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Joe Dangor (@joedangor)

Activity by Joe Dangor

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Aug 19 2:23pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Investigator to Lead Alliance Research Base for New National, Community-based Cancer Research Initiative

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Jan Buckner, M.D., a five-year, $47.5 million grant to lead the NCI’s National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) research base for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Buckner is deputy director for cancer practice at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, where the Alliance research base will be located.Cancer wordsJan Buckner M.D

NCORP is a national network of cancer investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions and other organizations that provide care to diverse populations in community-based health care practices across the United States. NCORP will design and conduct trials to improve cancer prevention, cancer control, screening and post-treatment management.

The Alliance research base at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Minnesota will be one of seven research bases across the country that will design and conduct multicenter cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research. NCORP hubs will also provide overall administration, data management, scientific leadership and regulatory compliance for the NCORP program.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Aug 12 2:34pm · View  

Mayo Study Finds Less Radical Procedures Offer Similar Cancer Control Compared to Surgery for Kidney Cancer Patients

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Needle-guided tumor destruction procedures offer near equivalent lengths of local cancer control compared to surgery for patients with small kidney cancer tumors, according to the results of a large study published in the journal European Urology. “If validated, these data suggest that an update to clinical guidelines would be warranted,” says the study’s lead author, R. Houston Thompson, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist.

Dr. Thompson says radical nephrectomy – surgical removal of the entire kidney – has historically been the standard of care for management of kidney cancer; however, partial nephrectomy – surgical removal of tumors from a kidney while sparing healthy tissue –has become increasingly more common because of its nephron-sparing benefits and similar cancer control. The nephron is the part of the kidney that filters out toxins from the blood.

“We undertook this study because direct comparisons of outcomes among patients with kidney cancer who have received partial nephrectomy (PN), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) – tumor destruction using intense heat and cryoablation – tumor destruction using extreme cold – are lacking, especially from institutions that routinely perform all three of these procedures,” Dr. Thompson says.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Thompson are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, Jul 18 11:47am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researcher to Lead National Cancer Research Statistics and Data Center

Dr. Daniel SargentROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic announced today that Daniel Sargent, Ph.D., has been awarded a $32.7 million, five-year grant by the National Cancer Institute to lead the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology’s Statistics and Data Center. The Center will be located at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester.

“This award will allow Mayo Clinic to continue and expand our over 35-year history as a national hub for conducting cancer clinical trials,” says Dr. Sargent, a biostatistician. The Alliance Statistics and Data Center is a multi-institutional operation that involves researchers at Mayo Clinic, Duke University, Dana- Farber Cancer Center, Ohio State University, and MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) is a national clinical trials network sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. The Alliance consists of nearly 10,000 cancer specialists at hospitals, medical centers and community clinics across the United States and Canada. The group develops and conducts clinical trials on promising new cancer therapies, develops treatment and prevention strategies and conducts research to alleviate side effects of cancer and cancer treatments. The Alliance enrolls 3,000 to 5,000 patients annually on its studies.
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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, Jul 17 9:30am · View  

Target Field Pitch for Prevention: Raising Awareness of Cancers that Can be Defeated

P4PWHAT: Mayo Clinic, Fight Colorectal Cancer and Ed Randall’s Fans for the Cure will encourage baseball fans to “pitch in” to prevent prostate and colorectal cancer as the Minnesota Twins begin a three-game series against the Cleveland Indians at Target Field in Minneapolis on July 21.

Pitch for Prevention is intended to raise awareness about prostate cancer and colorectal cancer prevention through an educational event for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer survivors with Mayo Clinic physicians, educational booths on Target Plaza and a champion’s march of cancer survivors onto Target Field. The Pitch for Prevention educational event will be streamed live at pitchforprevention.com.

The campaign will include a special appearance by country music star Craig Campbell, who lost his father to colorectal cancer at age 11. Losing his father at a young age inspired Campbell to become involved in the fight against colorectal cancer. He was recently named national spokesperson for Fight Colorectal Cancer.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prostate cancer is the second-leading killer of men in the U.S., and colorectal cancer is the third-leading killer of both men and women in the U.S.

