KelleyLuckstein

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6 days ago by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Study Shows Association Among Childhood ADHD, Sex and Obesity

Child playing hopscotch on playground outdoors
ROCHESTER, Minn. — The incidence of childhood and adult obesity has increased significantly over the past three decades. New research shows that there is an association between obesity development during adulthood and childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Mayo Clinic researchers led the multi-site study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Although various studies propose a connection between childhood ADHD and obesity, “this is the first population-based longitudinal study to examine the association between ADHD and development of obesity using ADHD cases and controls of both sexes derived from the same birth cohort,” says lead author Seema Kumar, M.D., pediatrician and researcher at Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center.

The study included 336 individuals with childhood ADHD born from 1976 to 1982 and matched with 665 non-ADHD controls of the same age and sex. Weight, height and stimulant treatment measurements were gathered from medical records detailing care provided from Jan. 1, 1976, through Aug. 31, 2010. Cox models were used to assess the link between ADHD and obesity.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

The researchers found that females with childhood ADHD were at a two-fold greater risk of developing obesity during childhood and adulthood compared to females without ADHD. Obesity was not associated with stimulant treatment among childhood ADHD cases. “Females with ADHD are at risk of developing obesity during adulthood, and stimulant medications used to treat ADHD do not appear to alter that risk,” Dr. Kumar says.

There is a need for greater awareness regarding the association between ADHD and obesity in females among patients, caregivers and health care providers, Dr. Kumar adds.

This study encourages all patients with ADHD to engage in preventive measures, specifically healthy eating and an active lifestyle, as part of routine care to prevent obesity.

As a result of this study, Dr. Kumar and her team are researching the effect of specific psychiatric comorbidities commonly seen in individuals with ADHD on the development of obesity.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Rochester Epidemiology Project grant R01-AG034676.

Additional authors of the study are:

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

About Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research and clinical epidemiology. Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available online at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org.

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Dec 28, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Childhood Asthma May Increase Risks of Shingles

young boy with inhaler for asthma 16x9

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Nearly 1 million incidences of herpes zoster, which is also known as shingles, occur every year in the U.S., with an estimated one-third of all adults affected by age 80. Despite its prevalence, particularly between ages 50 and 59, it is still unclear why some individuals will develop shingles, and others will not. In a population-based study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI), Mayo Clinic researchers build on their previous research from 2013, which linked asthma in childhood with an increased risk of shingles.

“Asthma represents one of the five most burdensome chronic diseases in the U.S., affecting up to 17 percent of the population,” says lead author Young Juhn, M.D., who is a general academic pediatrician and asthma epidemiologist at the Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The effect of asthma on the risk of infection or immune dysfunction might very well go beyond the airways.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Video and audio sound bites with Dr. Juhn are available in the downloads. 

Medical records for potential patients with shingles were reviewed in Olmsted County, Minnesota, where 371 cases with shingles — age 67 on average — were identified during the study period and compared against 742 control subjects. Of the 371 shingles cases, 23 percent (87 individuals) had asthma, compared with 15 percent (114 of 742) from the control group. The authors found that adults with asthma were at about a 70 percent greater risk of developing shingles, compared to those without asthma.

The researchers also noted that, with asthma and other atopic conditions accounted for, both asthma and atopic dermatitis were found to be independently associated with a higher risk of shingles. Shingles occurred at a rate of 12 percent in patients with atopic dermatitis (45 of 371 shingles cases) versus 8 percent (58 of 742) of the control subjects.

The underlying mechanisms are not clear; however, impairment in innate immune functions in the skin and airways is well-documented in patients with asthma or atopic dermatitis. Researchers believe that, because asthma helps suppress adaptive immunity, it may increase the risk of varicella zoster virus reactivation.

“As asthma is an unrecognized risk factor for zoster in adults, consideration should be given to immunizing adults aged 50 years and older with asthma or atopic dermatitis as a target group for zoster vaccination,” Dr. Juhn concludes.

The researchers note that neither inhaled corticosteroids nor vaccinations were associated with a higher risk of shingles. Rather, zoster vaccination was associated with a lower risk of shingles.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

 

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KelleyLuckstein

Dec 21, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Expert alert: Pertussis — What to look for and when to be treated

sick child coughing

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, has been found in the Rochester community. Many Rochester schools, sports teams and day care providers are affected by this outbreak.

