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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky)

Activity by Kevin Punsky

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Wed, Jul 2 12:13pm · View  

Pesquisadores de Mayo Clinic revelam “achado valioso” sobre genes que têm papel fundamental no câncer de rim

JACKSONVILLE, Flórida —Análises genômicas de carcinomas de células renais de células claras (ccRCC — clear cell renal cell carcinoma) de 72 pacientes, revelaram 31 genes que são peças-chave no desenvolvimento, crescimento e disseminação do câncer, informam pesquisadores da Clínica Mayo de Jacksonville, na Flórida. Desses genes, oito não haviam sido relacionados, anteriormente, ao câncer de rim; e outros seis genes, ao que se sabia até então, nunca foram ligados a qualquer forma de câncer. O ccRCC é a forma mais comum de câncer de rim.

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Wed, Jul 2 12:14pm · View  

Investigadores de Mayo Clinic revelan valioso hallazgo de los genes clave en el Cáncer Renal

JACKSONVILLE, Florida —Un análisis genómico de células claras del carcinoma de células renales (ccRCC), la forma más común de cáncer de riñón, realizado en 72 pacientes, ha permitido descubrir 31 genes que son claves para el desarrollo, el crecimiento y la propagación del cáncer, dicen los investigadores de la Clínica Mayo de Jacksonville, en Florida. Ocho de estos genes no habían sido previamente relacionados con el cáncer de riñón, y a otros seis genes nunca se les había involucrado en ningún tipo de cáncer.

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Tue, Jul 1 8:59am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Reveal Treasure Trove of Genes Key to Kidney Cancer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A genomic analysis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, from 72 patients has uncovered 31 genes that are key to development, growth and spread of the cancer, say researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida. Eight of these genes had not been previously linked to kidney cancer, and six other genes were never known to be involved in any form of cancer.

 

Their study, in the journal Oncotarget, is the most extensive analysis to date of gene expression’s role in ccRCC tumor growth and metastasis. The ccRCC subtype accounts for 80 percent of all kidney cancer cases. [...]

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Tue, Jun 24 7:50am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Say Gene in Brain Linked to Kidney Cancer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting.

Their study, published in Cancer Research, reveals that the gene NPTX2, plays an essential role in this cancer type, which is resistant to common chemotherapy and has a five-year overall survival rate of less than 10 percent in patients with metastatic disease. [...]

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Fri, Jun 6 10:00am · View  

Endoscope with an Oxygen Sensor Detects Pancreatic Cancer, Providing Hope for Earlier Detection, Mayo Clinic Says

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — June 6, 2014 — An optical blood oxygen sensor attached to an endoscope is able to identify pancreatic cancer in patients via a simple endoscopic procedure, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

The study, published in GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, shows that the device, which acts like the well-known clothespin-type finger clip used to measure blood oxygen in patients, has a sensitivity of 92 percent and a specificity of 86 percent.

That means, of 100 patients with pancreatic cancer, this sensor would detect 92 of them, based on the findings. And of 100 patients who don’t have pancreatic cancer, the test would correctly identify them 86 percent of the time. [...]

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Thu, Jun 5 9:36am · View  

Pesquisadores da Mayo Clinic decodificam falhas em conexões cerebrais que podem causa TDAH

JACKSONVILLE, Flórida — Neurocientistas da Clínica Mayo em Jacksonville, na Flórida, e da Universidade de Aarhus, na Dinamarca, trouxeram uma luz para a compreensão de falhas na conexão dos neurônios no sistema de compensação cerebral cérebro, contribuindo para problemas como o transtorno do déficit de atenção com hiperatividade (TDAH). [...]

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Thu, Jun 5 9:29am · View  

Investigadores de Mayo Clinic descifran conexiones imperfectas en el cerebro, que posiblemente causan TDAH

JACKSONVILLE, Florida — Neurocientíficos de la Clínica Mayo en Jacksonville, Flórida, y en la Universidad de Aarhus en Dinamarca han arrojado luz sobre por qué las neuronas en el sistema de recompensa del cerebro pueden ser conectadas incorrectamente, lo que puede contribuir a problemas como el trastorno de déficit atencional con hiperactividad (TDAH). [...]

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Tue, Jun 3 2:51pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Decode How the Brain Miswires, Possibly Causing ADHD

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida and at Aarhus University in Denmark have shed light on why neurons in the brain’s reward system can be miswired, potentially contributing to disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

SorCS2 knockout

The image shows the pattern of movement of mice treatment with saline or with dex-amphetamine (ADHD medicine). Dex-amphetamine has a calming effect on mice lacking the SorCS2 gene, reminiscent of ADHD in humans.

They say findings from their study, published online today in Neuron, may increase the understanding of underlying causes of ADHD, potentially facilitating the development of more individualized treatment strategies.

The scientists looked at dopaminergic neurons, which regulate pleasure, motivation, reward, and cognition, and have been implicated in development of ADHD.

They uncovered a receptor system that is critical, during embryonic development, for correct wiring of the dopaminergic brain area. But they also discovered that after brain maturation, a cut in the same receptor, SorCS2, produces a two-chain receptor that induces cell death following damage to the peripheral nervous system.

The researchers report that the SorCS2 receptor functions as a molecular switch between apparently opposing effects in proBDNF. ProBDNF is a neuronal growth factor that helps select cells that are most beneficial to the nervous system, while eliminating those that are less favorable in order to create a finely tuned neuronal network.
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