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Jim McVeigh (@m075841)

Activity by Jim McVeigh

Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Mon, Feb 16 10:37am · View  

Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican adds Mayo Clinic “Telestroke”

3103728_0019[1]Henderson, Nev. – Southern Nevada residents in need of emergency medical care for a stroke may benefit from a Mayo Clinic “telestroke” program that is now available at all three campuses of Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican (Rose de Lima, Siena and San Martín). A recent agreement between St. Rose and Mayo Clinic in Arizona means the service featuring a portable, self-propelled robot has begun in southern Nevada. This service will compliment and augment the already robust certified stroke centers at all three campuses and Dignity Health is the first to partner with Mayo on this project in Nevada.

In telestroke care, the use of a telestroke robot located in a hospital lets a stroke patient be seen in real time by a neurology specialist at Mayo Clinic located in Phoenix. The Mayo stroke neurologist, whose face appears on the screen of the robot, consults with emergency room physicians at the sites and evaluates the patient.

Patients showing signs of stroke can be examined by the neurologist via computer, smart phone technology, portable tablets or laptops. In addition to assessment of the patient, the neurologist can view scans of the patient's brain to detect possible damage from a hemorrhage or blocked artery.

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Tue, Feb 3 11:16am · View  

Surgical Metrics Do Not Provide a Clear Path to Improvement

PHOENIX – While surgical outcomes have improved nationally over time, surgical outcome reporting does not necessarily lead to better outcomes, according to a Mayo Clinic study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Systems that capture, analyze, and report surgical outcomes are an increasingly important part of the quality improvement movement in health care in the United States.  Within the U.S., the most widely used surgical outcomes reporting system is the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), which is coordinated through the American College of Surgeons.

The study analyzed data regarding surgical outcomes — complications, serious complications, and mortality — in over 345,000 patients treated between 2009 and 2013 at academic hospitals throughout the United States.  Of these patients, approximately half were treated at hospitals that participated in the NSQIP.  The study showed that surgical outcomes significantly improved overall in both study groups during the period of analysis.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Mon, Jan 26 6:03pm · View  

Mayo and King-Devick Test Have Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Test

Phoenix, AZ — Concussions are in the national spotlight for the damage being done to student and professional athletes. Determining when an athlete should be removed from play is a major challenge in preventing injury. Athletes routinely deny symptoms.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 1.6 and 3.8 million students have concussions every year. In an effort to bring awareness and increase concussion screening, Mayo Clinic has agreed to a licensing agreement with King-Devick Test Inc., which has developed a proven indicator of ocular motor, visual and cognitive function for concussion detection and evaluation on the sidelines of sporting events to help with the decision to sideline athletes to prevent injury.

Under the terms of the agreement, King-Devick and Mayo Clinic will form a scientific governance committee and Mayo will have membership on the company’s board of directors. Packaging for the test will indicate it is offered in association with Mayo Clinic. Revenue Mayo receives will be used to support its nonprofit mission in patient care, education and research. The King-Devick Test is a quick, accurate and objective concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals, and a Mayo Clinic study indicated it detects concussions and possible 'silent' concussions.

Click here to listen to audio from today's news conference.

Click here for a transcript of today's news conference.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Mon, Jan 26 5:28pm · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic and King-Devick Test Announce Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Testing

concussion screening test logo with sports pictures
WHAT:
  Audio news conference about an agreement between Mayo Clinic and King-Devick to bring an objective
concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals.

Click here to listen to the audio from today's news conference.

WHO:  Mayo Clinic and King-Devick
David Dodick, M.D., Mayo Clinic Neurologist, Director, Mayo Clinic Concussion Program
Steve Devick, founder and developer of the King-Devick Test
WHEN:  Tuesday, Jan. 27 8:30 a.m. (MST)
CALL-IN: Journalists can join the call at: 800-768-2481.
RSVP: Emily Blahnik at blahnik.emily@mayo.edu or 507-538-7404.

INFO: Journalists who are registered members of Mayo Clinic News Network will have access to materials under embargo at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/Journalists can register at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/request-account/. [...]

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Wed, Sep 17 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Study Opens Door for Early Screening Tools for Parkinson’s Disease

PHOENIX — A smell test could someday be one of the tools to screen for people at risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a new Mayo Clinic study.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. But while tremor may be the best-known sign of Parkinson's, the disorder also commonly causes stiffness and slowing of movement. Additionally, there are many non-movement problems, including constipation, loss of the sense of smell, sleep problems, lightheadedness, urinary difficulties, depression and anxiety. The non-movement symptoms can develop many years before movement disorders.

 

Although Parkinson's disease can't be cured, medications may markedly improve symptoms. Currently, there is no accurate diagnostic test for the disease; diagnosis is based on medical history, a review of signs and symptoms, a neurological and physical examination and by ruling out other conditions. Confirmation of the disease can only be made by performing an autopsy. [...]

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Thu, Aug 7 2014 · View  

Study Finds Accuracy of Diagnosing Parkinson's is Low

word cloud for Parkinson's diseasePHOENIX — Researchers from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Banner Sun Health Research Institute have determined that many people with an early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease are not correctly diagnosed according to a study just published in the journal Neurology.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. But while tremor may be the best-known sign of Parkinson's, the disorder also commonly causes stiffness and slowing of movement. Additionally there are many non-movement problems including constipation, loss of the sense of smell, sleep problems, lightheadedness, urinary difficulties, depression and anxiety. Although Parkinson's disease can't be cured, medications may markedly improve symptoms. Currently, there is no accurate diagnostic test for the disease; diagnosis is made based on medical history, a review of signs and symptoms, a neurological and physical examination and by ruling out other conditions. Confirmation of the disease can only be made by performing an autopsy.
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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Wed, Aug 6 2014 · View  

NIH Renews Funding of Longitudinal Study of Earliest Alzheimer’s Disease Changes

Mayo Clinic Arizona campusPHOENIX, Arizona – The National Institutes of Health (NIH) renewed funding for the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute (BAI) and Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, longitudinal study of the earliest changes associated with the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease at older ages.  The award, an estimated $8.3 million over the next five years, continues NIH’s long-term support of the investigation.

The study, which began two decades ago, has been examining the subtle brain imaging, memory and thinking changes that occur in healthy late-middle-aged and older adults who have inherited from their parents either one, two or no copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE4) gene, the major genetic risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer’s.  Each additional copy of the gene significantly increases a person’s chance of developing the disease.

“We are extremely grateful to the NIH and our wonderful research volunteers for their support,” said Dr. Eric M. Reiman, BAI Executive Director and one of the study’s principal investigators. “From the beginning, this study has been driven by our interest in finding treatments to prevent or end Alzheimer’s as quickly as possible, and to provide the information and tools needed to do just that.” [...]

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Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Thu, Jul 31 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Study Says Eye-Tracking Devices Offer Added Pilot Safety

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – The use of small, portable eye-tracking devices in cockpits could be a future additional safeguard for pilots and other safety critical operators, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the July issue of Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine.

Eye movement metrics have been recognized as promising indicators of altered cognitive performance caused by hypoxia at high altitudes. Hypoxia is a lower than normal level of oxygen in your blood. To function properly, your body needs a certain level of oxygen circulating in the blood to cells and tissues. When this level of oxygen falls below a certain amount, hypoxia can cause a variety of symptoms including shortness of breath, impaired speech, slowed reaction time and passing out which can be a safety threat at high altitudes.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-4222, mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu 

 

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