Pertussis is a contagious bacterial illness spread when a person coughs or sneezes. Those at greatest risk of medical complications include infants less than 1 year old; patients with chronic respiratory illnesses, including moderate to severe asthma; women in the third trimester of pregnancy; and patients with compromised immune systems.

Symptoms are similar to a common cold, such as runny nose, nasal congestion, red, watery eyes, fever and cough; however, the cough gradually becomes a severe hacking cough. In young children, this can lead to repeated coughing followed by a high-pitched intake of breath that sounds like a “whoop.”

Mayo Clinic experts advise if you or your child has had a cough for seven or more days, contact your medical provider. Individuals who are suspected to have pertussis must be tested and, if diagnosed, will be treated with antibiotics.

Robert Jacobson, M.D., a pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, advises, “Those exposed to pertussis should stay home and away from friends, neighbors, school and work until the tests results are negative. If a person is tested positive, he or she should remain quarantined for five days while he or she is being treated with antibiotics.”

Those diagnosed with pertussis who have had the illness fewer than 21 days should be treated with antibiotics to prevent the spread. Without antibiotic treatment, the patient will be contagious for up to 21 days, says Dr. Jacobson.

He adds that the best way to prevent pertussis is with the tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine. Those 11 years and older who have not had the Tdap vaccine should receive it now. Also, all pregnant women should receive additional doses of Tdap during each pregnancy between 27 and 36 weeks.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Nov 3, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic announces 2015 Distinguished Alumni Awards

Recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award: (left to right) Kristina Rother, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D. Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.

Recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award: (left to right) Kristina Rother, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D. Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — C. Garrison Fathman, M.D.; Bernard Gersh, M.B., Ch.B., D.Phil.; Audrey Nelson, M.D.; and Kristina Rother, M.D., have been named recipients of the 2015 Mayo Clinic Distinguished Alumni Award. The award honors individuals who exemplify Mayo Clinic’s ideals and mission. The honorees were recently recognized at a private event in Rochester.

Garrison Fathman, M.D., is chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology and professor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He also is director of the Center for Clinical Immunology at Stanford; co-director of the Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection; principal investigator of the Stanford Rheumatology Training Grant; and chair of the Autoimmunity Centers of Excellence U19 at Stanford.

Dr. Fathman has made numerous contributions to his field in clinical immunology, including early experiments using peptides of auto-antigens to reverse and prevent autoimmunity and studies identifying the role of different T-cell subsets in autoimmunity and transplantation rejection.

MEDIA CONTACT:  Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Oct 2, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic to Celebrate Heritage Days Oct. 5–9

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic’s annual Heritage Days celebration takes place next week, Oct. 5–9. An array of celebratory events and activities will be held across the institution to thank all of the dedicated employees and volunteers who provide service to patients. All events and activities are free and open to the public.

The theme of this year’s Heritage Days is "Salute to Service,” which honors the involvement of various generations of Mayo Clinic employees and supporters of the armed forces who served on the battlefield and homefront.

The year 2015 marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, during which William Worrall Mayo, M.D., moved to Rochester upon his appointment as an enrolling surgeon for the Union Army, as well as the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, during which Mayo Clinic provided innovative medical science.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Sep 24, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Kids with asthma exposed to secondhand smoke have twice as many hospitalizations

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children’s Research Center. “The results of this review serve as a reminder to parents of just how dangerous it is to expose their children to secondhand smoke,” says Avni Joshi, M.D., senior author and pediatric allergist and immunologist at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center. “We knew that kids should not be exposed to tobacco, but how bad their asthma is likely to be with tobacco exposure was not clear. This study helped us quantify that risk, and so it informs as well as empowers us with the risk assessment. A child is twice as likely to end up in the hospital with an asthma flare if family members continue to smoke.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Joshi are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sep 10, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Immunize kids to keep the community healthy from the flu

Olmsted County area public and private schools offering school-located influenza vaccination clinics

get your flu shot spelled out with magnet lettersROCHESTER, Minn. — “Everyone needs to get the flu vaccine every year, and, this year, the school-based immunization program of Olmsted County is bigger than ever, making it easier for more families to get their school children vaccinated on time,” says Robert Jacobson, M.D., pediatrician and medical director of the Employee and Community Health Immunization Program at Mayo Clinic. “This year, for the first time, we will bring the flu vaccine program to every middle school in the county and four of the seven high schools. That’s great news for parents.”

