duska

@duska

Activity by duska

duska

Mon, Jan 18 at 11:12am EST by duska · View  

Blackouts in the Brain: A New Complex Systems Perspective on Alzheimer’s Disease

Illustration of brain with light synapses

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Alzheimer’s disease relentlessly targets large-scale brain networks that support the formation of new memories. However, it remains a mystery as to why the disease selectively targets memory-related brain networks and how this relates to misfolded proteins seen by pathologists at autopsy. In an effort to bridge the divide between the targeted memory systems and the misfolded proteins and dying cells underneath, Mayo Clinic researchers have turned to the field of complex systems — an emerging field of science that studies how parts of systems give rise to collective behaviors and how the system interacts with its environment.

In a study of 128 participants in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, which is published in the February issue of the journal Brain, the team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic neurologist David Jones, M.D., proposed a disease model as a pathologic interaction within a complex system composed of large-scale brain networks and small-scale molecules.  They looked into the activity of the default mode network or DMN (a brain system known for being active when we perform tasks involving memory or when invoking mental constructs), and related this activity to measures of Alzheimer’s proteins. Building on their previous work on DMN activity, the team found that a failure that starts in this system cascades through the brain via increases in activity. These increases in activity traditionally have been understood as a compensatory process; however, this new study suggests that they also may be propagating the disease process throughout brain systems — just like rerouting of power surges can cause blackouts in a power grid.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

“We found that this load-shifting process itself may be a major culprit for the development of the Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Jones, the study’s lead investigator and author. “It is not unlike a cascading failure of a power grid. When a hub goes down, other areas of the network are forced to compensate. If the burden shift is too high, it blows off the circuits, and the power is down. This type of failure in our large brain networks may be responsible for the development of the Alzheimer’s disease.”

JOURNALISTS: Audio and video of Dr. Jones are available in the downloads below.
These findings, Dr. Jones believes, support a system model that would open up new avenues of preventive therapeutic interventions targeting large-scale brain activity in the years or even decades before symptoms. “This would be akin to cardiologists encouraging the lowering of blood pressure decades before plaques ever develop in the arteries in the heart,” Dr. Jones says.

Co-authors include David S. Knopman, M.D.; Jeffrey L. Gunter, Ph.D.; Jonathan Graff-Radford, M.D.Prashanthi Vemuri, Ph.D.; Bradley Boeve , M.D.; Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D.; Clifford R. Jack, Jr., M.D. of Mayo Clinic and Michael Weiner, M.D. of University of California, San Francisco.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
duska

Oct 9, 2015 by duska · View  

Mayo Clinic to host the BRAIN Initiative symposium

computer monitor of brain image of patient with epilepsy

Rochester, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will host the Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) symposium Oct. 9-10, 2015. The symposium aims to further the collaborative approach to initiate and accelerate discovery in brain science. Government, industry and academic leaders and researchers from across the globe will convene in Rochester to further their work in neuroscience research and therapies. Walter Koroshetz, M.D., the director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, will be the keynote speaker.BRAIN Symposium Logo

“By bringing together stakeholders from across the range of groups involved in the BRAIN Initiative, we hope to highlight the dual promises of the BRAIN Initiative: to drive public/private collaboration toward developing revolutionary tools to aid the basic understanding of the brain and to quickly translate these discoveries into therapies,” says Kendall Lee, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic neurosurgeon, who leads the Mayo Clinic Neural Engineering Laboratory, a team of more than 30 neurosurgeons, neurobiologists, engineers, imaging scientists and support staff. This team and the collaborators from the University of Texas in El Paso and Hanyang University in Korea won the BRAIN Initiative award to develop deep brain stimulation technology to detect the release of neurotransmitters in the living brain and modulate brain activity.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Oct 6, 2015 by duska · View  

Mayo receives federal grant to develop smart devices to predict, stop seizures

neurology researcher studying monitors with epilepsy patients

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic were awarded a $6.8 million, five-year federal grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop intelligent devices to track and treat abnormal brain activity in people with epilepsy. The grant, part of a presidential initiative aimed at revolutionizing the understanding of the human brain, is called Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies or the BRAIN Initiative.

Epilepsy affects 60 million people worldwide and 3 million in the U.S. Approximately one-third of people with epilepsy will continue having seizures, despite taking daily medications. Seizures, the hallmark of epilepsy, are sudden events that strike patients without warning. The goal of the research is to develop an implantable device that can record brain activity continuously to forecast upcoming seizures and stimulate multiple brain regions in real time to prevent seizures before they ever occur.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Worrell are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Sep 29, 2015 by duska · View  

Autoimmune cerebellar ataxia: Study finds treatment promises for a disease previously considered hopeless

ROCHESTER, Minn. — While autoimmune cerebellar ataxia (a loss of muscle control coordination) can lead to severe disability with some patients becoming wheelchair-bound, there are factors that may help predict better immunotherapy response, according to the Mayo Clinic study published by JAMA Neurology.

