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Joe Dangor (@joedangor)

Activity by Joe Dangor

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Mar 24 12:47pm · View  

Media Expert Alert – Preventive Surgery for Gynecologic Cancers

normal female reproductive organs -illustration of uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervixMayo Clinic oncologist and gynecologic surgeon Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is available to provide context for reporters wishing to better understand preventive surgery for gynecologic cancers.

This is in light of actress Angelina Jolie’s announcement she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed as a cancer prevention strategy.

MEDIA: To interview Dr. Bakkum-Gamez, contact Joe Dangor at 507-284-5005 or e-mail newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez are available in the downloads.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Mar 23 3:55pm · View  

Could a Tampon Help Predict Endometrial Cancer? Mayo Clinic Researchers Say Yes

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical “off” switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check.

The finding is a critical step toward a convenient and effective screening test for endometrial cancer, which is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States. The results are published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology.

“Unfortunately, there is no equivalent to a Pap smear or a mammogram for endometrial cancer,” says Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., a gynecologic oncologist at Mayo Clinic and lead author of the study. “We know that the earlier a woman is diagnosed, the better the likelihood is that she is going to have a positive outcome from cancer treatment. Our goal is to use our findings to develop a tool for the early detection of endometrial cancer that women could use in the comfort of their own homes.”

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Several sound bites with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez are available in the download link.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, Mar 12 2:51pm · View  

Oncologists Reveal Reasons for High Cost of Cancer Drugs, Recommend Solutions

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Increasingly high prices for cancer drugs are affecting patient care in the U.S. and the American health care system overall, say the authors of a special article published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

“Americans with cancer pay 50 percent to 100 percent more for the same patented drug than patients in other countries,” says S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D., of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, who is one of the authors. “As oncologists we have a moral obligation to advocate for affordable cancer drugs for our patients.”

Dr. Rajkumar and his colleague, Hagop Kantarjian, M.D., of MD Anderson Cancer Center, say the average price of cancer drugs for about a year of therapy increased from $5,000 to $10,000 before 2000 to more than $100,000 by 2012. Over nearly the same period the average household income in the U.S. decreased by about 8 percent.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, Feb 26 12:46pm · View  

U.S. Women’s Awareness of Breast Density Varies by Race and Ethnicity, Education and Income, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

Disparities in the level of awareness and knowledge of breast density exist among U.S. women, according to the results of a Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Xray of non dense breast with cancer

Image A: Non-dense breast tissue showin.g a small cancer (upper left)

Breast density is the term used to describe the variation in dense tissue on a mammogram image. Fatty breast tissue appears more radiologically translucent than dense (fibroglandular) breast tissue. Regions of a breast that comprise fatty tissue will appear darker on a mammogram, while regions that comprise dense tissue appear whiter.

Dense breast w cancer

Image B: Dense breast tissue with palpable lump, cancer diagnosed (far right center)

Increased breast density has been shown to mask cancers on the mammogram as well as to be associated with future risk of breast cancer. Recent legislation in several states mandates that women be given information about breast density in order to guide decisions about breast cancer screening.

Researchers conducted a national cross-sectional survey of 2,311 women ages 40 to 74 in English and Spanish. The survey response rate was 65 percent. Overall, more than half of women who responded (58 percent) had heard of breast density, 49 percent were aware that breast density affects breast cancer detection and 53 percent knew that breast density is associated with cancer risk.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Wed, Feb 25 4:16pm · View  

Mayo Clinic’s Measles Virus Therapy for Cancer Profiled in VICE Documentary on HBO

measles virus to fight cancer researches in lab

On Friday, Feb. 27 at 10 p.m. ET/10 p.m. PT, HBO will broadcast a documentary entitled Killing Cancer.

Shane Smith from HBO VICE on measles virus and cancer vaccineVICE founder and host Shane Smith follows pioneering researchers across the U.S. — including specialists from the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center — who are changing the face of modern-day medicine through their work with oncolytic virus therapy.

This revolutionary treatment uses HIV, measles and other viruses that have killed millions to combat cancer. You can view the trailer:

 

 

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Feb 23 1:50pm · View  

Decline in Smoking Rates May Increase Lung Cancer Mortality Due to Inadequate Screening Guidelines

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don’t qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. Their research appears in the Feb. 24 issue of JAMA, the journal of the American Medical Association.

“As smokers quit earlier and stay off cigarettes longer, fewer are eligible for CT screening, which has been proven effective in saving lives,” says Ping Yang, M.D., Ph.D., an epidemiologist at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. “Patients who do eventually develop lung cancer are diagnosed at a later stage when treatment can no longer result in a cure.”

Dr. Yang says researchers and policymakers need to re-examine screening criteria to identify a greater proportion of patients who develop lung cancer.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, Jan 22 12:00pm · View  

New Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model More Accurate Than Current Model

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard. Results of a Mayo Clinic study comparing the new model to the current standard, the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT), are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, Jan 23 10:08am · View  

Mayo Clinic: Women with Atypical Hyperplasia are at Higher Risk of Breast Cancer

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Women with atypical hyperplasia of the breast have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than previously thought, a Mayo Clinic study has found. Results of the study appear in a special report on breast cancer in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Journalists:  Sound bites with Drs. Hartman and Degnim are available in the downloads.

Atypical hyperplasia of the breast is a precancerous condition found in about one-tenth of the over 1 million breast biopsies with benign findings performed annually in the United States. Viewed under a microscope, atypia contains breast cells that are beginning to grow out of control (hyperplasia) and cluster into abnormal patterns (atypical). Atypia lesions are considered benign, but by its risk and appearance and genetic changes, they exhibit some of the early features of cancer.

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