Kids easily spread influenza, and they carry the virus home to their families. Kids miss school, and parents miss work.

That’s why Mayo ClinicOlmsted Medical CenterOlmsted County Public Health and Olmsted County area private and public schools are teaming up to vaccinate children at their schools.

The clinics will operate at 47 schools across Olmsted County Sept. 14-Oct. 9. Visit http://www.semnic.org/schoolfluclinics.aspx to register your child for the school-located influenza vaccination program. You also can visit your school’s website for more information.

Media contacts:
Kari Etrheim, Communications, Olmsted County Public Health Services, 507-328-7424
Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Aug 5, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Collaboration with Columbia Benefits and CBx offering employer self-funded health plans

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic Health Solutions today announced a collaboration with Columbia Benefits of Boise, Idaho, for the marketing of specified health plan management activities on CBx, a national private exchange platform.young African American couple conversing with physician, fertility

Mayo Clinic Health Solutions will offer third-party administrative services for self-funded health plans to employers through the CBx exchange. Mayo Clinic Health Solutions will be offering the CIGNA national PPO network. This CBx offering will be available in Idaho, Washington, Florida, Texas and Arizona for effective dates beginning Jan. 1, 2016. Columbia Benefits CBx will also make Mayo Clinic’s pFamilia que prepara la comidaopulation health and wellness tools available to all members on the exchange. This will include Mayo Clinic Healthy Living online, Ask Mayo Clinic nurse telephone line and Ask Mayo Clinic online.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein or Brian Kilen, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Jul 29, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Hysterectomy may indicate cardiovascular risk in women under age 50

woman talking to female physician about healthROCHESTER, Minn. — Hysterectomy may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk and disease, especially in women under 35, according to Mayo Clinic experts.

In a study recently published in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society, researchers found that women who underwent hysterectomy were much more likely to have pre-existing cardiovascular risk factors – especially obesity – than women of the same age in the control group who did not undergo hysterectomy. In particular, women under age 35 had the most cardiovascular risk factors and disease, including stroke.

“Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women, and women see primarily gynecologists between 18 years and 64 years – a time when early screening for cardiovascular disease would be important,” says lead author and Mayo Clinic OB-GYN Shannon Laughlin-Tommaso, M.D., “We wanted to do this study to find a gynecologic screening method for cardiovascular disease.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein and Katie Pak, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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May 21, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic Trauma Expert: Preventing Pediatric Falls

ROCHESTER, Minn. — When people think of kids and trauma, they often think about car accidents. “However, in reality, falls are the leading cause of childhood injury and most of them happen around the home,” says Christopher Moir, M.D., pediatric surgeon at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, who has cared for a wide variety of injuries related to falls.

There are approximately 8,000 children treated in emergency rooms for falls every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At Mayo Clinic’s Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, 35 percent of the children cared for in 2014 were the result of a fall.

Falls can happen anywhere but some of the most common mechanisms for kids’ falls are from playground equipment, off changing tables, off infant seats placed on high surfaces, from baby walkers, out of shopping carts and out of windows. When children fall out of windows, the injuries that result are more serious than other types of falls.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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May 19, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Campuses Recognized by Practice Greenhealth for Strong Environmental Efforts

Logo with two leaves and it says 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald AwardROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic campuses were recently recognized by Practice Greenhealth for its efforts in responsible environmental practices.

Mayo Clinic Health System in Eau Claire, Wis., received the 2015 Practice Greenhealth Emerald Award for demonstrating superior sustainability programs and cross-functional excellence. A Circles of Excellence award was also received for having shown outstanding performance for commitment to preserving water. In addition to these practices, other sustainability efforts include increasing the use of cooling towers that saved 14.3 million gallons of water; restoring natural prairie habitats on the grounds around buildings to reduce watering needs; 6,400 pounds of carbon dioxide were diverted from the air by conserving energy through efficient lighting, heating and cooling systems; and 11,000 pounds of plastic and 845 pounds of cardboard were diverted from landfills through recycling.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Apr 24, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Named a DiversityInc Top Hospital and Health System Four Consecutive Years

Blue, Black and White Logo that says: DiversityInc 2015 Top 5 Hospitals and Health SystemsROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic earned No. 3 on the 2015 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospitals and Health Systems list for its continued commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is the fourth year that Mayo has earned a spot on the list. This year's rankings were announced at the annual DiversityInc Top 50 event in New York on April 23.

