Mayo Clinic News Network

News Resources

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky)

Activity by Kevin Punsky

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Thu, Jan 8 11:38am · View  

Mayo Researchers Find Cancer Biopsies Do Not Promote Cancer Spread

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A study of more than 2,000 patients by researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has dispelled the myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread. In the Jan. 9 online issue of Gut, they show that patients who received a biopsy had a better outcome and longer survival than patients who did not have a biopsy.

The image shows a pancreas tumor being biopsied with a needle as visualized by endoscopic ultrasound. The endoscope was located within the stomach (passed via the mouth). An ultrasound probe at the tip of the endoscope allows visualization of the pancreas which is located immediately next to the stomach. A long needle is guided through the endoscope and into the tumor under ultrasound guidance.

The image shows a pancreas tumor being biopsied with a needle as visualized by endoscopic ultrasound. The endoscope was located within the stomach (passed via the mouth). An ultrasound probe at the tip of the endoscope allows visualization of the pancreas which is located immediately next to the stomach. A long needle is guided through the endoscope and into the tumor under ultrasound guidance.

The researchers studied pancreatic cancer, but the findings likely apply to other cancers because diagnostic technique used in this study — fine needle aspiration — is commonly used across tumor types, says the study’s senior investigator and gastroenterologist Michael Wallace, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine.

Fine needle aspiration is a minimally invasive technique that uses a thin and hollow needle to extract a few cells from a tumor mass. A long-held belief by a number of patients and even some physicians has been that a biopsy can cause some cancer cells to spread.

While there have been a few case reports that suggest this can happen — but very rarely — there is no need for patients to be concerned about biopsies, says Dr. Wallace.

“This study shows that physicians and patients should feel reassured that a biopsy is very safe,” he says. “We do millions of biopsies of cancer a year in the U.S., but one or two case studies have led to this common myth that biopsies spread cancer.” [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Mon, Jan 5 1:20pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Names John Presutti, D.O., Chief Executive Officer of Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross

John Presutti, D.O.

John Presutti, D.O.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic has named John Presutti, D.O., as chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic Health System in Waycross (Georgia), effective March 2, 2015. Dr. Presutti succeeds Kenneth Calamia, M.D., who will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2015.

“Dr. Presutti is a wonderfully gifted and proven physician leader,” says Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. “He brings energy and passion to his work and is committed to building upon Dr. Calamia’s successful leadership and involvement in the Waycross community.”

Dr. Presutti has been with Mayo Clinic since 1997. He currently is chair of the Division of Regional Medicine in the Department of Family Medicine at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida. He also serves as medical director for Contracting and Payer Relations and is a member of the executive operations teams in Florida and Waycross. As a family practice physician, Dr. Presutti has dedicated his career to the health and well-being of his patients and the training and education of other family medicine physicians. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Tue, Dec 23 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Receive $1.2 Million from new Florida Program to Study Alzheimer’s

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Three researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida have received $1.2 million from the newly funded Florida Health Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Research Program to study various aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. The program was created earlier this year to improve the health of Floridians by researching prevention and diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Thu, Dec 18 2014 · View  

Médicos da Mayo Clinic Afirmam que Endoscopia de alta definição avaliam pólipos com precisão e que exames patológicos caros podem não ser necessários

JACKSONVILLE, Flórida, 18 de dezembro de 2014 — Pode não ser necessário o exame patológico de pólipos removidos do cólon de um paciente, segundo um amplo estudo conduzido por médicos pesquisadores da Mayo Clinic de Jacksonville, Flórida.

O estudo com 522 pacientes, publicado na edição de dezembro do Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, revelou que os gastroenterologistas experientes podem avaliar corretamente se um pólipo é pré-canceroso ou benigno, usando lentes ópticas de alta definição durante a colonoscopia. No estudo, as análises foram de 96% a 97% precisas — dependendo de qual das duas gerações de colonoscópios foi utilizada — em comparação com uma avaliação patológica dos pólipos.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Wed, Dec 17 2014 · View  

Médicos de Mayo Clinic dicen que colonoscopios de alta definición evalúan pólipos con exactitud, posiblemente convirtiendo en innecesarios a costosos exámenes patológicos

JACKSONVILLE, Florida — Los gastroenterólogos experimentados podrían no necesitar enviar a patología los pólipos extirpados del colon de un paciente, según un gran estudio realizado por médicos de Mayo Clinic en Jacksonville.

