · View  

New Balloon Therapy Lifts Weight Loss Burden

In the United States, two-thirds of the population is said to be either overweight or obese. Now there’s a new option for those who might need medical help to lose weight but don’t qualify for weight loss surgery.

This week Mayo Clinic gastroenterologists were the first in the U.S. to implant a new device recently approved by the FDA. The procedure involves the temporary placement of a special balloon in the stomach and has the potential for lasting results. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Click here to watch a video with Dr. Andres Acosta Cardenas explain the procedure in Spanish.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. Click here to read the full script.  Sound bites with Dr. Acosta areac also available.

Mayo Clinic has a financial interest in Apollo Endosurgery, manufacturer of the ORBERA managed weight loss system. Revenue Mayo Clinic receives is used to support its not-for-profit mission in patient care, education and research.

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ddouda

Aug 14, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Outracing Cancer: Medical Innovations Get Tommy Archer Back on Track

 

The Trans Am Muscle Car Challenge promises to be a high-octane event Friday in Lexington, Ohio. But, one of the drivers is already a winner. With help from his extensive Mayo Clinic health care team, Tommy Archer outraced prostate cancer in order to get back on the track. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. Click here to read the full script.

Learn more about Archer Brothers Racing and upcoming events.

 

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ddouda

Jul 16, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Mayo Expert: Artificial Liver Ready for Human Testing

On any given day about 15,000 Americans are on the liver transplant waiting list, hoping they can get a lifesaving donor organ in time. It’s that kind of statistic that’s had doctors looking for alternatives for decades. Now, a new study in the Journal of Hepatology reports that Mayo Clinic researchers may have a bioartificial liver ready to do the job for some of those patients. Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Journalists: A broadcast quality video package is available in the downloads. To read the full script click here. To read the news release or to request an interview, click here.

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Jun 19, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Father's Day Gift Tourniquet Comes in Handy!

With FMayo Clinic nurse Maria Flor and her father Randy Therkilsen with the tourniquet that came in handy. ather’s Day coming up, everyone wants to give Dad something he can really use. So, how about a gift that might even save his life? That was the idea behind a Mayo Clinic nurse’s gift; a tourniquet, of all things! Here’s Dennis Douda for the Mayo Clinic News Network.   [TRT 2:29]

Journalists, a broadcast quality package and a how-to video demonstrating proper tourniquet use are available in the downloads.

  • To read the Father's Day Tourniquet script, click here.
  • To read a transcript of Dr. Jenkins' comments, click here.
  • To see Dr. Jenkins demonstrate how to use a tourniquet properly in an emergency, click here.

 

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Jun 10, 2015 by ddouda · View  

Mayo Expert Says New Cholesterol Drugs are Very Effective

The FDA may approve the new medications for use later this year.

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel has recommended approval of the first drug in a new class of cholesterol-lowering medications, called PCSK9 inhibitors. PCSK9 is a protein that interferes with the liver's ability to reduce levels of LDL, often called the bad cholesterol.high cholesterol word cloud image A similar drug made by another company will be considered by the panel today. "The thing that’s different about [these medications] is that they actually enhance your own body’s ability to clear cholesterol," says Stephen Kopecky, M.D., with Mayo Clinic's division of cardiovascular diseases and the immediate past president of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC).

Mayo Clinic participated in some of the research to evaluate the medications. “Of the three that are coming along, we’ve studied two of them here, giving them to patients in research studies and looked at their benefits and side effects; their good effects and bad effects. We’ve found them to be very, very effective,” Dr. Kopecky says.

Play the video to hear more of Dr. Kopecky's comments about how the drugs work and why they could be lifesavers for some patients with high cholesterol.

Journalists, broadcast quality sound bites from Dr. Kopecky are available in the downloads. To read a transcript of his comments about which patients may benefit most and why working to lower cholesterol levels with lifestyle changes benefits more than just heart health, click here.

Full disclosure: Dr. Kopecky is an adviser to the pharmaceutical company Merck, which is not one of the companies awaiting FDA approval for a PCSK9 inhibitor medication.

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