Autoimmune cerebellar ataxia in adults, which usually comes on rapidly and progresses quickly, can be divided into disorders that are paraneoplastic (triggered by cancer in the body) or nonparaneoplastic (autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system unrelated to cancer). The disabling neurological effects, which can include speech, eye movement and balance, can cause unsteady walk and difficulties when swallowing. Little has been published regarding treatment responses and neurologic outcomes among patients with autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. However, at least 17 autoantibodies have been reported as causally linked to autoimmune cerebellar ataxia.

“Historically, we found cerebellar ataxia to be a hopeless disease,” says Andrew McKeon, M.B., B.Ch., M.D., a neurologist on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus and lead author of the study. “Although usually severe, treatment responses can be gratifying, particularly in patients with nonparaneoplastic disorders.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. McKeon are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Aug 5, 2015 by duska · View  

Mayo Clinic Transform 2015 to feature people powering health

Group of attendees at Transform conferenceROCHESTER, Minn. — Future improvements in the U.S health care system will come from individuals, not large institutions or systems, say the organizers of Mayo Clinic Transform 2015, a three-day conference that will take place Sept. 30–Oct. 2 at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester and showcase individuals who are taking charge of their health, and spark positive changes in the health care system.

People Power Health is the theme of the Transform 2015 conference. “This theme underscores the momentum underway around the world,” says Barbara Spurrier, administrative director of Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation, which is the host of the conference. “We are seeing the center of gravity shift away from traditional hospitals and health care - to the people.”

Now in its eighth year, Transform features a program of innovators in health and health care from throughout the country.

For inquires and media passes, contact Cathryn Kennedy at kennedy.cathryn@mayo.edu or 612-309-3951 or 507-284-5005.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Jun 22, 2015 by duska · View  

Two Cultures, Same Risk For Cognitive Impairment

young Asian woman comforting older woman who is sad

American and Chinese adults with Type 2 diabetes are at similar risk for memory impairment, Mayo Clinic and Shanghai researchers report

Rochester, Minn. – Diabetes is a known risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, age-related conditions that affect memory and thinking skills. However, little is known about how the diabetes-cognitive decline link compares across cultures.

Scientists from Mayo Clinic and Huashan Hospital in Shanghai explored the association between Type 2 diabetes and cognitive impairment to find out if the relationship varies in different populations. Study participants had not been diagnosed with memory-related diseases, such as vascular dementia or Alzheimer's dementia.

For the study, the researchers evaluated data from two large, ongoing, population-based studies: the Shanghai Aging Study (SAS) and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging (MCSA). Both use similar designs and methodologies. For example, both studies recruit participants from a defined population, include an on-site, in-person evaluation, use similar or comparable tests of cognition, and include participants over age 50. The SAS uses neuropsychological tests adapted from Western tests to harmonize with Chinese culture.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Apr 29, 2015 by duska · View  

Mayo Neurologist Terrence Cascino Elected Pres. of American Academy of Neurology

Dr. Terrence Cascino

Dr. Terrence Cascino

Rochester, Minn. – Terrence L. Cascino, M.D., of Mayo Clinic in Rochester was elected the president of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world’s largest professional association of neurologists and neuroscientists with 28,000 members.

Dr. Cascino, AAN’s 34th president, succeeds Timothy A. Pedley, MD, professor of neurology at the Columbia University Medical Center.

“This is an opportunity of a lifetime to serve our 28,000 members of AAN with unparalleled resources to help them provide the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care for the one in six people worldwide who have a brain disease, such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, epilepsy, autism, and Parkinson’s disease” said Dr. Cascino. “I am privileged to follow a long line of distinguished neurologists committed to expanding the reach of the AAN, demonstrating the value of neurologists, enhancing their career satisfaction and most importantly, being indispensable to our members.”

More information about the leadership announcement can be found in the AAN news release here.