El estudio realizado en 522 pacientes y publicado en la edición de diciembre Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (Endoscopia gastrointestinal) reveló que los médicos pudieron evaluar correctamente si un pólipo era precanceroso o benigno durante la colonoscopia, gracias a lentes ópticos de alta definición. La evaluación tuvo una exactitud de 96 o 97 por ciento, dependiendo de cuál de las dos generaciones de colonoscopio se utilizó, comparado frente al examen de patología de los pólipos.

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Tue, Dec 16 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Physicians Say High-definition Scopes Accurately Assess Polyps, Costly Pathological Examinations May Not Be Necessary

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — It may not be necessary for experienced gastroenterologists to send polyps they remove from a patient’s colon to a pathologist for examination, according to a large study conducted by physician researchers at the Jacksonville campus of Mayo Clinic.

The benign hyperplastic polyp appears very pale and bland on imaging.

The benign hyperplastic polyp appears very pale and bland on imaging.

Their 522-patient study, published in the December issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, found that physicians correctly evaluated whether a polyp was precancerous or benign using high-definition optical lenses during a colonoscopy. Their assessment was 96 or 97 percent accurate — depending on which of two generations of scopes was used — compared with a standard pathological evaluation of the polyps.

The Mayo Clinic researchers conclude that the pathological polyp examination now required by national practice guidelines may not be necessary — an advance they say could result in substantial cost savings for the patient and the health care system, as well as more rapid information and recommendations for follow-up for the patient. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Fri, Dec 12 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Names Christina Zorn, J.D., as Chief Administrative Officer in Jacksonville, Florida

Christina Zorn, J.D.

Christina Zorn, J.D.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic has appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic.

She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1.

“Christina Zorn has significant experience at Mayo Clinic as well as excellent insight into the strengths of Mayo Clinic’s Florida staff and the unique challenges of the local and regional market,” says Dr. Farrugia. “I look forward to working with Christina as we continue the excellent efforts underway in delivering outstanding care to our patients, advancing research and educating the next generation of providers in Florida and throughout the Southeast.”

Zorn has been with Mayo Clinic since 2002. She began her career at Mayo Clinic as a legal counsel and now serves as the chair of the Florida division of the Legal Department. In addition, Zorn has served as an administrator for the Department of Ophthalmology in Florida and for several key initiatives.

She succeeds Robert Brigham, who has served as chief administrative officer in Florida since 2005. Brigham will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2014. Zorn will work closely with Brigham to ensure a smooth leadership transition.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746,
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Mon, Nov 10 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify First Steps in Formation of Pancreatic Cancer

Shown is a region of a pancreas with preneoplastic lesions. Red labeling indicates macrophages, green labeling indicates pancreatic acinar cells that dedifferentiate, and grey labeling indicates further progressed pancreatic lesions.

Shown is a region of a pancreas with preneoplastic lesions. Red labeling indicates macrophages, green labeling indicates pancreatic acinar cells that dedifferentiate, and grey labeling indicates further progressed pancreatic lesions.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore.

In an online issue of Cancer Discovery, the scientists described the molecular steps necessary for acinar cells in the pancreas — the cells that release digestive enzymes — to become precancerous lesions. Some of these lesions can then morph into cancer.

“Pancreatic cancer develops from these lesions, so if we understand how these lesions come about, we may be able to stop the cancer train altogether,” says the study’s lead investigator, Peter Storz, Ph.D., a cancer biologist.

he need for new treatment and prevention strategies is pressing, Dr. Storz says. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers — symptoms do not occur until the cancer is well advanced. One-year survival after diagnosis is only 20 percent. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in this country.

The scientists studied pancreatic cells with Kras genetic mutations. Kras produces a protein that regulates cell division, and the gene is often mutated in many cancers. More than 95 percent of pancreatic cancer cases have a Kras mutation.

The researchers detailed the steps that led acinar cells with Kras mutations to transform into duct-like cells with stem cell-like properties. Stem cells, which can divide at will, are also often implicated in cancer.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746.
Email: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Load More    

Loading information...

Log in

version 2.8.2.2
Page loaded in 1.351 seconds