“Mayo Clinic is beginning a deep dive into understanding unconscious bias and how it affects both our staff and the patients under our care,” says Sharonne Hayes, M.D., Mayo’s director of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion. “Putting the needs of the patient first means asking difficult questions about where bias exists in medicine and then finding the most effective ways to intervene.”

Companies named to the list are measured in four key areas:

  • CEO/Leadership Commitment
  • Talent Pipeline
  • Equitable Talent Development
  • Supplier Diversity

Mayo Clinic’s workforce brings together people with diverse talents, experiences and beliefs to provide high quality, culturally appropriate care to its patients. Mayo Clinic continues to embrace diversity and inclusion by creating a welcoming environment where individual differences are valued, allowing each person to achieve and contribute to his or her fullest potential. [...]

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Apr 23, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Exploring Treatment Options for Women with Fibroids

Mayo Clinic expert demonstrates women have options that preserve the uterus

Medical illustration of a woman's reproductive system highlighting the different types of uterine fibroids

There are three major types of uterine fibroids. Intramural fibroids grow within the muscular uterine wall. Submucosal fibroids bulge into the uterine cavity. Subserosal fibroids project to the outside of the uterus.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A 47-year-old African-American woman has heavy menstrual bleeding and iron-deficiency anemia. She reports the frequent need to urinate during the night and throughout the day. A colonoscopy is negative and an ultrasonography shows a modestly enlarged uterus with three uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths of the uterus. She is not planning to become pregnant. What are her options?

Elizabeth (Ebbie) Stewart, M.D., chair of Reproductive Endocrinology at Mayo Clinic, says the woman has several options, but determining her best option is guided by her symptoms, the size, number and location of the fibroids, as well as where she is in her reproductive life span. These options are highlighted in a Clinical Practice article by Dr. Stewart in this month’s New England Journal of Medicine.

“Uterine-conserving therapy should be an available option for women even if there is no plan for childbearing,” says Dr. Stewart, a uterine fibroid researcher. “Although myomectomy, a surgical procedure to remove uterine fibroids, is the traditional alternative to hysterectomy, there are other options for medical and interventional treatment. Before determining which alternative therapy may be an option, the symptoms caused by fibroids must first be assessed.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Stewart are available in the downloads.

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Mar 25, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Work Site Wellness Centers Equate to Weight Loss and Health Care Savings

ROCHESTER, Minn. — As employees and employers face higher health care costs, work site wellnessMale and females cycling in a fitness class centers are becoming increasingly more important to help control the costs of health care and encourage healthy lifestyle behaviors among the workforce, a Mayo Clinic study says.

Research published this month in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows that members of Mayo Clinic’s employee wellness center, the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center (DAHLC), who regularly participated in wellness activities, experienced significant weight loss and health care costs savings.

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Mar 9, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Preterm Babies Receive Inhaled Nitric Oxide Despite Guidance Discouragement

Nurse caring for a neonate in an incubatorROCHESTER, Minn. — Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. Still, the drug is commonly being used in this population, Mayo Clinic Children’s Center and co-authors say in a study published today in the journal Pediatrics.

A 2011 statement released by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) indicated that available evidence did not support the routine use of iNO in preterm neonates and discouraged the use of this expensive therapy in preterm neonates. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a report with similar statements.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Mar 5, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic Named to Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” List

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Fortune magazine named Mayo Clinic to its list of the “100 Best Companies Magazine cover with male hands creating a heart with his hands with the words "Best Companies to Work For" on the cover.to Work For” in 2015. This is Mayo’s 12th consecutive year on the magazine’s annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees. The list ranks Mayo Clinic 73 overall among the top 100 companies.

“We congratulate our employees for earning Mayo Clinic this distinction,” says John H. Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. “We hope they take great pride in this ‘100 Best’ national recognition.”

Mayo Clinic was selected among hundreds of companies vying for a place on the list this year. Applicant companies opt to participate in the selection process, which includes an employee survey and an in-depth questionnaire about their programs and company practices. Great Place to Work® then evaluates each application using its unique methodology based on five dimensions: credibility, respect, fairness, pride and camaraderie. Great Place to Work® has found that employeeGonda-300x199s believe they work for great organizations when they consistently trust the people they work for, have pride in what they do and enjoy the people they work with.