Login here to comment.
duska

Mar 18, 2015 by duska · View  

Is it Dementia, or Just Normal Aging? New Tool May Help Triage

ROCHESTER, Minn – Researchers at Mayo Clinic developed a new scoring system to help determine which elderly people may be at a higher risk of developing the memory and thinking problems that can lead to dementia.  The study is published in the March 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“Our goal is to identify people who are at the highest risk for dementia as early as possible” said study author Ronald Petersen, M.D., Ph.D., Chester and Debbie Cadieux Director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Cora Kanow Professor of Alzheimer’s Disease Research and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Petersen are available in the downloads.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Oct 27, 2014 by duska · View  

Multi-Million-Dollar Grants for Research in Dementia Striking Younger People

Projects will help advance research through collaborations and development of novel strategies for frontotemporal dementia

Rochester, Minn. — Mayo Clinic has been awarded two grants for large, five-year projects on frontotemporal dementia (FTD), characterized by degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. While rare, it may strike people in their twenties, even in their teens.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Oct 15, 2014 by duska · View  

New Guideline in Genetic Testing for Certain Types of Muscular Dystrophy

Knowing the specific subtype is important for getting the best possible careshutterstock_196951337

Rochester, Minn. – The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) offer a new guideline on how to determine what genetic tests may best diagnose a person’s subtype of limb-girdle or distal muscular dystrophy. The guideline is published in the October 14, 2014, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the AAN.

Researchers reviewed all of the available studies on the muscular dystrophy, a group of genetic diseases in which muscle fibers are unusually susceptible to damage, as part of the process in developing the new guideline.

Doctors should conduct a thorough evaluation of symptoms, family history, ethnicity, and results of physical exam and certain lab tests to determine what genetic tests may be more appropriate to order.

“The guideline should help physicians arrive at the right diagnosis quicker so patients will not need to take unnecessary test”, says Mayo Clinic neurologist Duygu Selcen, M.D., who was part of the multi-center research team led by Julie Bolen, PhD, MPH, from the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “This is particularly important because the muscle diseases are often hard to diagnose”, adds Dr. Selcen.

Media Contacts:
Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Rachel Seroka, AAN, rseroka@aan.com, (612) 928-6129 [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Aug 21, 2014 by duska · View  

Mayo Clinic Convenes Thought Leaders to Discuss Transforming Health Care Delivery

CFI Transform logo with many colors
ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation (CFI) will hold Transform 2014, its seventh collaborative symposium focused on redesigning the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 7–9 in Rochester. The symposium draws attendees from around the world looking to connect with colleagues inside and outside the health care industry.

Dozens of thought leaders from a wide array of backgrounds will share ideas and lessons on how to fast-track transformation amidst a rapidly changing environment. Topics include new models of care delivery that have a potential to disrupt the current health care system, the future of virtual health, the shift of the financial burden to the consumers and how to scale programs to large populations.

“We are delighted to welcome back some of the most creative and motivated people in the country to help us transform the way people experience health,” says Douglas Wood, M.D., Medical Director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation and the Transform symposium. “I hope that Transform 2014 will arrive to practical solutions to the challenges that health care is facing today, and will reframe the health care conversation with a positive vision. I look forward to the exchange of the ideas.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalist and commentator John Hockenberry will moderate the symposium discussions that include the following speakers: [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Jul 16, 2014 by duska · View  

Why Some With Alzheimer’s Die Without Cognitive Impairment, While Others Do?

A Third Protein Provides Clue

Since the time of Dr. Alois Alzheimer himself, two proteins (beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau) have become tantamount to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). But a Mayo Clinic study challenges the perception that these are the only important proteins accounting for the clinical features of the devastating disease.

In a large clinico-imaging pathological study, Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrated that a third protein (TDP-43) plays a major role in AD pathology. In fact, people whose brain was TDP positive were 10 times more likely to be cognitively impaired at death compared to those who didn’t have the protein, showing that TDP-43 has the potential to overpower what has been termed resilient brain aging. The study was published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Duska Anastasijevic, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Jul 1, 2014 by duska · View  

July 4th Marks 75th Anniversary of Lou Gehrig’s Farewell Speech

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Seventy-five years ago, on July 4th 1939, baseball legend Lou Gehrig delivered the famous speech bidding farewell to the ballpark and his fans. Two weeks before Gehrig had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Accompanied by his wife, Eleanor, Lou left Mayo Clinic with the devastating diagnosis on June 20th 1939, a day after his 36th birthday. He died in June two years later, not quite 38 years old, of the rare neurological disease that would come to bear his name.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Journalists, the video package and addition b-roll are available in the downloads. To read the video script click here.

ALS is a type of progressive motor neuron disease that typically strikes at middle to later life and causes nerve cells in spinal cord, brain stem and brain to gradually break down and die. These nerve cells are responsible for muscle function so eventually, ALS can affect [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Jun 2, 2014 by duska · View  

Mayo Clinic, University of Pennsylvania Launch International Challenge to Detect Seizures and Treat Epilepsy

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers from Mayo Clinic and the University of Pennsylvania announce the launch of the Seizure Detection Challenge, an international competition inviting the best minds in “machine learning” to improve devices to track and treat epilepsy. Researchers from Penn and Mayo Clinic have designed the challenge, which is hosted by Kaggle.com, an online community where data scientists come together to solve complex problems.

