• By Laurel J. Kelly

Consumer Health: Is a health savings account right for you?

May 3, 2019
a young woman reading information on a laptop screen, looking thoughtful, serious

Health savings accounts
Health savings accounts are like personal savings accounts, but the money in them is used to pay for health care expenses. The money you deposit into the account is not taxed, and you — not your employer or insurance company — own and control the money in your account. Like any health care option, there are advantages and disadvantages, though. Learn more about health savings accounts and whether one might be right for you.

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