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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein)

Media Relations Specialist 

Activity by Kelley Luckstein

Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Thu, May 21 4:54pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Trauma Expert: Preventing Pediatric Falls

ROCHESTER, Minn. — When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls.

There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall.

Falls can happen anywhere but some of the most common mechanisms for kids’ falls are from playground equipment, off changing tables, off infant seats placed on high surfaces, from baby walkers, out of shopping carts and out of windows. When children fall out of windows, the injuries that result are more serious than other types of falls.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Tue, May 19 3:08pm · View  

Mayo Campuses Recognized by Practice Greenhealth for Strong Environmental Efforts

Logo with two leaves and it says 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald AwardROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic campuses were recently recognized by Practice Greenhealth for its efforts in responsible environmental practices.

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wis., received the 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award for demonstrating superior sustainability programs and cross-functional excellence. A Circles of Excellence award was also received for having shown outstanding performance for commitment to preserving water. In addition to these practices, other sustainability efforts include increasing the use of cooling towers that saved 14.3 million gallons of water; restoring natural prairie habitats on the grounds around buildings to reduce watering needs; 6,400 pounds of carbon dioxide were diverted from the air by conserving energy through efficient lighting, heating and cooling systems; and 11,000 pounds of plastic and 845 pounds of cardboard were diverted from landfills through recycling.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Fri, Apr 24 10:41am · View  

Mayo Named a DiversityInc Top Hospital and Health System Four Consecutive Years

Blue, Black and White Logo that says: DiversityInc 2015 Top 5 Hospitals and Health SystemsROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic earned No. 3 on the 2015 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospitals and Health Systems list for its continued commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is the fourth year that Mayo has earned a spot on the list. This year's rankings were announced at the annual DiversityInc Top 50 event in New York on April 23.

“Mayo Clinic is beginning a deep dive into understanding unconscious bias and how it affects both our staff and the patients under our care,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo’s director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. “Putting the needs of the patient first means asking difficult questions about where bias exists in medicine and then finding the most effective ways to intervene.”

Companies named to the list are measured in four key areas:

  • CEO/Leadership Commitment
  • Talent Pipeline
  • Equitable Talent Development
  • Supplier Diversity

Mayo Clinic’s workforce brings together people with diverse talents, experiences and beliefs to provide high quality, culturally appropriate care to its patients. Mayo Clinic continues to embrace diversity and inclusion by creating a welcoming environment where individual differences are valued, allowing each person to achieve and contribute to his or her fullest potential. [...]

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Thu, Apr 23 11:39am · View  

Exploring Treatment Options for Women with Fibroids

Mayo Clinic expert demonstrates women have options that preserve the uterus

Medical illustration of a woman's reproductive system highlighting the different types of uterine fibroids

There are three major types of uterine fibroids. Intramural fibroids grow within the muscular uterine wall. Submucosal fibroids bulge into the uterine cavity. Subserosal fibroids project to the outside of the uterus.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A 47-year-old African-American woman has heavy menstrual bleeding and iron-deficiency anemia. She reports the frequent need to urinate during the night and throughout the day. A colonoscopy is negative and an ultrasonography shows a modestly enlarged uterus with three uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths of the uterus. She is not planning to become pregnant. What are her options?

Elizabeth (Ebbie) Stewart, M.D., chair of Reproductive Endocrinology at Mayo Clinic, says the woman has several options, but determining her best option is guided by her symptoms, the size, number and location of the fibroids, as well as where she is in her reproductive life span. These options are highlighted in a Clinical Practice article by Dr. Stewart in this month’s New England Journal of Medicine.

“Uterine-conserving therapy should be an available option for women even if there is no plan for childbearing,” says Dr. Stewart, a uterine fibroid researcher. “Although myomectomy, a surgical procedure to remove uterine fibroids, is the traditional alternative to hysterectomy, there are other options for medical and interventional treatment. Before determining which alternative therapy may be an option, the symptoms caused by fibroids must first be assessed.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Stewart are available in the downloads.

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Wed, Mar 25 4:03pm · View  

Work Site Wellness Centers Equate to Weight Loss and Health Care Savings

ROCHESTER, Minn. — As employees and employers face higher health care costs, work site wellnessMale and females cycling in a fitness class centers are becoming increasingly more important to help control the costs of health care and encourage healthy lifestyle behaviors among the workforce, a Mayo Clinic study says.

Research published this month in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows that members of Mayo Clinic’s employee wellness center, the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center (DAHLC), who regularly participated in wellness activities, experienced significant weight loss and health care costs savings.

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Mon, Mar 9 10:37am · View  

Preterm Babies Receive Inhaled Nitric Oxide Despite Guidance Discouragement

Nurse caring for a neonate in an incubatorROCHESTER, Minn. — Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. Still, the drug is commonly being used in this population, Mayo Clinic Children’s Center and co-authors say in a study published today in the journal Pediatrics.

A 2011 statement released by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) indicated that available evidence did not support the routine use of iNO in preterm neonates and discouraged the use of this expensive therapy in preterm neonates. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a report with similar statements.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Thu, Mar 5 9:36am · View  

Mayo Clinic Named to Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” List

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Fortune magazine named Mayo Clinic to its list of the “100 Best Companies Magazine cover with male hands creating a heart with his hands with the words "Best Companies to Work For" on the cover.to Work For” in 2015. This is Mayo’s 12th consecutive year on the magazine’s annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees. The list ranks Mayo Clinic 73 overall among the top 100 companies.

“We congratulate our employees for earning Mayo Clinic this distinction,” says John H. Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. “We hope they take great pride in this ‘100 Best’ national recognition.”

Mayo Clinic was selected among hundreds of companies vying for a place on the list this year. Applicant companies opt to participate in the selection process, which includes an employee survey and an in-depth questionnaire about their programs and company practices. Great Place to Work® then evaluates each application using its unique methodology based on five dimensions: credibility, respect, fairness, pride and camaraderie. Great Place to Work® has found that employeeGonda-300x199s believe they work for great organizations when they consistently trust the people they work for, have pride in what they do and enjoy the people they work with.

Information from the survey of Mayo Clinic employees is available on the Great Rated! site.

The print copy of Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” edition will be on
newsstands March 9.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Thu, Feb 12 4:16pm · View  

Medication Therapy Can Increase Long-Term Success For Smokers Who Cut Back First

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A study of more than 1,500 cigarette smokers who were not ready to quit smoking but were willing to cut back on cigarette consumption and combine their approach with varenicline (Chantix) increased their long-term success of quitting smoking. The multinational study is published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Jon Ebbert, M.D., associate director for research in the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, was lead author on the study that reported the effects of the prescription medication varenicline for increasing smoking abstinence rates among smokers who wanted to reduce the number of cigarettes they smoked before trying to quit completely.

Image of cigarettes with Quit Smoking title“This study is important because this opens the door to treatment for approximately 14 million smokers who have no intention of quitting in the next 30 days but are willing to reduce their smoking rate while working toward a quit attempt,” says Dr. Ebbert. “In the past, these smokers may have not received medication therapy, and we want them to know that different approaches are available.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Ebbert are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bryan Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005 
Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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