• By Joel Streed

Obesity and Eating Disorders in Kids: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

February 20, 2015

Obesity is big problem for many kids.  So you'd think you'd think a dramatic weight loss might be something to cheer.  But in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we find that's not always the case.

To listen, click the link below.

Obesity and Eating Disorders

I like the crows.

COMMENT
@kathleengraham1

I don't feel like humans have anymore right to be here than the crows do. You can't consume the environment and expect to not share it. The majority of the views here are quite anthropocentric, I feel people need to realize they're not the only things in existence here.

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No, I don't. I ride the bus. I do own a car, which is sometimes pooped on. When this occurs I'm not offended. It washes off, no animals harmed. I do step on the bird droppings, I suppose, when exiting the bus. I've never noticed, I feel like I wear shoes to protect me from getting things like droppings on my feet.

COMMENT
@kathleengraham1

I don't feel like humans have anymore right to be here than the crows do. You can't consume the environment and expect to not share it. The majority of the views here are quite anthropocentric, I feel people need to realize they're not the only things in existence here.

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Saying they're pests is subjective. They're also native, non-invasive. My logic implies that you should be more willing to accept a more symbiotic relationship with other creatures. You cannot dispose of everything that makes you unhappy. You twisted my logic, I think you have a right to protect yourself individually from things that could actually harm you. Crows are not one of them. You feel crows are a menace, others agree with you. They're not actually doing anything other than annoying people. If you feel like they're threatening the ecosystem, that's another matter…but I've only seen people stating their personal annoyances so far. If you don't enjoy wildlife, use the subway and skyway.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Because in July there will be a Q&A asking why isn't there shade provided for the Hilton parking lot.

COMMENT
@shandellsettersten

I agree with the comment regarding the parking ramp passes in Eau Claire. Many long term employees feel frustrated by the lack of access to the ramp. I think the process of issuing passes needs to be revamped. Many employees who have parking passes may have change their status to part time, or changed jobs or shifts and work at another location, yet they hold passes and rarely use them. Please explain the other items considered, other than date of hire, when giving new passes, or collecting old ones. Thank you.

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I wonder how many of us will have parking at all once DMC comes in. I worry that we are all going to be shuttled in from somewhere outside.

COMMENT
@sonjafle

Why is everyone so concerned with what people are wearing? It seems like it's getting pretty nit-picky….

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Likewise with the super short skirts being allowed, but not ankle length pants. Talk about ridiculous.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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While protected, Minnesota DNR does allow taking nuisance crows out of season and without license (http://dnr.state.mn.us/livingwith_wildlife/crows/lethal.html).

COMMENT

While I can understand the nuisance of the crows and their subsequent messes, there seems to be something missing from the comments. These are animals, that are under protection and yet some want to just eradicate the problem. Like any wildlife we have displaced due to development, you have to learn to live with them and understand they have the right to live just as you do. I find it appalling that a clean car has more value than these some called "winged demons". There are far larger problems in our world than a little crow poo. When did we get to the point that just destroying the object of our problem was the solution.

COMMENT
@sonjafle

Why is everyone so concerned with what people are wearing? It seems like it's getting pretty nit-picky….

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Agreed. Let supervisors worry about unit dress code. If they see you and choose to say that it is acceptable, then let it go. The only solution to this problem short term (since it is apparently such a big issue) is to all wear the same outfit (shoes, dress, accessories, etc.) I don't see that happening. Bigger fish to fry in my opinion.

COMMENT
@gregoryschuweiler

The crows are God’s answer to road kill and I do agree quite a problem for those of us that are still breathing and moving about. I suggest a call go out for applications for ