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Sam Smith

Sam Smith (@scolbysmith)

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Sam Smith

Thu, Jun 18 at 8:05am EDT by Sam Smith · View  

Nancy,
I am so sorry to hear about your husband. I will reach out to Dr. Ho's research coordinator and team. You should also feel free to do so. Even discuss the study and press release with your treating oncologist; he or she may know whether application of this technology is appropriate for your husband's care. Please let me know how I can help further.
Sam

Samuel Smith | Public Affairs Specialist | Mayo Clinic | External Relations - Research Communications | 507-266-0607 office | 815-535-1902 cell | smith.samuel@mayo.edu

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Sam Smith

Tue, Jun 16 at 9:10am EDT by Sam Smith · View  

Beating Advanced Cancers: New Epigenomic Block for Advanced Cancer Progression

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — An international research team led by Mayo Clinic oncologists has found a new way to identify and possibly stop the progression of many late-stage cancers, including bladder, blood, bonebrainlung and kidney.

The precision medicine study appears online in Oncogene and focuses on kidney cancer and its metastases. Recent studies of the same epigenomic fingerprint in other cancers suggest a common pathway that could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of advanced disease across a wide variety of cancer types.

“If you think of late-stage cancer as a runaway car, most of our drugs take a shot at a tire here and there, but sometimes they miss and often they can’t stop it entirely,” says Thai Ho, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic oncologist and lead author of the study. “We believe we have identified a mechanism that seizes the cancer’s biological engine and could potentially stop it in its tracks.”

The new approach zeroes in on an epigenomic fingerprint in metastatic disease, in which the body often misinterprets a healthy genetic blueprint, producing toxic cells that run afoul of the body’s normal functions.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Nancy E

Nancy E (@nancy8) responded Wed, Jun 17 at 11:39pm EDT · View

My husband was just diagnosed today, from a biopsy done on Monday at Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, with metatstic renal cell carcinoma to the lung. I am very interested in this study and the possiblity of this helping my husband. His intial renal cell carcinoma was 10 years ago. Thank you for your research and your help

Sam Smith

Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) responded Thu, Jun 18 at 8:05am EDT · View

Nancy, I am so sorry to hear about your husband. I will reach out to Dr. Ho's research coordinator and team. You should also feel free to do so. Even discuss the study and press release with your treating oncologist; he or she may know whether application of this technology is appropriate for your husband's care. Please let me know how I can help further. Sam Samuel Smith | Public Affairs Specialist | Mayo Clinic [...]

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Sam Smith

Wed, Feb 25 at 4:37pm EDT by Sam Smith · View  

A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., Named Director of Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

~Stewart, Keith.photoROCHESTER, Minn. — A. Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., has been appointed medical director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. Dr. Stewart is a consultant in the Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine.

“I am honored to have this opportunity,” says Dr. Stewart. “We will build on the excellent work of the center to date, with a renewed focus on helping our clinicians access genomics based diagnostics and therapeutics on a routine basis to improve patient care. The integrated complex care delivered at Mayo Clinic provides a unique ability to lead in the development of precision medicine advances with global impact.”

Dr. Stewart’s own research and clinical interest is in translational genomics in multiple myeloma, including both basic and clinical research to identify novel targets for therapy in multiple myeloma. A diversity of public and private institutions currently support this work: the National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, as well as numerous partnerships with the pharmaceutical industry for clinical trials.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sam Smith

Fri, Feb 20 at 4:01pm EDT by Sam Smith · View  

Recap of Sen. Klobuchar's Tour of Mayo Clinic Biorepositories

Sen. Klobuchar with Dr. Richard Weinshilboum- CIM BiobankROCHESTER, Minn. — Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) affirmed her commitment to medical innovation and precision medicine today during a tour of the Mayo Clinic Biorepositories' new state-of-the-art space in northwest Rochester.

"President Obama made precision medicine a common term ... and I'm delighted to be here to see first-hand the work that has been going here at Mayo Clinic for quite some time," Klobuchar said. "We need to continue to support medical research and fund the NIH—we increasingly are facing international competition."Sen. Amy Klobuchar tours Mayo Clinic Biobank

Obama announced the NIH's $270 million Precision Medicine Initiative on January 20 during this year's State of the Union Address, thrusting the relatively obscure medical term into the national spotlight and launching a national dialogue about medical innovation and genomics in clinical care.

Klobuchar called the initiative "imperative" to the future of health care in the United States and a key component of the local and state economies.

"America has always been a leader (in health innovation)," Klobuchar said. "We want those dollars, those jobs, right here in Rochester, in the Twin Cities." [...]

