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Joe Dangor (@joedangor)

Activity by Joe Dangor

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Jun 8 9:00am · View  

Molecular Classification May Improve Method Used to Diagnose and Treat Gliomas

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The molecular makeup of brain tumors can be used to sort patients with gliomas into five categories, each with different clinical features and outcomes, researchers at Mayo Clinic and the University of California San Francisco have shown. The finding could change the methods that physicians rely on to determine prognosis and treatment options. Previously, they relied on how patients’ tumors look under the microscope. The study is published online in the  New England Journal of Medicine.

“Our findings are going to weigh heavily on the future classification of brain tumors. The time of classifying these tumors solely according to histology as astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma or mixed oligoastrocytoma could be a thing of the past,” says lead study author Daniel H. Lachance, M.D., a neuro oncologist at Mayo Clinic. “This molecular data helps us better classify glioma patients, so we can begin to understand who needs to be treated more aggressively and who might be able to avoid unnecessary therapies.”

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Jun 1 1:37pm · View  

Study may change practice of whole brain radiation therapy for limited brain metastases

Dr. Jan Buckner presents in 5/31/15 ASCO press briefing on treatment advances

Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jan Buckner presents in 5/31/15 ASCO press briefing on cancer treatment advances.

CHICAGO -- A new study presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology suggests that the practice should be reconsidered. More than 650,000 patients a year in the U.S. are diagnosed and treated for cancers that spread to the brain. For about 200,000 of these patients, those with 1-3 small brain metastases, a combination of whole brain radiation therapy and radiosurgery, a highly focused form of radiation therapy, have been the standard of care.

While whole brain radiation therapy improves tumor control it did not improve survival and it was shown to have deleterious effects on patients cognitive abilities. “This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment,?” said Jan Buckner, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic and senior author of the study. “We used to offer whole brain radiation early on, but we now know that the toxicities of this therapy are worse for the patients than the cancer growth or recurrences in the brain. We expect that practice will shift to reserve the use of whole brain radiation therapy for salvage therapy (used when cancer will not respond to other therapies) and in end-stage palliative care.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu 

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Sat, May 30 7:30am · View  

Targeted Drug Can ‘Diminish the Suffering’ of Myelofibrosis

CHICAGO — Use of the targeted agent pacritinib significantly reduced the symptoms and burden of advanced myelofibrosis in patients, says a Mayo Clinic researcher who co-led PERSIST-1, the worldwide phase 3 clinical trial that tested the therapy. Specifically, pacritinib substantially reduced severe enlargement of the spleen, a typical feature of advanced myelofibrosis, in more than 20 percent of patients and alleviated debilitating side effects in more than 46 percent.

Investigators further found that pacritinib could be used safely in patients with myelofibrosis who have thrombocytopenia, a life-threating loss of blood platelets that can lead to deadly bleeding. The only currently approved therapy for myelofibrosis — ruxolitinib — is not recommended in patients who have severe thrombocytopenia.

Ruben A. Mesa, M.D., chair of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will present these results at a press conference held during the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu 

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, May 28 12:00pm · View  

VICE on HBO Documentary “Killing Cancer” and Match from VICE CEO Shane Smith Leads to More than $2 million for Cancer Research at Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic cancer researcher Stephen Russell, M.D. Ph.D.  with VICE CEO host Shane Smith

Mayo Clinic cancer researcher Stephen Russell, M.D. Ph.D. with VICE CEO Shane Smith

ROCHESTER Minn. – Mayo Clinic today announced that fundraising associated with the VICE documentary “Killing Cancer,” which aired on HBO earlier this year, has exceeded $2 million. This achievement was reached a month earlier than anticipated.

The Killing Cancer campaign also set a record at Mayo Clinic with 30 percent of gifts received online, compared to 10 percent for previous campaigns. Many of the gifts came from new supporters to Mayo Clinic a reflection the younger demographics of the VICE audience and VICE’s strong digital presence.

“The money raised in the Killing Cancer campaign will have impact right away, helping advance cancer research and finding cures for patients,” said John Noseworthy, M.D., Mayo Clinic president and CEO.

