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Joe Dangor (@joedangor)

Activity by Joe Dangor

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Mon, Nov 17 11:37am · View  

Investigational Oral Drug Combo Shows Promise for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in Mayo Clinic-Led Study

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The investigational drug ixazomib taken orally in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone shows promise in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, according to the results of a phase 1/2 study published in the journal Lancet Oncology.

"Ixazomib is an investigational, oral proteasome inhibitor with promising anti-myeloma effects and low rates of peripheral neuropathy," says Shaji Kumar, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic and lead author of the study. "While it is well known that a combination of bortezomib, lenalidomide and dexamethasone is highly effective in treating newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, we wanted to study the safety, tolerability and activity of ixazomib in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma."

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, Nov 14 11:59am · View  

Chemotherapy Following Radiation Treatment Slows Disease Progress and Improves Overall Survival in Adults with Low-Grade Brain Cancer

 

MIAMI — A chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazineCCNU, and vincristine (PCV) administered following radiation therapy improved progression-free survival and overall survival in adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain cancer, when compared to radiation therapy alone. The findings were part of the results of a Phase III clinical trial presented today at the Society for Neuro-Oncology’s 19th Annual Meeting in Miami by the study’s primary author Jan Buckner, M.D., deputy director, practice, at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

“On average, patients who received PCV lived 5.5 years longer than those who received radiation alone,” says Dr. Buckner. “These findings build on results published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2012 and presented at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, which showed that PCV given with radiation therapy at the time of initial diagnosis prolongs progression free-survival but not overall survival.”

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, Oct 24 6:47pm · View  

International Group Publishes Updated Criteria for Diagnosing Multiple Myeloma

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― The International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) today announced that it has updated the criteria for diagnosing multiple myeloma. A paper outlining the new criteria was published in the journal Lancet Oncology. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell.

"Our group, which includes more than 180 myeloma researchers worldwide, has updated the definition of multiple myeloma for diagnostic purposes to include validated biomarkers in addition to the current clinical symptoms used for diagnosis which include, elevated blood calcium levels, kidney failure, anemia and bone lesions," said lead author S. Vincent Rajkumar, M.D. a hematologist at Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Rajkumar said multiple myeloma is always preceded sequentially by two asymptomatic conditions, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM).

However, since MGUS and SMM are both asymptomatic conditions, most myeloma patients are not diagnosed until organ damage occurs. "The new IMWG criteria allow for the diagnosis of myeloma to be made in patients without symptoms and before organ damage occurs, using validated biomarkers that identify patients with SMM who have an “ultra-high” risk of progression to multiple myeloma," Dr. Rajkumar said. "These biomarkers are associated with the near inevitable development of clinical symptoms and are important for early diagnosis and treatment which is very important for patients." [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Oct 7 10:26am · View  

Walmart Introduces Cancer Care Benefit for Associates at Mayo Clinic

The following is a news release issued by Walmart today

Contact: Randy Hargrove: 1-800-331-0085 news.walmart.com/reporter

BENTONVILLE, Ark., Oct. 7, 2014 – Building on its innovative program that has enhanced the quality of health care for its associates, Walmart announced it is expanding its Centers of Excellence program to include three cancers with Mayo Clinic, one of the nation’s leading health care providers.

Effective Jan. 1, 2015, Walmart associates and family members enrolled in the company’s health reimbursement account plans or health savings account plan who are diagnosed with breast, lung or colorectal cancer can obtain a review of their medical records by Mayo Clinic, and when recommended, receive care covered at 100 percent for on-site visits at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center locations in Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla., or Phoenix, Ariz. [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Sep 23 5:08pm · View  

Mayo Founding Partner in Online Patient Registry for Inherited Cancer Risk

three generations of women

Rochester, Minn. – Mayo Clinic announced today that it is part of a newly formed consortium, including experts from academic medical centers and commercial genetics laboratories across the country, that has established the Prospective Registry of Multi-Plex Testing (PROMPT), an online registry for individuals and families who have undergone testing for inherited cancer-causing genetic mutations.

