• By Dana Sparks

CREEPY, DREADFUL, WONDERFUL PARASITES: A Parasitologist’s View of the World – Week of March 2, 2015

March 2, 2015

macroscopic image of giardia 2C parasiteEvery week Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Read Dr. Pritt's blog: Parasite Wonders and submit your answers, comments and questions. Enjoy science!

Read more about Dr. Pritt.

Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer's. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients. 

So then to clarify, in the case where a parent were to pass away, what exactly is the procedure for obtaining any of their information, by a child who may work here at Mayo? I'm talking about any information that, for example, an insurance company would need regarding cause of death, etc…

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When you are sent the "thanks but no thanks" email after submitting an application, I've found it useful to send a polite inquiry to Human Resources (I went by the name on the email). I have had my application be immediately dismissed though I've met the qualifications and after asking about it, had it forwarded it on to the hiring manager with a note that something must have been missed. It happens. The system isn't perfect and it's always nice to learn how to improve for the next time.

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You mention that we are able to see "disposition reasons" for not progressing in a job application – can you provide information on how to do so? I'm not seeing it anywhere in the system. All I see for Application status is "No Longer Being Considered" with no explanation… Thanks!

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@tjobes17

You mention that we are able to see "disposition reasons" for not progressing in a job application – can you provide information on how to do so? I'm not seeing it anywhere in the system. All I see for Application status is "No Longer Being Considered" with no explanation… Thanks!

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Thank you for asking this, I have the same question. Is there a different link for viewing this as opposed to the 'Application Status' on the internal job application website? As mentioned already, there is no disposition reason given on there.

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There seems to be a large population from the Payson area coming down to the valley for medical care. I hope that Mayo will consider a facility up there sometime in the future. Banner already is starting to have a presence up there. I feel like this would help our patients, as well as help to keep us competitive.

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Step one of the negotiation process – inform the other party that your offer is not negotiable. Granted, I've never been brave enough when told that "Mayo doesn't negotiate wage" to respond "Great, neither do I, here is my offer." Perhaps some day….

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@gabenowicki

Step one of the negotiation process – inform the other party that your offer is not negotiable. Granted, I've never been brave enough when told that "Mayo doesn't negotiate wage" to respond "Great, neither do I, here is my offer." Perhaps some day….

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I'll be the first one transferring there when / if they open it !

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@tjobes17

You mention that we are able to see "disposition reasons" for not progressing in a job application – can you provide information on how to do so? I'm not seeing it anywhere in the system. All I see for Application status is "No Longer Being Considered" with no explanation… Thanks!

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I really enjoy being a Mayo employee, however I agree, the current system of being hired, or transferring internally is extremely frustrating and lacking in transparency. I looked for a transfer for well over a year before finally being successful, and every single time I inquired as to why I was not granted an interview, despite having years of experience, no corrective actions, etc, I was always told "well, HR can't really tell you that, the hiring manager makes that call" and then when I would ask for contact information as to who the hiring manager for a given posting was, so that I could inquire to try and get more detailed feedback for improvement, several times I was essentially told that information was confidential. I completely understand wanting to prevent harassment or whatnot of hiring managers, but it's incredibly frustrating to not even have a contact for who will be making any of the serious, position specific decisions about an application.

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“This may just be my experience, but I’ve transferred among a few hourly jobs here at Mayo Clinic. Whenever Human Resources calls to offer me a new position and wage, there is never any negotiation.” I’m curious—I’ve only ever held hourly (as opposed to salaried) positions, but I’ve had a fair number of jobs in multiple industries over the decades, and I’ve /never/ heard of negotiating wage as a thing for hourly employees in the US (as opposed to independent contractors, who might be paid hourly). Outside of Mayo, is negotiating for non-salaried employees actually a thing? A common thing? I mean, I’ve definitely both experienced and heard about someone saying “that’s not enough—how about $X/hr?” but I’ve never heard of it getting anywhere. Either you take the offered job at the offered wage, or you don’t.