The success of the campaign was due in large part to a fundraising match challenge issued by VICE founder and CEO Shane Smith with a total goal of $2 million. Through the challenge, Mr. Smith matched the first $1 million in gifts made by more than 10,000 documentary viewers and loyal Mayo Clinic supporters.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, May 14 11:00am · View  

Mayo Urologists Present Findings at 2015 American Urological Association Meeting

AUA annual meeting logo 2015Embargoed Releases. See specific embargo information for each study.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic urologists will present research findings on several topics at the American Urological Association Annual Meeting May 15–19 in New Orleans. Researchers will be available to discuss their research with reporters who are covering the conference. Mayo Clinic studies to be presented include:

Holmium Laser Excision of Genitourinary Mesh Exposure Following Anti-Incontinence Surgery: Minimum Six-Month Follow-up.
Embargoed until Sunday, May 17, 2015 1:00 p.m. CT

The polypropylene mesh implants used in some incontinence surgeries for women can erode tissue and sometimes intrude into the bladder or urethra, often causing pain, bleeding and infection. Conventional treatment requires major open surgery.medical staff person holding chalkboard with the word urology

Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered they can trim mesh with an endoscopic laser and remove it without having to make incisions.

“Removal of mesh with old-fashioned surgery is a big surgery,” says lead author Daniel Elliott, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist. “We were trying to see if there is a way to get this done easier. With certain types of mesh exposures this is very effective and others it’s not. But it presents itself as a potential option for some of these people to avoid a major surgery.” [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, May 11 1:30pm · View  

Expert Alert – May is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Prevention Month Know How to Reduce Your Risk

ROCHESTER, Minn. — May is National Melanoma Skin Cancer Prevention Month and the perfect time to raise awareness about this deadly disease. Mayo Clinic experts in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are available to discuss Melanoma prevention, detection and treatment strategies. Melanoma

Here are some skin cancer prevention tips from Mayo Clinic:

Avoid the sun during the middle of the day. For many people in North America, the sun's rays are strongest between about 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Schedule outdoor activities for other times of the day, even in winter or when the sky is cloudy.

You absorb UV radiation year-round, and clouds offer little protection from damaging rays. Avoiding the sun at its strongest helps you avoid the sunburns and suntans that cause skin damage and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. Sun exposure accumulated over time also may cause skin cancer.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, May 4 9:00am · View  

MEDIA ADVISORY: Mayo Clinic to Host Grand Opening Event for Proton Therapy Facility

Time lapsed video of construction

WHAT: Mayo Clinic is hosting a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. Reporters will have a chance to tour the facility, take photos and video and interview experts.

WHERE: Richard O. Jacobson Building, 190 2nd Street NW, Rochester, Minn. 

WHEN: Saturday, May 9, 2015 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dr. Sameer Keole - Proton Beam

Dr. Sameer Keole

Dr. Robert Foote Chair Radiation Oncology - Proton Beam

Dr. Robert Foote


WHO:

Interviews available with Robert Foote, M.D.,
chair, Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Sameer Keole, M.D., medical director, medical director of Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program.

 

 


RSVP:  Maureen Wegner, wegner.maureen@mayo.edu, 507-293-3677
MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Learn more about Proton Beam Therapy in this video report.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Apr 27 3:30pm · View  

Mayo Clinic-led Team Identifies Master Switch for Cancer-Causing HER2 Protein

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance.

A team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic has found a promising way to circumvent this obstacle. They identified a small site in the HER2 protein that enables it to form a molecular switch that sets off a cascade of events that turn normal cells cancerous. The researchers showed that disrupting this site can stem the growth of breast cancer cells, even more effectively than drugs currently used in the clinic. Their study is published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“This study is the first to look at the specific sequences for dimerization of HER2 as a possible anti-cancer target,” says the study’s senior author Ruth Lupu, Ph.D., a professor of experimental pathology and laboratory medicine and biochemistry and molecular biology at Mayo Clinic. “This finding could be beneficial not only for breast cancer, but also for other cancers with abnormal HER2 levels, such as ovarian, stomach and prostate cancer.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists:  Sound bites with Dr. Lupu are available in the downloads.

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