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Traci Klein (@traciklein)

Activity by Traci Klein

Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Fri, Mar 20 11:00am · View  

Mayo Clinic Study First to Identify Spontaneous Coronary Artery Disease as Inherited


EMBARGO: Monday, March 23, at (11 am ET), JAMA Internal Medicine

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. The results are published in the March 23 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.

Researchers used the Mayo Clinic SCAD Registry of 412 enrollees to identify five familial cases of SCAD, comprised of three pairs of first-degree relatives (mother-daughter, identical twin sisters, sisters) and two pairs of second-degree relatives (aunt and niece, and first cousins). Researchers believe this is the first study to identify SCAD as an inherited disorder.

MEDIA CONTACT: Traci Klein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Hayes and SCAD animation are available in the downloads.

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Fri, Mar 13 10:05am · View  

Energy Drinks Raise Resting Blood Pressure, Dramatic In Those Not Used To Caffeine

Image of heart wrapped in blood pressure monitorSAN DIEGO — Healthy young adults who don’t consume caffeine regularly experienced greater rise in resting blood pressure after consumption of a commercially available energy drink — compared to a placebo drink — thus raising the concern that energy drinks may increase the risk of cardiac events, Mayo Clinic researchers found.

Results of the study will be presented Saturday, March 14, at the American College of Cardiology’s 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego.

In this study, researchers alternately gave a can of a commercially available energy drink or a placebo drink to 25 healthy young adults, age 19 to 40, and assessed changes in heart rate and blood pressure. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded before and 30 minutes after energy drink/placebo drink consumption, and were also compared between caffeine-naïve participants (those consuming less than 160 mg of caffeine per day,  the amount frequently found in a cup of coffee) and regular caffeine users (those consuming more than 160 mg of caffeine per day).

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Fri, Mar 13 9:44am · View  

Prolonged Shortened Sleep Increases Blood Pressure at Night

SAN DIEGO — People exposed to prolonged periods of shortened sleep have significant increases in blood pressure during nighttime hours, Mayo Clinic researchers report in a small study of eight participants.illustration describing how to measure blood pressure

Results of the study will be presented Sunday, March 15, at the American College of Cardiology’s 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego.

In this study, eight healthy, normal weight participants, ages 19 to 36, participated in a 16-day inpatient protocol, consisting of a four-day acclimation period followed by nine days of either sleep restriction (four hours of sleep per night) or normal sleep (nine hours of sleep per night), and three days of recovery. Twenty-four blood pressure monitoring at regular intervals was measured at each study phase.

During the nighttime, in the sleep restriction phase compared to the normal sleep phase, systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure  averaged 115/64 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) versus 105/57 mm Hg, respectively, researchers found. Furthermore, the expected fall in blood pressure during the night was suppressed when subjects had inadequate sleep. They also found that nighttime heart rate was higher with sleep restriction than in normal sleep.

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Thu, Mar 12 9:35am · View  

New Book “Caring for the Heart” Outlines History of Medical Specialization

Caring for the Heart bookROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic announced today the release of a new book, “Caring for the Heart: Mayo Clinic and the Rise of Specialization.” This historical book weaves together three important themes: major developments in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease in the 20th Century, how Mayo Clinic evolved from a family practice in Minnesota into one of the world's leading medical centers, and how the invention of new technologies and procedures promoted specialization among physicians and surgeons.

“Caring for the Heart” (Oxford, Hardcover Original, 704 Pages, $39.95, ISBN: 9780199982356) is written for general readers as well as health care professionals, historians and policy analysts. Unlike traditional institutional or disease-focused histories, this book places individuals and events in national and international contexts that emphasize the interplay of medical, scientific, technological, social, political, and economic forces that have resulted in contemporary heart care. Patient stories and media perspectives are included throughout to help general readers understand the medical and technological developments that are described.

The book is written so that readers may pick and choose the chapters of most interest to them. Another feature of the book is that readers may follow the stories without looking at the notes. Those who are interested in delving deeper into the main topics will find references that offer greater detail and additional perspectives. The descriptions and interpretations that fill the book benefit from the fact that the author has been a practicing cardiologist and medical historian for almost four decades.

MEDIA CONTACT: Traci Klein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu [...]

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Mon, Mar 9 1:33pm · View  

JAMA: One-Year Data for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in U.S. Patients

ROCHESTER, MINN — Study results of one-year data for more than 12,000 patients who had transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the United States show an overall one-year death rate of 23.7 percent and a stroke rate of 4.1 percent, according to a study published in the March 10 issue of JAMA.

“Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has become transformational for patients who need a new valve and are at high-risk for surgery or inoperable. aortic valve stenosis TAVR illustrationBut we have been lacking long-term data for this group of patients who are considering this procedure,” says study lead author David R. Holmes, Jr., M.D., a Mayo Clinic interventional cardiologist. “Before this study, we only had 30-day information. This is a milestone and will help us better guide patients and learn as physicians.”

For the study, researchers used the Transcatheter Valve Therapies Registry, developed by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology, combining 12,182 TAVR patient procedures performed from November 2011 through June 2013 and linking to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrative claims for one-year data using direct Medicare patient identifiers (name and social security numbers).

Other important results from the study are: [...]

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Tue, Feb 10 3:25pm · View  

Mayo Researcher Receives Woman's Day Red Dress Award

Virginia Miller, Ph.D.Dr. Virginia Miller, Director, Women’s Health Research Center, Mayo Clinic, director of the Women’s Health Research Center at Mayo Clinic, has spent her career researching how heart disease differs in women and men. On Feb. 10, she was honored for that work with a Woman’s Day Red Dress Award in New York City.

She received the award along with others who have made contributions in the fight against heart disease, the No. 1 killer of women today. Other award winners are: Andie MacDowell, actress and Go Red For Women spokesperson; CVS Health, the first national pharmacy chain to end tobacco sales; Margaret Hamburg, M.D., Former Commissioner of Food and Drugs, U.S. Food and Drug Administration; and Jennifer Donelan, WJLA TV ABC 7 reporter in Washington, D.C., and a heart attack survivor.

Dr. Miller’s research focuses on how sex hormones, such as estrogen and testosterone, affect the blood vessels and heart in women and men, as well as the role of other gender differences in cardiovascular health.

An important part of her research is to advocate for research that is sex-specific, meaning that research studies include both men and women, and that the results are analyzed separately by sex. Historically, and today even, that has not always happened, but it is so important, Dr. Miller says. “It is poor science to study one sex and apply the results to the other,” she says. “In the end, that does not help health care providers treat patients the best they can. With heart disease still as the No. 1 cause of death in women and men, we need to continue to research in the best ways possible in order to treat heart disease.”Red dress awards with Dr. Sharonne Hayes and Dr. Virginia Miller

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Fri, Nov 14 2014 · View  

Patients with active asthma at higher risk for heart attack, Mayo Clinic research shows

CHICAGO — Patients with active asthma  — such as any use of asthma medications, and unscheduled office or emergency visits for asthma — are at a twofold risk of having a heart attack, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014.

Heart with stethoscopeResearchers compared 543 patients who had heart attacks with 543 non-heart attack patients of the same age and gender. These patients were treated at health care facilities in Rochester, Minnesota, between 2002 and 2006. The average age of patients was 67 years old, and 44 percent were women. Within the heart attack patient group, 81 patients had asthma, 44 of those with active asthma.

After controlling for traditional heart attack risk factors such as age, obesity, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes and high cholesterol, a history of coronary heart disease, and conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, results showed that patients with inactive asthma were not at an increased risk of heart attack, but those with active asthma were at a 70 percent risk, says Young Juhn, M.D., senior author and Mayo Clinic pediatric and adolescent physician and clinical epidemiologist. [...]

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Traci Klein (@traciklein) posted · Mon, Aug 11 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Task Force Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline

A Mayo Clinic task force challenges some recommendations in the updated guideline for cholesterol treatment unveiled by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) in 2013. The task force concludes, based on current evidence, that not all patients encouraged to take cholesterol-lowering medications, such as statins, may benefit from them and that the guideline missed some important conditions that might benefit from medication.

Furthermore, the task force believes an emphasis needs to be placed on an individualized treatment approach with each patient and exercising shared decision-making.

heart stethoscopeRecommendations of the task force, made up of Mayo Clinic experts in cardiology, endocrinology and preventive medicine, with no conflicts of interest or links to the drug industry, will be published Aug. 14 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. An editorial will accompany the paper. Mayo Clinic physicians are adopting the task force’s guideline.

“The ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline was last updated in 2001, so it needed to be updated. We agree with many points of the guideline, but there are some key areas where we do not completely agree or we wanted to expand and provide more guidance,” says Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., task force chairman and director of preventive cardiology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Kullo and Dr. Lopez-Jimenez are available in the downloads, as well as animations of statins' effects in the bloodstream and carotid artery plaque formation

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