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Joe Dangor (@joedangor)

Activity by Joe Dangor

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Thu, May 14 11:00am · View  

Mayo Urologists Present Findings at 2015 American Urological Association Meeting

AUA annual meeting logo 2015Embargoed Releases. See specific embargo information for each study.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic urologists will present research findings on several topics at the American Urological Association Annual Meeting May 15–19 in New Orleans. Researchers will be available to discuss their research with reporters who are covering the conference. Mayo Clinic studies to be presented include:

Holmium Laser Excision of Genitourinary Mesh Exposure Following Anti-Incontinence Surgery: Minimum Six-Month Follow-up.
Embargoed until Sunday, May 17, 2015 1:00 p.m. CT

The polypropylene mesh implants used in some incontinence surgeries for women can erode tissue and sometimes intrude into the bladder or urethra, often causing pain, bleeding and infection. Conventional treatment requires major open surgery.medical staff person holding chalkboard with the word urology

Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered they can trim mesh with an endoscopic laser and remove it without having to make incisions.

“Removal of mesh with old-fashioned surgery is a big surgery,” says lead author Daniel Elliott, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist. “We were trying to see if there is a way to get this done easier. With certain types of mesh exposures this is very effective and others it’s not. But it presents itself as a potential option for some of these people to avoid a major surgery.” [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, May 11 1:30pm · View  

Expert Alert – May is Melanoma and Skin Cancer Prevention Month Know How to Reduce Your Risk

ROCHESTER, Minn. — May is National Melanoma Skin Cancer Prevention Month and the perfect time to raise awareness about this deadly disease. Mayo Clinic experts in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota are available to discuss Melanoma prevention, detection and treatment strategies. Melanoma

Here are some skin cancer prevention tips from Mayo Clinic:

Avoid the sun during the middle of the day. For many people in North America, the sun's rays are strongest between about 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Schedule outdoor activities for other times of the day, even in winter or when the sky is cloudy.

You absorb UV radiation year-round, and clouds offer little protection from damaging rays. Avoiding the sun at its strongest helps you avoid the sunburns and suntans that cause skin damage and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. Sun exposure accumulated over time also may cause skin cancer.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, May 4 9:00am · View  

MEDIA ADVISORY: Mayo Clinic to Host Grand Opening Event for Proton Therapy Facility

Time lapsed video of construction

WHAT: Mayo Clinic is hosting a grand opening event for the Richard O. Jacobson Building, home to the Mayo Clinic proton beam therapy program. The new facility will begin treating patients in late June. Reporters will have a chance to tour the facility, take photos and video and interview experts.

WHERE: Richard O. Jacobson Building, 190 2nd Street NW, Rochester, Minn. 

WHEN: Saturday, May 9, 2015 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dr. Sameer Keole - Proton Beam

Dr. Sameer Keole

Dr. Robert Foote Chair Radiation Oncology - Proton Beam

Dr. Robert Foote


WHO:

Interviews available with Robert Foote, M.D.,
chair, Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

Sameer Keole, M.D., medical director, medical director of Mayo Clinic's Proton Beam Therapy Program.

 

 


RSVP:  Maureen Wegner, wegner.maureen@mayo.edu, 507-293-3677
MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Learn more about Proton Beam Therapy in this video report.

[...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Apr 27 3:30pm · View  

Mayo Clinic-led Team Identifies Master Switch for Cancer-Causing HER2 Protein

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance.

A team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic has found a promising way to circumvent this obstacle. They identified a small site in the HER2 protein that enables it to form a molecular switch that sets off a cascade of events that turn normal cells cancerous. The researchers showed that disrupting this site can stem the growth of breast cancer cells, even more effectively than drugs currently used in the clinic. Their study is published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“This study is the first to look at the specific sequences for dimerization of HER2 as a possible anti-cancer target,” says the study’s senior author Ruth Lupu, Ph.D., a professor of experimental pathology and laboratory medicine and biochemistry and molecular biology at Mayo Clinic. “This finding could be beneficial not only for breast cancer, but also for other cancers with abnormal HER2 levels, such as ovarian, stomach and prostate cancer.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists:  Sound bites with Dr. Lupu are available in the downloads.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Sat, Apr 18 11:26am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify Methylated DNA Markers That May One Day Lead To Noninvasive Whole Body Cancer Screening

PHILADELPHIA — A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has succeeded in identifying the source of cancer in patients’ gastrointestinal tracts by analyzing DNA markers from tumors. The results open the possibility that doctors could one day be able to screen for cancer anywhere in the body with a noninvasive blood test or stool sample. Such tests, if they prove practical and feasible, could mean greater convenience for patients and saved lives through earlier diagnosis of cancer, especially rare and often lethal diseases such as pancreatic cancer or lung cancer.

The researchers' findings will be presented on April 21 in a poster presentation at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 in Philadelphia by John Kisiel, M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Kisiel are available in the downloads.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Sat, Apr 18 1:33pm · View  

Metformin Use May Not Improve Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

AACR 2015 Dr. Chaiteerakij

Roongruedee Chaiteerakij, M.D., Ph.D.

PHILADELPHIA -- Use of the diabetes drug Metformin by patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may not improve survival according to the results of a study performed at Mayo Clinic and presented today at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, in Philadelphia by Roongruedee Chaiteerakij, M.D., Ph.D., of Mayo Clinic.

Read
 the press release from the American Association for Cancer Research.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

 

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Apr 7 11:57am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Combine Common Genetic Variants and Other Factors to Improve Breast Cancer Risk Prediction

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Recent large-scale genomic analyses have uncovered dozens of common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer. Each variant, however, contributes only a tiny amount to a person’s overall risk of developing the disease.

A Mayo Clinic-led team of international researchers has now combined 77 of these common genetic variants into a single risk factor that can be used to improve the identification of women with an elevated risk of breast cancer. This factor, known as a polygenic risk score, was built from the genetic data of more than 67,000 women. The results of the research are published April 9, 2015, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI).

A companion study has extended this finding to show that this measure of genetic variation can be combined with traditional predictors of breast cancer risk such as breast density and family history to improve personalized estimates of breast cancer risk. Those findings appeared in JNCI last month.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Fergus Couch are in the downloads.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Mar 24 12:47pm · View  

Media Expert Alert – Preventive Surgery for Gynecologic Cancers

normal female reproductive organs -illustration of uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervixMayo Clinic oncologist and gynecologic surgeon Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, M.D., is available to provide context for reporters wishing to better understand preventive surgery for gynecologic cancers.

This is in light of actress Angelina Jolie’s announcement she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed as a cancer prevention strategy.

MEDIA: To interview Dr. Bakkum-Gamez, contact Joe Dangor at 507-284-5005 or e-mail newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Bakkum-Gamez are available in the downloads.

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