• By Joel Streed

Measles Virus for Cancer: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

April 9, 2015

Following recent outbreaks, we've been hearing a lot about the measles.  But in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, something you may not have heard.  How the measles virus holds potential for treating cancer.

To listen, click the link below.

Measles Virus For Cancer

I got a minor in Environmental Studies in college, so it makes me really happy and proud to see that MCF is being recognized for their commitment to environmental responsibility. I believe there is always room for improvement and have some specific ideas. I think a good way to increase our recycling on campus even more, is to place additional recycling bins around campus, if financially feasible. For example, in the Kinne Auditorium, there is only one recycling bin next to one trashcan, when there are trashcans in all four corners. I believe people would be more prone to recycle if the bin was more readily accessible because I know many people don't care to, or don't have the time to, walk across the auditorium to throw recyclable items in a separate container. Also, I am not sure if this is feasible, but I believe composting, particularly in the cafeteria kitchens, would have a significant impact in reducing our overall waste, and thus, reducing the campus' environmental footprint. I know they implemented this on my college campus while I worked at a sandwich shop on campus, and it was a huge success. Thank you Mayo Clinic Florida for your commitment and continuous effort to keeping our community and our planet clean and green!

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What about all the plastic containers and styrofoam used in the cafeteria? Is this recycled?

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@anacaputo

I got a minor in Environmental Studies in college, so it makes me really happy and proud to see that MCF is being recognized for their commitment to environmental responsibility. I believe there is always room for improvement and have some specific ideas. I think a good way to increase our recycling on campus even more, is to place additional recycling bins around campus, if financially feasible. For example, in the Kinne Auditorium, there is only one recycling bin next to one trashcan, when there are trashcans in all four corners. I believe people would be more prone to recycle if the bin was more readily accessible because I know many people don't care to, or don't have the time to, walk across the auditorium to throw recyclable items in a separate container. Also, I am not sure if this is feasible, but I believe composting, particularly in the cafeteria kitchens, would have a significant impact in reducing our overall waste, and thus, reducing the campus' environmental footprint. I know they implemented this on my college campus while I worked at a sandwich shop on campus, and it was a huge success. Thank you Mayo Clinic Florida for your commitment and continuous effort to keeping our community and our planet clean and green!

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Thank you for your suggestions. We are always looking for additional ways to increase our sustainability efforts on campus and appreciate the interest of our staff members in assisting with that. I can respond to your specific suggestions. The installation of additional recycling receptacles is driven both by cost of collection and space constraints. In order to keep down the cost of collection, the goal is to try to centralize recycling as much as possible to reduce costs. Campus Planning continuously reviews new products that have the potential to allow for more recycling participation while reducing the footprint of the receptacles. At this time, an ideal solution hasn't been identified, but evaluation of new products will continue. Regarding composting, our food service and environmental services contractors have explored composting of food waste as a way to reduce the campus waste footprint. However, at this time, they have been unsuccessful in finding anyone who is willing or able to accept the estimated quantities of compost that would be generated by the campus. Inquiries will continue in the hope that a vendor with available capacity can be identified in the future.

COMMENT

Congratulations to Dr. Farrugia and all Mayo Florida employees behind this important effort!!! Are the same or other sustainability and conservation initiatives done here in Rochester campus?

COMMENT
@lynseyseim

What about all the plastic containers and styrofoam used in the cafeteria? Is this recycled?

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I have wondered this myself. I think a sustainable initiative in the cafeteria could include greater availability of washable plates, bowls, silverware, and cups. You could even require a 25 cent surcharge on the disposable polystyrene to-go plates and plastic bags to increase awareness of these items.

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@mariana

Congratulations to Dr. Farrugia and all Mayo Florida employees behind this important effort!!! Are the same or other sustainability and conservation initiatives done here in Rochester campus?

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Hi Mariana – Yes, there are many of the same and some different sustainability efforts occurring at our Rochester campus. Four Mayo Clinic campuses, including Rochester, were recently awarded Practice Greenhealth recognition. See more at: http://newsletters.mayo.edu/newscenter/Article.aspx?contentID=DOCMAN-0000170886. Local strategies are developed per local opportunities (availability of local recycling markets, renewable energy sourcing, etc.)Successful pilots are shared and considered as best practices across Mayo Clinic. Check out more information About Mayo Clinic Green activities at: http://intranet.mayo.edu/charlie/green-initiative/ Thanks for your interest, efforts on behalf of environmental stewardship at Mayo Clinic. – Sue Fargo Prosser, Rochester Green Committee.

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

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