The unique data sets gathered during the challenge will be made freely available to researchers worldwide by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), University of Pennsylvania and Mayo Clinic at the International Epilepsy Electrophysiology Portal to advance epilepsy research and treatment.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Apr 23, 2014 by duska · View  

People with Mild Cognitive Impairment May Die at Higher Rate Than People Without Condition

human mind concept with leaves blowing away from treeROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic research studying the relationship between death and the two types of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) suggests that people who have these conditions die at a higher rate than people without MCI. The research was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 66th Annual Meeting  in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014.

For the study, 862 people with thinking problems and 1,292 with no thinking problems between the ages of 70 and 89 were followed for nearly six years. Over the course of the study, 331 of the group with MCI and 224 of the group without MCI died. Those who had either type of MCI had an 80 percent higher death rate during the study than those without MCI.  People with MCI with no memory loss had more than twice the death rate during the study than those without MCI, while people with MCI with memory loss had a 68 percent higher death rate during the study than those without MCI.
[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
duska

Oct 28, 2013 by duska · View  

November Is Palliative Care Awareness Month: Mayo Clinic Experts Debunk Common Palliative Care Myths

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Palliative care, a specialized, multidisciplinary team approach to caring for seriously ill people and their families, is often errantly reduced to end-of-life care. This misconception has led to palliative care involvement being introduced late in an illness, often depriving patients and their families of comprehensive symptom control, support and assistance with complex decision-making throughout the course of their illness when it could provide the most benefit.

 

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Click here to retrieve video and photography from the Mayo Clinic News Network.

 

Palliative care is ideally integrated earlier in the course of an illness as part of a comprehensive care plan, alongside disease-directed care. There is even convincing evidence that integrating palliative care earlier in the disease course improves quality of life, helps to minimize unwanted and unhelpful interventions, and may even help patients live a little bit longer. Palliative care is available to help clinicians care for patients and their families at any age and any stage of a serious illness. Studies show that the involvement of palliative care leads to more effective, efficient and less costly care, but not less care.

In a recent article published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic physicians Jacob Strand, M.D., and Elise Carey, M.D., along with Mihir Kamdar, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital, shared 10 Things Palliative Care Clinicians Wished Everyone Knew About Palliative Care. These include:

    • Palliative care is appropriate at any stage of serious illness. In fact, evidence supports that the earlier palliative care is incorporated into the care plan, the higher the quality of life for the patient may be.

 

    • Palliative care can help address the emotional impact of serious illness on patients and their families. Palliative care focuses on a holistic approach to care, including a focus on family and caregiver support.

 

    • Palliative care teams assist in complex communication interactions surrounding a serious illness. Effective communication among patients, families and providers allows for higher patient satisfaction, stronger adherence to medical therapy and, ultimately, better health outcomes.

 

  • Palliative care enhances health care value. Research supports that palliative care involvement helps lower health care costs and reduce hospital readmissions, and pharmacy and laboratory costs, while improving the quality of life and patient and family satisfaction.

 

 

"Palliative care is a subspecialty of medicine in which we care for patients with complex and severe illness," says Dr. Carey. "It is really about taking care of patients and their families throughout the course of their illness, at any stage of the illness, even while they are getting life-prolonging or curative care."

Palliative care specialists focus on treating more than the disease; they focus on the whole person and his or her lived experience. "Persons receiving specialist palliative care are able to live better and longer and achieve their goals while living with their serious illness," says Cory Ingram, M.D., the medical director of Palliative Medicine for Mayo Clinic Health System. "This is done by an expert team approach to symptom assessment and management, supportive counseling, care planning, care coordination and crisis prevention. Not only do the patients live better, their family does too."

The following Mayo Clinic experts are available to comment on palliative care and its potential benefits to patients, families, caregivers and providers:

 

 

 

To schedule an interview with one of these palliative care experts, please call Duska Anastasijevic at 507-284-5005.

 

###

About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, visit MayoClinic.com or MayoClinic.org/news.

Journalists can become a member of the Mayo Clinic News Network for the latest health, science and research news and access to video, audio, text and graphic elements that can be downloaded or embedded.

Login here to comment.
duska

Aug 21, 2013 by duska · View  

Mayo Clinic to Hold Sixth Symposium on Transforming Health Care Delivery

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Aug. 21, 2013 — The Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation will hold Transform 2013, its sixth multidisciplinary symposium focused on transforming the way health care is experienced and delivered, Sept. 8–10 in Rochester. Dozens of speakers from a wide array of backgrounds will look through different lenses to understand a larger picture of health care today. Topics include new models of care delivery, the uncertainty of change in the health care landscape, the intersection of business and health care innovation and how to scale programs to large populations.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video of Dr. Nicholas La Russo and John Hockenberry available on the Mayo Clinic News Network

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
Loading information...