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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer)

Activity by Sharon Theimer

Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Mon, Nov 10 10:36am · View  

Blood Test Could Prevent Medication Trial and Error for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

ds00020_im02689_r7_rheumatoidarthritisthuBoston — A molecule in the blood shows promise as a marker to predict whether individual rheumatoid arthritis patients are likely to benefit from biologic medications or other drugs should be tried, a Mayo Clinic-led study shows. The protein, analyzed in blood tests, may help avoid trial and error with medications, sparing patients treatment delays and unnecessary side effects and expense. The research is among several Mayo Clinic studies presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Boston.

Researchers tested blood samples taken before rheumatoid arthritis treatment was given. The patients then were treated with anti-inflammatory biologic drugs, tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors, a new class of medications used for rheumatoid arthritis. They found that a protein made by the immune system, type 1 interferon, appears to serve as a valid marker to tell whether individual rheumatoid arthritis patients will respond to biologics, or other medications should be tried.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sharon Theimer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites of Dr. Niewold are available in the downloads below.

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Tue, Oct 28 10:29am · View  

Baby Boomers and Scoliosis: Osteoporosis Is Risk Factor

ex-ray scan showing scoliosis ROCHESTER, Minn. — For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon Paul Huddleston, M.D., explains how scoliosis develops, prevention and treatment options and a trend he is seeing in Baby Boomer women.

What is scoliosis? Scoliosis is a misshaping of the spine as seen from the front — where the spine seems shifted  right or left — or from a side view, where the spine is bent too far forward or backward, or a combination of the two. It doesn’t always cause pain: Schools started screening in elementary school or junior high in part because many children and their parents didn’t know the children had it, Dr. Huddleston says.

To arrange an interview with Dr. Huddleston, please contact Sharon Theimer in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs at 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu.  

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Huddleston are available in the downloads.    

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Wed, Sep 24 9:26am · View  

Most Breast Cancer Patients Who Had Healthy Breast Removed at Peace with Decision

More than 8 of 10 say they would make same choice again, Mayo Clinic study finds

woman discussing breast screening with medical staffROCHESTER, Minn. — More women with cancer in one breast are opting to have both breasts removed to reduce their risk of future cancer. New research shows that in the long term, most have no regrets. Mayo Clinic surveyed hundreds of women with breast cancer who had double mastectomies between 1960 and 1993 and found that nearly all would make the same choice again. The findings are published in the journal Annals of Surgical Oncology.

The study made a surprising finding: While most women were satisfied with their decision whether they followed it with breast reconstruction or not, patients who decided against reconstructive surgery were likelier to say they would choose to have both breasts removed again. In the reconstructive surgery group, women who needed additional operations due to complications, breast implant-related issues or other reasons were likelier to regret their prophylactic mastectomy, though overall, most women with breast reconstructions were satisfied with their choices.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sharon Theimer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Tue, Sep 2 8:57am · View  

Family Conflicts, Other Non-Physical Worries Before Cancer Surgery Raise Patients’ Complication Risk

Meeting non-medical needs ahead of operations can aid recovery, cut health care costs, study suggests

ROCHESTER, Minn. — How well patients recover from cancer surgery may be influenced by more than their medical conditions and the operations themselves. Family conflicts and other non-medical problems may raise their risk of surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study has found. Addressing such quality-of-life issues before an operation may reduce patients’ stress, speed their recoveries and save health care dollars, the research suggests. The study specifically looked at colon cancer patients, and found that patients with a poor quality of life were nearly three times likelier to face serious postoperative complications.Sad girl looking out window

The findings are published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery.

“We know that quality of life is a very complex thing, but we can now measure it and work with it almost like blood pressure,” says lead author Juliane Bingener, M.D., a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “We can say, ‘This is good, this is in the normal range, but this one here, that is not good, and maybe we should do something.’”

Quality of life as measured in the study is about more than happiness and how well people feel physically, Dr. Bingener says. It also includes the financial, spiritual, emotional, mental and social aspects of their lives and whether their needs are being met. [...]

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Mon, Aug 11 9:12am · View  

Emergency Gallbladder Surgery: Do You Need It, Or Can You Afford to Wait?

Study: younger, older people likelier to visit ER repeatedly with gallstone pain before surgery

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Gallstone pain is one of the most common reasons patients visit emergency rooms. Figuring out who needs emergency gallbladder removal and who can go home and schedule surgery at their convenience is sometimes a tricky question, and it isn’t always answered correctly. A new Mayo Clinic study found that 1 in 5 patients who went to the emergency room with gallbladder pain and were sent home to schedule surgery returned to the ER within 30 days needing emergency gallbladder removal. The surgical complication rate rises with the time lag before surgery, the researchers say.

Gallstones removed from a patient's gallbladder

“It makes a big difference if you get the right treatment at the right time,” says co-lead author Juliane Bingener-Casey, M.D., a gastroenterologic surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. The study is published in the Journal of Surgical Research.

Often it’s obvious who needs emergency gallbladder removal, a procedure known as cholecystectomy, who can delay it and who doesn’t need surgery at all. But sometimes patients fall into a gray area. Mayo researchers are working to develop a reliable tool to help determine the best course of action in those cases, and the newly published study is a first step, Dr. Bingener-Casey says. [...]

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Mon, Aug 4 8:59am · View  

Should You Add Enzyme Supplements to Your Shopping List? Mayo Expert Explains Pros & Cons

Rochester, Minn. — Enzyme supplements available without a prescription are becoming increasingly popular, but should everyone add them to their shopping list? Brent Bauer, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, is co-author of a new paper in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on the pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes. Here, Dr. Bauer answers some common questions about these dietary supplements:

What’s the issue?White dietary supplements on a rustic wooden scoop

Dr. Bauer: “They’ve become so popular. Like so many dietary supplements, patients are looking for something to help their health, so they’re reading about over-the-counter enzymes as one of those many dietary supplements, and all of a sudden we’re seeing sales go through the roof. A huge challenge with dietary supplements is that most haven’t been tested as most drugs are. We have a lot of information, but we don’t have definitive information. So our patients hear a lot of positive things, but they do not always hear the negatives or the side effects. So we’re trying to be very evidence-based. We don’t want to say no, there’s no reason to ever take an over-the-counter enzyme. By the same token, we don’t want to just rush out and buy it because we heard somebody say something positive on TV.”

What are some of the reasons people take enzyme supplements?

Dr. Bauer: “We have a lot of natural enzymes in our bodies. They help us digest food. There are clearly medical reasons to use enzymes. If a patient’s pancreas isn’t working, for example, that patient may need to take a medically prescribed enzyme supplement. That’s a little different story from a healthy person who wants to use over-the-counter bromelain, or papain — the enzymes that come from the pineapple and the papaya — or trypsin, or chymotrypsin. [...]

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Wed, Jul 16 9:53am · View  

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Mayo Surgeon Explains Who Needs Screening, Treatment

Bulges in body’s major blood vessel can cause potentially lethal ruptures, blood clots

Graphic of abdominal aortic aneurysmAn abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body’s major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently updated its recommendations on screening. Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon Peter Gloviczki, M.D., explains who should be watched for abdominal aortic aneurysms, how they are diagnosed and how surgery, which now includes a less invasive endovascular option, is improving survival rates:

What abdominal aortic aneurysms are: a bulge in the aorta, which is the body’s largest artery and is located in the abdomen above the belly button. The greatest risk is that the aneurysm will rupture.

“With every heartbeat there is increased pressure on the area of the aorta that has a weak wall and it bulges out, and ultimately when it reaches a certain size, it is going to rupture,” says Dr. Gloviczki, the Joe M. and Ruth Roberts Professor of Surgery at Mayo Clinic and past president of the Society for Vascular Surgery. “And rupture is a lethal complication.” [...]

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Tue, Jun 24 5:17pm · View  

Mayo expert reacts to new guidelines on abdominal aortic aneurysm screening

abaneurysmthu_jpgThe U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released recommendations Tuesday on which symptom-free patients should be screened for abdominal aortic aneurysms, potentially deadly ruptures of the body's major blood vessel.

The panel recommended one-time screening with an ultrasound for men 65 to 75 who smoke, and also for those who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetimes. It says more research is needed to determine whether screening  women in that age group who smoke or have smoked would be helpful.

Non-smoking men 65 to 75 should consult with their physician to see whether they should be screened based on their health history, such as a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It recommended against screening non-smoking women.

Mayo Clinic vascular surgeon Peter Gloviczki, M.D., welcomed the task force recommendation to screen older men with a history of tobacco use.

"It is important to screen patients because most people with abdominal aortic aneurysms don't have symptoms," says Dr. Gloviczki, a past president of the Society for Vascular Surgery.

Male gender, older age, a history of smoking, a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms and medical conditions such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol are risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms, he says.

The question of whether to screen becomes more complicated among women, Dr. Gloviczki says.

"These are the recommendations I am sure will stir some controversy," Dr. Gloviczki says. "I think there are certain situations, particularly when there's a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms, when women should be screened."

Journalists: Soundbites of Dr. Gloviczki explaining and reacting to the task force recommendations are available in the downloads below. To arrange an interview with Dr. Gloviczki, please contact Sharon Theimer in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs at newsbureau@mayo.edu or 507-284-5005.

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