WHERE: Target Field, Minneapolis.

WHEN: Monday, July 21, 2014. Educational event begins at 4 p.m. Game begins at 7:10 p.m.

WHO: Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist Paul Limburg, M.D., founder of Pitch for Prevention, Craig Campbell, country singer and national spokesman for Fight Colorectal Cancer. Eric Powell, colorectal cancer survivor, will throw out the first pitch of the game.

Dr. Limburg and Campbell will be available for interviews on July 21.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Chloe Piepho or Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Wed, Jul 16 4:48pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Earns "Exceptional" Rating, Wins NCI Grant Renewal

National Cancer Institute logoROCHESTER, Minn. – The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center (MCCC) announced today that it has received an overall "exceptional" score on the competitive renewal of its National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Center Support Grant (CCSG). The grant award will provide roughly $28.6 million in funding over five years, providing essential support for the MCCC's 10 research programs and 13 shared resources through 2018.

The MCCC's NCI designation as a comprehensive cancer center was also renewed. To earn the comprehensive cancer center designation, an institution must participate in multidisciplinary laboratory, clinical and population-based research and educate the community it serves about research advances. There are 41 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers across the country. The MCCC is the only single comprehensive cancer center with three geographic sites – in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jacksonville, Fla., and Rochester, Minn.

"Exceptional" is the highest rating given by the NCI. Fewer than 10 percent of NCI-designated cancer centers receive "exceptional" scores.

"This rating reflects the level of science being conducted by our researchers and the high quality of our staff," says MCCC director, Robert Diasio, M.D.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Jul 1 9:58am · View  

Proton therapy has advantages over IMRT for advanced head and neck cancers, Mayo study finds

Rochester, Minn. -- A new study by radiation oncologists at Mayo Clinic comparing the world’s literature on outcomes of proton beam therapy in the treatment of a variety of advanced head and neck cancers of the skull base compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has found that proton beam therapy significantly improved disease free survival and tumor control when compared to IMRT. The results appear in the journal Lancet Oncology.

“We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients treated with proton therapy with patients receiving photon IMRT,” says senior author Robert Foote, M.D., a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic. “Our findings suggest that the theoretical advantages of proton beam therapy may in fact be real.”

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Jun 10 2:32pm · View  

Longer Telomeres, Considered Sign of Good Health, Linked to Brain Cancer Risk

Illustration of a glioma in a young manResearch conducted by Mayo Clinic investigators has found that two common gene variants that lead to longer telomeres — the caps on chromosome ends thought by many scientists to confer health by protecting cells from aging — also significantly increase the risk of developing gliomas, a deadly form of brain cancer.

The genetic variants, in two telomere-related genes known as TERT and TERC, are respectively carried by 51 percent and 72 percent of the general population. Because it is somewhat unusual for such risk-conferring variants to be carried by a majority of people, the researchers propose that, in these carriers, the overall cellular robustness afforded by longer telomeres trumps the increased risk of high-grade gliomas, which are invariably fatal but relatively rare.

The research was published online in the journal Nature Genetics.
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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, May 30 1:15pm · View  

Mayo Clinic: Ovarian Cancer Subtypes May Predict Response to Bevacizumab

Dowdy (2)CHICAGO — Molecular sequencing could identify ovarian cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with bevacizumab (Avastin), a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. Results of the research were presented today at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.

The addition of bevacizumab to standard therapy extended progression-free survival more for ovarian cancer patients with molecular subtypes labeled as “proliferative” or “mesenchymal” compared to those with subtypes labeled as “immunoreactive” or “differentiated,” says Sean Dowdy, M.D., a Mayo Clinic gynecologic oncologist and senior author of the study. “Though our study is very preliminary, it does suggest that we are getting close to the point where we could use sequencing data to choose more effective and less toxic therapies for patients.”

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