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@greggmadlon

So then to clarify, in the case where a parent were to pass away, what exactly is the procedure for obtaining any of their information, by a child who may work here at Mayo? I'm talking about any information that, for example, an insurance company would need regarding cause of death, etc…

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I would think in the case you are speaking of, the Release of Information would be directly from Mayo to the Insurance company and a family member would have no need of accessing the information at that time.

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@nathanieleba

“This may just be my experience, but I’ve transferred among a few hourly jobs here at Mayo Clinic. Whenever Human Resources calls to offer me a new position and wage, there is never any negotiation.” I’m curious—I’ve only ever held hourly (as opposed to salaried) positions, but I’ve had a fair number of jobs in multiple industries over the decades, and I’ve /never/ heard of negotiating wage as a thing for hourly employees in the US (as opposed to independent contractors, who might be paid hourly). Outside of Mayo, is negotiating for non-salaried employees actually a thing? A common thing? I mean, I’ve definitely both experienced and heard about someone saying “that’s not enough—how about $X/hr?” but I’ve never heard of it getting anywhere. Either you take the offered job at the offered wage, or you don’t.

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I've experienced it once, but I'm guessing its pretty field and employer-specific. In my experience at Mayo, the tactic is not to ask HR to increase the wage they are offering you, but rather to convince the hiring manager to repost the position at a higher pay grade (assuming that you meet the minimum qualifications for that pay grade). You must keep in mind, though, this opens up the job to additional applicants/competition, so you'd better be quite sure that they really wanted to hire you and that you're going to be a better candidate than anyone else who applies.

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@greggmadlon

So then to clarify, in the case where a parent were to pass away, what exactly is the procedure for obtaining any of their information, by a child who may work here at Mayo? I'm talking about any information that, for example, an insurance company would need regarding cause of death, etc…

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After death, only the power of attorney has access to any of the patient's information.

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@nathanieleba

“This may just be my experience, but I’ve transferred among a few hourly jobs here at Mayo Clinic. Whenever Human Resources calls to offer me a new position and wage, there is never any negotiation.” I’m curious—I’ve only ever held hourly (as opposed to salaried) positions, but I’ve had a fair number of jobs in multiple industries over the decades, and I’ve /never/ heard of negotiating wage as a thing for hourly employees in the US (as opposed to independent contractors, who might be paid hourly). Outside of Mayo, is negotiating for non-salaried employees actually a thing? A common thing? I mean, I’ve definitely both experienced and heard about someone saying “that’s not enough—how about $X/hr?” but I’ve never heard of it getting anywhere. Either you take the offered job at the offered wage, or you don’t.

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FYI ~ My recent change to being salaried was not negotiable, either. It's not just hourly employees. I was told their calculator compares the experience/schooling you have with the exact responsibilities in the posting. If something is implied in the posting but not stated, it has no value in the calculator. For example, my (awesome) new job is eLearning to train employees. My salary was calculated based on eLearning experience, and my adult education experience and schooling had no value in the calculator.

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@greggmadlon

So then to clarify, in the case where a parent were to pass away, what exactly is the procedure for obtaining any of their information, by a child who may work here at Mayo? I'm talking about any information that, for example, an insurance company would need regarding cause of death, etc…

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Power of Attorney is only for during the life of the person. Once a person passes away the personal representative assigned in a will/trust has the access or the immediate next of kin.

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@greggmadlon

So then to clarify, in the case where a parent were to pass away, what exactly is the procedure for obtaining any of their information, by a child who may work here at Mayo? I'm talking about any information that, for example, an insurance company would need regarding cause of death, etc…

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So once someone dies, no one can access their medical records unless it is for research or something? I find it odd that family could not see medical records of deceased family members. Seems it would be a good way to learn more about your family history and inherited medical conditions. Why would the dead need their medical records protected anyway?

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