Information from the survey of Mayo Clinic employees is available on the Great Rated! site.

The print copy of Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” edition will be on
newsstands March 9.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Feb 17, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Medication Therapy Can Increase Long-Term Success For Smokers Who Cut Back First

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A study of more than 1,500 cigarette smokers who were not ready to quit smoking but were willing to cut back on cigarette consumption and combine their approach with varenicline (Chantix) increased their long-term success of quitting smoking. The multinational study is published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Jon Ebbert, M.D., associate director for research in the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, was lead author on the study that reported the effects of the prescription medication varenicline for increasing smoking abstinence rates among smokers who wanted to reduce the number of cigarettes they smoked before trying to quit completely.

Image of cigarettes with Quit Smoking title“This study is important because this opens the door to treatment for approximately 14 million smokers who have no intention of quitting in the next 30 days but are willing to reduce their smoking rate while working toward a quit attempt,” says Dr. Ebbert. “In the past, these smokers may have not received medication therapy, and we want them to know that different approaches are available.”

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Ebbert are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bryan Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
507-284-5005 
Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Jan 13, 2015 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Expert featured in America Cooks with Chefs

Donald Hensrud,Caucasian male on camera, looking to the right. M.D., Medical Director for the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program, recently participated in the filming of a video series with America Cooks with Chefs, a nationwide health and wellness movement that paired up six contestants from across the country with award-winning celebrity chefs to teach each contestant how to create healthier versions of their favorite high-calorie dishes, without sacrificing taste.

In one of the episodes, contestant Michael Angelo Gonzales is teamed up with chef Michelle Bernstein of Miami’s Seagrape, who teaches Michael a heart-healthy version of a traditional Latin dish he enjoys, but was not helping high blood pressure. In the episode, Dr. Hensrud offers Michael advice about ways to lower his high blood pressure.

America Cooks with Chefs will highlight Mayo’s expert knowledge about health, wellness and preventive care, along with programs and products in news articles and videos around various wellness topics. In addition to those activities, the contestants will compete in a live cooking challenge at the Clinton Health Matters Initiative Conference in January 2015, where Mayo will participate in the judging at the event. [...]

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Oct 10, 2014 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic and Rochester Downtown Alliance to Host U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree

Peace, Joy and Health: Rochester’s Capitol Christmas Tree Celebration

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic and the Rochester Downtown Alliance are teaming up to host the nation’s U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree this November. For the past 50 years, a beautiful evergreen tree has appeared on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol during the holiday season. The U.S. Forest Service, in collaboration with Choose Outdoors and the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, will bring this special tree from Minnesota to Washington. It will make nearly 30 community stops along the way, including the Rochester Peace Plaza on Friday, Nov. 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be free and the public is welcome.

Here is a video of the lighting of the 2013 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree (Source: U.S. Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture)

As part of the upcoming celebration, children from Civic League Day Nursery and students from Mayo High School participated in a tree planting in front of Mayo Clinic's Mayo Building this week during Mayo's Heritage Days festivities. The students also decorated the tree with ornaments made from local children.

“The last time the Capitol Christmas Tree came from a forest in Minnesota was 1992 so this is a special event,” says Jane Matsumoto, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, one of the event organizers. “The visit of the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree is an opportunity to highlight the wonderful forests and the Native American heritage of Minnesota. It is also a time for our community to celebrate joy, peace and health, the theme of the Rochester event. Over 1,000 ornaments were made by Rochester and Winona school children earlier this fall and these have already been shipped to Washington D.C., to be hung on the tree when it arrives.”

Media Contacts:

Laura Archbold, Encore Public Relations, 507-202-2652, laura@encorepublicrelations.com
Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Oct 2, 2014 by KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic Celebrates Heritage Days, Oct. 6–10

Blue ribbon with the words "Mayo Clinic Heritage Days 2014"ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic’s annual Heritage Days celebration takes place Oct. 6–10, 2014. The events being held across the Mayo Clinic campuses in Rochester, Florida, Arizona and Mayo Clinic Health System will recognize and thank all of the dedicated employees and volunteers who provide service to patients. This year’s events continue the yearlong commemoration of Mayo Clinic’s 150 years of serving humanity.

The event brings together exhibits, activities, talented performers and artisans to celebrate the arts, culture, history and community spirit of Mayo Clinic. All events are free and open to the public. [...]

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