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Sam Smith

Thu, Feb 19 at 11:09am EDT by Sam Smith · View  

MEDIA ADVISORY -- Sen. Amy Klobuchar to Tour Mayo Clinic Biobank, Discuss the Precision Medicine Initiative; Media Welcome for Tour and Interviews

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., will tour the Mayo Clinic Biobank and discuss the Precision Medicine Initiative with leadership from both the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine and Mayo Medical Laboratories. Journalists are welcome to accompany Sen. Klobuchar and join the informational tour of Mayo Clinic’s multi-million-dollar investment in precision medicine. Mayo Clinic leadership will also be available for interviews and background discussions.

laboratory researcher working in Biobank labWHO: Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar; Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., acting director, Center for Individualized Medicine; Curtis Hanson, M.D., director, Mayo Medical Laboratories.

WHAT: Walking tour of the Mayo Clinic Biobank and the Biorepositories Program of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. Photo opportunities and opportunities to discuss the Precision Medicine Initiative with Sen. Klobuchar and Mayo Clinic leadership.

WHERE: Biorepositories Building of Mayo Clinic, 2915 Valleyhigh Drive NW, Rochester, MN 55901. Entrance is behind the building.

WHEN: Friday, February 20, from 11:15 to 11:40 a.m.

NOTE: Members of the media should RSVP to 507-284-5005.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Sam Smith

Fri, Jan 30 at 11:08am EDT by Sam Smith · View  

Precision Medicine Initiative and the Mayo Clinic Biobank

Biomarkers
Mayo Clinic is excited about the national focus on individualized medicine and what the future holds. More than half ($130 million) of the total $215 million budget request, put forth by President Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative, is for a national biobanking initiative that draws on existing collections across the country. Mayo Clinic has among the country’s largest collections through the Mayo Clinic Biobank and the Biorepositories Program.President Obama addressing patients, researchers, physicians about Precision Medicine

Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have made a significant commitment to building a scalable biorepository infrastructure, which includes multiple specimen processing laboratories and centralized storage.

One of these collections is the Mayo Clinic Biobank, a collection of blood samples and health information donated by Mayo Clinic patients. The Biobank collects samples and health information from patients and other volunteers, regardless of health history. The Biobank was established at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn., and recruitment began in April 2009. Since then, the Biobank has expanded to Mayo Clinic's campuses in Jacksonville, Fla. and Scottsdale, Ariz., in addition to the Mayo Clinic Health System. The Biobank aims to enroll 50,000 Mayo Clinic patients by 2016 to support a wide array of health-related research studies at Mayo Clinic and other institutions.

Steve Thibodeau, David F. and Margaret T. Grohne Director, Biorepositories Program facts about the Mayo Clinic Biobank.

Journalists: Soundbites with Dr. Thibodeau and b-roll of the Mayo Clinic Biobank are available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Sam Smith

Fri, Jan 23 at 9:48am EDT by Sam Smith · View  

New Breast Exam Nearly Quadruples Detection of Invasive Breast Cancers in Women with Dense Breast Tissue

Rochester, Minn. — A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published this week in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (right) detected 3.6 times as many invasive cancers as digital mammography (left) in the latest study of more than 1,500 women with dense breast tissue. Results are published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (right) detected 3.6 times as many invasive cancers as digital mammography (left) in the latest study of more than 1,500 women with dense breast tissue. About half of screening-age women have dense breast tissue, which digital mammography renders the same whitish shade as tumors. Results are published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. Tumors and dense breast tissue can both appear white on a mammogram, making tumors indistinguishable from background tissue in women with dense breasts. About half of all screening-aged women have dense breast tissue, according to Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician and the senior author of this study.

MBI increased the detection rate of invasive breast cancers by more than 360 percent when used in addition to regular screening mammography, according to the study. MBI uses small, semiconductor-based gamma cameras to image the breast following injection of a radiotracer that tumors absorb avidly. Unlike conventional breast imaging techniques, such as mammography and ultrasound, MBI exploits the different behavior of tumors relative to background tissue, producing a functional image of the breast that can detect tumors not seen on mammography.

The study, conducted at Mayo Clinic, included 1,585 women with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts who underwent an MBI exam at the time of their screening mammogram.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sam Smith

Tue, Jan 20 at 9:38pm EDT by Sam Smith · View  

Five Genomics Innovations from Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

Now, at a time when we can routinely sequence a whole human genome and better understand the function of genes, individualized medicine at Mayo Clinic has been taken to the molecular level. We're using genomics and other sequencing technologies to more effectively and precisely diagnose, treat, predict and eventually prevent disease.

And that's what the Center for Individualized Medicine is all about — solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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