Co-founded by Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Penn Medicine, the goal of the registry is to provide data vital to improving our understanding of the level of risk associated with and outcomes following testing for “panels” of cancer-associated genes. The consortium is now enrolling patients in the first phase of the study.

“An enormous challenge in the practice of medicine today is that posed by panel testing of dozens of cancer genes, some of which are recently discovered and for which we do not have adequate information to guide preventive strategies,” said co-founder, Susan Domchek, M.D., director of the Basser Research Center for BRCA at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Fri, Sep 5 11:18am · View  

Mayo Buildings Light Up to Show Support for Stand Up To Cancer

Shots of the Mayo Clinic Plummer building at night lit up with the stand up to cancer colors.

Plummer building lit for Stand Up To Cancer

On the evening of Sept. 5, Mayo Clinic buildings in Rochester Minn. and Phoenix be illuminated with orange, red and yellow lights to show support for Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) A charitable program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation, SU2C raises funds to accelerate the pace of research to get new therapies to patients quickly and save lives.

Mayo Clinic physicians Svetomir, Markovic, M.D., Ph.D. in Rochester and Alexander Sekulic, M.D., Ph.D. in Phoenix both participate on the SU2C melanoma Dream Team. Dream Teams are ccollaborative, multidisciplinary, scientific research teams that form the cornerstone of SU2C’s commitment to developing cancer breakthroughs. SU2C currently funds ten Dream Teams and an International Translational Research Team that includes 92 institutions worldwide.

Friday is also the day SU2C will broadcast its fourth star-studded, one-hour fundraising telecast featuring performances and appearances from top recording artists and celebrities. The live, commercial-free program will be broadcast on all major networks including ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC as well as HBO and Showtime.

Journalists: broll of the Plummer building in Rochester and the Phoenix hospital with the Stand Up To Cancer lighting is available in the downloads below.

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Aug 19 2:23pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Investigator to Lead Alliance Research Base for New National, Community-based Cancer Research Initiative

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Jan Buckner, M.D., a five-year, $47.5 million grant to lead the NCI’s National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) research base for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Buckner is deputy director for cancer practice at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, where the Alliance research base will be located.Cancer wordsJan Buckner M.D

NCORP is a national network of cancer investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions and other organizations that provide care to diverse populations in community-based health care practices across the United States. NCORP will design and conduct trials to improve cancer prevention, cancer control, screening and post-treatment management.

The Alliance research base at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Minnesota will be one of seven research bases across the country that will design and conduct multicenter cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research. NCORP hubs will also provide overall administration, data management, scientific leadership and regulatory compliance for the NCORP program.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Tue, Aug 12 2:34pm · View  

Mayo Study Finds Less Radical Procedures Offer Similar Cancer Control Compared to Surgery for Kidney Cancer Patients

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Needle-guided tumor destruction procedures offer near equivalent lengths of local cancer control compared to surgery for patients with small kidney cancer tumors, according to the results of a large study published in the journal European Urology. “If validated, these data suggest that an update to clinical guidelines would be warranted,” says the study’s lead author, R. Houston Thompson, M.D., a Mayo Clinic urologist.

Dr. Thompson says radical nephrectomy – surgical removal of the entire kidney – has historically been the standard of care for management of kidney cancer; however, partial nephrectomy – surgical removal of tumors from a kidney while sparing healthy tissue –has become increasingly more common because of its nephron-sparing benefits and similar cancer control. The nephron is the part of the kidney that filters out toxins from the blood.

“We undertook this study because direct comparisons of outcomes among patients with kidney cancer who have received partial nephrectomy (PN), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) – tumor destruction using intense heat and cryoablation – tumor destruction using extreme cold – are lacking, especially from institutions that routinely perform all three of these procedures,” Dr. Thompson says.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Thompson are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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