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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith)

Activity by Sam Smith

Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Fri, Jan 23 9:47am · View  

New Breast Exam Nearly Quadruples Detection of Invasive Breast Cancers in Women with Dense Breast Tissue

Rochester, Minn. — A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published this week in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (right) detected 3.6 times as many invasive cancers as digital mammography (left) in the latest study of more than 1,500 women with dense breast tissue. Results are published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (right) detected 3.6 times as many invasive cancers as digital mammography (left) in the latest study of more than 1,500 women with dense breast tissue. About half of screening-age women have dense breast tissue, which digital mammography renders the same whitish shade as tumors. Results are published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. Tumors and dense breast tissue can both appear white on a mammogram, making tumors indistinguishable from background tissue in women with dense breasts. About half of all screening-aged women have dense breast tissue, according to Deborah Rhodes, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physician and the senior author of this study.

MBI increased the detection rate of invasive breast cancers by more than 360 percent when used in addition to regular screening mammography, according to the study. MBI uses small, semiconductor-based gamma cameras to image the breast following injection of a radiotracer that tumors absorb avidly. Unlike conventional breast imaging techniques, such as mammography and ultrasound, MBI exploits the different behavior of tumors relative to background tissue, producing a functional image of the breast that can detect tumors not seen on mammography.

The study, conducted at Mayo Clinic, included 1,585 women with heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts who underwent an MBI exam at the time of their screening mammogram.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor or Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Tue, Jan 20 9:38pm · View  

Five Genomics Innovations from Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine or precision medicine, means tailoring diagnosis and treatment to each patient to optimize care. Patients have experienced this kind of care for 150 years at Mayo Clinic, where teams of specialists have always worked together to find answers.Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine

Now, at a time when we can routinely sequence a whole human genome and better understand the function of genes, individualized medicine at Mayo Clinic has been taken to the molecular level. We're using genomics and other sequencing technologies to more effectively and precisely diagnose, treat, predict and eventually prevent disease.

And that's what the Center for Individualized Medicine is all about — solving the clinical challenges of today and tomorrow by bringing the latest discoveries from the research laboratory to your doctor's fingertips in the form of new genomics-based tests and treatments.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Tue, Nov 25 2014 · View  

Proton Pump Inhibitors Decrease Diversity in Gut Microbiome, Increase Risk for Complications

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Before reaching for that daily antacid, you might consider what it’s doing to the trillions of bugs living in your gut. A new Mayo Clinic study in the open access journal Microbiome shows that people who regularly take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have less diversity among their gut bacteria, putting them at increased risk for infections like clostridium difficile and pneumonia, in addition to vitamin deficiencies and bone fractures.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Soundbites with Dr. DiBaise are available in the downloads. [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Fri, Oct 3 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Study Finds Chromosomal Rearrangements Help Distinguish Between Independent Primary Tumors and Metastasis

 

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A diagnostic test based on chromosomal rearrangements can trace the lineage of lung cancer to determine whether two separate lung cancers in the same patient are independent tumors or a tumor that has spread to another region of the lung, a Mayo Clinic study has found. For patients with multiple tumors, that distinction could mean the difference between early stage cancer that may be cured by surgery and incurable late-stage disease. The research is published this week in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Unfortunately, distinguishing between independent primary tumors and metastasis is a frequent dilemma for pathologists” says Marie-Christine Aubry, M.D., a Mayo Clinic pathologist and co-principal author of the study. “We need better tests to help the clinician match the treatment approach to the patient’s individual needs.”

MEDIA CONTACT:

Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Soundbites with Dr. Wigle are in the downloads. [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Mon, Sep 22 2014 · View  

Clifford Hudis, M.D., to Anchor Mayo Clinic Genomics Conference

ASCO immediate past president and Breast Cancer Research Foundation Scientific Committee Chair to offer keynote address at Individualizing Medicine 2014: From Promise to PracticeConference-feature-image

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Mayo Clinic announced today that Clifford Hudis, M.D., immediate past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), will deliver the keynote address at Individualizing Medicine 2014: From Promise to Practice.

Individualizing Medicine 2014 is scheduled for Oct. 6–8, with optional workshops and sessions before and after the conference. Presentations will cover a wide range of topics, including cardiovascular disease, the role of genomics in the pharmacy, insurance and reimbursement issues, the use of deep sequencing for predictive medicine, and more. A complete schedule and list of speakers is available on the conference website. Focused concurrent sessions are also available.


