• By Joel Streed

Obesity and Eating Disorders in Kids: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

February 20, 2015

Obesity is big problem for many kids.  So you'd think you'd think a dramatic weight loss might be something to cheer.  But in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we find that's not always the case.

To listen, click the link below.

Obesity and Eating Disorders

The crows are God’s answer to road kill and I do agree quite a problem for those of us that are still breathing and moving about. I suggest a call go out for applications for ‘responsible’ teenagers with .22’s, Mayo and the City provide the birdshot, some supervision, and a couple of ambulances on stand-by. Obviously this would probably be best on the weekend when most teens are looking for something different to do.

COMMENT

If the crows are a "City of Rochester" issue why is Mayo spending time and money on cleaning sidewalks? Why are they netting trees? If this is purely a City of Rochester issue why is Mayo going out of their way to work on the problem yet they tell employees to "Direct questions to the City of Rochester"?

COMMENT
@derekharlow

If the crows are a "City of Rochester" issue why is Mayo spending time and money on cleaning sidewalks? Why are they netting trees? If this is purely a City of Rochester issue why is Mayo going out of their way to work on the problem yet they tell employees to "Direct questions to the City of Rochester"?

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City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic, City of Rochester, Mayo Clinic… I'm not seeing a differencing factor here.

COMMENT

The crows must be finding some food source or they wouldn't be congregating in such large numbers. Are there things Mayo Clinic is doing to make sure we are not contributing to factors that allow the crow population to remain at current levels?

COMMENT

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

COMMENT

"Mayo Clinic has netted more trees and also is trying a type of sawdust on the problem areas. The grounds crew will revisit the bus area and see about adding more netting." I applaud the efforts that are being made to help the crow problem, however, I think adding sawdust to the sidewalks is a major fail. I have avoided walking through this area since it has been implemented, as I would rather just walk through the excrement itself rather than walk through sawdust that is combined with excrement and now it's sticking to my shoes, clothes, etc. Then walking into the north employee entrance of the Gonda building, which has no carpet or rug to wipe your feet…just gross. While the sawdust may have seemed a good idea in theory, when put into practice it leaves a lot to be desired.

COMMENT

I heard that Mayo/City of Rochester used to pay for a company to put reflective strips in the trees to help keep the crows away. Was that not working anymore? I do agree that the crow and the crow poop issue is a problem here.

COMMENT

I agree with the comment regarding the parking ramp passes in Eau Claire. Many long term employees feel frustrated by the lack of access to the ramp. I think the process of issuing passes needs to be revamped. Many employees who have parking passes may have change their status to part time, or changed jobs or shifts and work at another location, yet they hold passes and rarely use them. Please explain the other items considered, other than date of hire, when giving new passes, or collecting old ones. Thank you.

COMMENT
@shandellsettersten

I agree with the comment regarding the parking ramp passes in Eau Claire. Many long term employees feel frustrated by the lack of access to the ramp. I think the process of issuing passes needs to be revamped. Many employees who have parking passes may have change their status to part time, or changed jobs or shifts and work at another location, yet they hold passes and rarely use them. Please explain the other items considered, other than date of hire, when giving new passes, or collecting old ones. Thank you.

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Welcome to the club that all of us in Rochester are perpetually in. Parking here is such that I believe "downtown" parking is at minimum a 14 year wait, and that just lets you park on campus, you might still be 4-6 blocks from your actual work unit, and the St Marys campus I think is over 20 for on site parking.

COMMENT

In answer to the question as to a laminated PTO listing, I think your supervisor could come up with a pocket type of list that could be laminated through the print shop so staff would have a listing they could refer to as well. I am not sure if it is available to all areas though but it is a thought.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Mr. Staver, Thank you very much for your input here. Besides the measures attempted, maybe an idea would be to get rid of the trees and have beautiful landscaping, like that on the west side of the Gonda building.

COMMENT
@alysa

I heard that Mayo/City of Rochester used to pay for a company to put reflective strips in the trees to help keep the crows away. Was that not working anymore? I do agree that the crow and the crow poop issue is a problem here.

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Because stuff like that works for about 5 minutes until one crow figures out it's not really dangerous and tells a few friends and they tell a few friends and they tell a few friends… Crows are wicked smart.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Glad to hear we are still working on this problem. Keep at it and hopefully we will see a difference. I know the crows are a bother but they have to live too…Wildlife has been coming downtown Rochester for many years. thank you to all who are trying to control them.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Thank you Randy, it seems you have stated that humans have affected the environment enough to entice the birds. It is warmer in Rochester and it is not due to the nature it might be due to cement etc. If I were them I would be here too. yes when I drive in it is also warmer in the city than the countryside. Thanks for helping understand that we humans do have an effect on the environment.

COMMENT

Idle question- what's the purpose for holding found change for three months?

COMMENT
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