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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz)

Activity by Jennifer Schutz

Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Thu, Sep 18 10:16am · View  

Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine Forms Collaboration with National University Ireland Galway

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine and colleagues at the National University Ireland Galway have signed a formal memorandum of understanding (MOU) to pave the way for joint clinical trials using regenerative therapies.

The MOU follows years of close collaboration with NUI Galway’s Regenerative Medicine Institute (REMEDI) and the Network of Excellence for Functional Biomaterials (NFB) and will focus on adult stem cell therapy, gene therapy, biomaterials and biomedical engineering. Furthermore, the agreement facilitates ongoing student and staff exchange between Galway and the United States.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jennifer Schutz, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Windebank are in the downloads.

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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Mon, Dec 16 2013 · View  

Regenerative Medicine: Mayo Clinic and Collaborators Develop New Tool for Transplanting Stem Cells

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Dec. 16, 2013 — Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues in Belgium have developed a specialized catheter for transplanting stem cells into the beating heart. The novel device includes a curved needle and graded openings along the needle shaft, allowing for increased distribution of cells. The result is maximized retention of stem cells to repair the heart. The findings appear in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions

“Although biotherapies are increasingly more sophisticated, the tools for delivering regenerative therapies demonstrate a limited capacity in achieving high cell retention in the heart,” says Atta Behfar, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiology specialist and lead author of the study. “Retention of cells is, of course, crucial to an effective, practical therapy.”

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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Mon, Sep 30 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Apply Regenerative Medicine to Battlefield Injuries

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Sept. 30, 2013  — Mayo Clinic researchers are part of the second phase of a national consortium that focuses on developing innovative medical treatments for wounded veterans. Mayo's role will emphasize peripheral nerve regeneration. Mayo's principal investigator is Anthony Windebank, M.D., a neurologist and deputy director for discovery in the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine. Other organizations will focus on head and face trauma, burns, transplants and other conditions.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video resources, including interviews with Dr. Windebank, are available for journalists at the Mayo Clinic News Network.

"The opportunity to work together with a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional team that will create new therapies for our injured service members is a privilege, and we are proud that Mayo Clinic will be able to make a contribution to this effort," says Dr. Windebank. Other Mayo investigators include Michael Yaszemski, M.D., Ph.D., biomedical engineering and orthopedics; Allen Bishop, M.D., orthopedics; Alexander Shin, M.D., orthopedics; and Robert Spinner, M.D., neurologic surgery. [...]

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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Tue, Sep 3 2013 · View  

Mayo Clinic Restores Disrupted Heartbeat with Regenerative Intervention

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Sept. 3, 2013 — Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to resynchronize cardiac motion following a heart attack using stem cells. Scientists implanted engineered stem cells, also known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, into damaged regions of mouse hearts following a heart attack. This regenerative approach successfully targeted the origin of abnormal cardiac motion, preventing heart failure. The findings appear in the September issue of the Journal of Physiology.

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video resources, including interviews with Drs. Terzic and Yamada, are available for journalists at theMayo Clinic News Network.

"The discovery introduces — for the first time — stem cell-based 'biological resynchronization' as a novel means to treat cardiac dyssynchrony," says Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study. Dr. Terzic is the Michael S. and Mary Sue Shannon Family Director, Center for Regenerative Medicine, and the Marriott Family Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases Research. [...]

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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Wed, Nov 28 2012 · View  

Stem Cell 101: Mayo Clinic Expert Answers Commonly Asked Questions

ROCHESTER, Minn. — November 28, 2012.  Next week, more than 1,200 people from 25 countries are expected to attend the 8th Annual World Stem Cell Summit" in West Palm Beach, Fla., a gathering sponsored by Mayo Clinic. As those close to the science explore potential stem cell applications, many patients have questions about what stem cells are and how they are being used. Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., director of Mayo Clinic's Regenerative Medicine Consult Service, answers some of the most commonly asked questions about stem cells:

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Multimedia resources, including a Medical Edge package, are available for journalists to download on the Mayo Clinic News Network.

What are stem cells?

Stem cells are the body's raw materials. These cells have the ability to renew themselves or change to become specialized cells with a petri dishmore specific function, such as blood cells, brain cells, heart muscle or bone.

Where do stem cells come from?

  • Adult stem cells are found in tissues of the body, such as bone marrow. Emerging evidence suggests that adult stem cells may be more versatile than previously thought and have the ability to create other types of cells.
  • Amniotic fluid stem cells come from the liquid that surrounds a developing fetus in the amniotic sac. More study of amniotic fluid stem cells is needed to understand their potential.
  • Embryonic stem cells are a general stem cell found in embryos. Use of this type of stem cell has significantly declined due to the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells.
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells, commonly known as iPS cells, are derived from an adult stem cell that behaves like an embryonic stem cell. This new technique may help researchers avoid the controversy that comes with embryonic stem cells and prevent immune system rejection of the new stem cells.
  • Mesenchymal stem cells are adult stem cells found in tissues such as bone marrow, blood and the fallopian tube. They can become bone, cartilage, fat and possibly other cells.

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Jennifer Schutz (@jschutz) posted · Tue, Sep 25 2012 · View  

Mayo Clinic Finds Way to Weed Out Problem Stem Cells, Making Therapy Safer

ROCHESTER, Minn. — September 25, 2012.  Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to detect and eliminate potentially troublemaking stem cells to make stem cell therapy safer. Induced Pluripotent Stem cells, also known as iPS cells, are bioengineered from adult tissues to have properties of embryonic stem cells, which have the unlimited capacity to differentiate and grow into any desired types of cells, such as skin, brain, lung and heart cells. However, during the differentiation process, some residual pluripotent or embryonic-like cells may remain and cause them to grow into tumors.

petri dish

MULTIMEDIA ALERT: Video resources, including an interview with Dr. Nelson will be available for journalists at the Mayo Clinic News Network.

"Pluripotent stem cells show great promise in the field of regenerative medicine; however, the risk of uncontrolled cell growth will continue to prevent their use as a therapeutic treatment," says Timothy Nelson, M.D., Ph.D., lead author on the study, which appears in the October issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine.

Using mouse models, Mayo scientists overcame this drawback by pretreated stem cells with a chemotherapeutic agent that selectively damages the DNA of the stem cells, efficiently killing the tumor-forming cells. The contaminated cells died off, and the chemotherapy didn't affect the healthy cells, Dr. Nelson says.

"The goal of creating new therapies is twofold: to improve disease outcome with stem cell-based regenerative medicine while also ensuring safety. This research outlines a strategy to make stem cell therapies safer for our patients while preserving their therapeutic efficacy, thereby removing a barrier to translation of these treatments to the clinic," says co-author Alyson Smith, Ph.D.

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