MEDIA CONTACT: Sam Smith, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005,
newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Lab b-roll and sound bites with Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., co-director, Individualizing Medicine Conference, are available in the downloads.

[...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Wed, Sep 24 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic and Invenshure Launch Oneome™

Startup company to offer next-generation sequencing-based pharmacogenomics interpretation

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic and venture catalyst Invenshure announce the launch of Oneome, a genomics interpretation company that exports Mayo’s extensive pharmacogenomics knowledge in the form of concise, actionable reports to help providers anywhere deliver the right medication at the right time.

Oneome logo tile

Oneome represents a new collaboration between the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine and Invenshure. The company's tagline is: "Helping clinicians make every prescription the right one."

Oneome reports will focus on providing pharmacogenomically driven guidance for medications with high levels of evidence in medical literature. Financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed. Mayo’s collaboration with Oneome is led by the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

“Our own genetic makeup can have a significant impact on how our bodies process and use prescription medication, which in turn affects whether or not a drug works the way our doctor intended,” says Oneome co-founder John Logan Black, M.D., a Mayo Clinic physician and co-director of the Personalized Genomics Laboratory in Mayo's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. “We have developed sophisticated decision algorithms that can help providers use genomic testing to get their prescriptions right the first time.” [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Thu, Jun 26 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Recommends New Routine Testing for some Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A Mayo Clinic-led group of researchers has discovered three subgroups of a single type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that have markedly different survival rates. These subgroups could not be differentiated by routine pathology but only with the aid of novel genetic tests, which the research team recommends giving to all patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Findings are published in the journal Blood.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Feldman are available in the downloads.

Patients whose lymphomas had TP63 rearrangements had only a 17 percent chance of living five years beyond diagnosis, compared to 90 percent of patients whose tumors had DUSP22 rearrangements. A third group of tumors, those with neither rearrangement, was associated with an intermediate survival rate. [...]

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Sam Smith (@scolbysmith) posted · Fri, Jun 13 2014 · View  

Changes in Genetic Testing Recommendations Strengthen Patient Autonomy

ROCHESTER, Minn. ― Recent modifications in recommendations regarding incidental findings (IFs) in genetic testing from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) depart from the college’s 2013 recommendations in favor of an individualized approach. Experts in the Bioethics Program of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine published a review of the updated 2014 recommendations in the journal Proceedings.

Pictured is Circos plot, depicting the results of genome sequencing. The green dots are areas that might implicate a disease, but the rest of the results may reveal information that the patient does not necessarily want to know.

Pictured is Circos plot, depicting the results of genome sequencing. The green dots represent areas that might have implications in a particular disease. The rest likely contains medical information that a patient may or may not want to know.

“The feedback from ACMG members indicated that the 2013 recommendations did not accommodate diverse patient needs,” says Jennifer McCormick, Ph.D., M.P.P., who authored the review.

The 2013 recommendations embraced an all-or-nothing philosophy, which advised patients who did not want to be informed of some, or all, IFs to forgo whole exome or whole genome sequencing (WES/WGS), according to the review. In addition, the college originally instructed that laboratories “actively search” and notify patients of pathogenic variants in genes, which raised controversy regarding patient rights.

With the 2014 recommendations, patients have more autonomy to customize their WES/WGS results based on their comfort level with knowledge, other than the original reason to seek genetic testing, says Dr. McCormick.

"This is an important discussion, and the move toward greater autonomy is good for everyone ― both patients and physicians," says Dr. McCormick. "Medicine in general is moving toward more patient autonomy and shared decision making. Genomics and individualized medicine happen to be the starkest and least well-defined examples of this trend ― we have no best practices yet."

Much genomic analysis is meant to aid the patient in making medical decisions, sometimes in the distant future, and there are often far-reaching implications for family members, say Dr. McCormick and her co-authors. These factors combine to make this type of testing very personal, especially regarding incidental findings. For example, patients can decide before testing to filter their results for only one part of their genome. This step is important because it differentiates between single-gene testing and WES/WGS. Where single-gene testing is selective, whole exome/genome sequencing is comprehensive. [...]

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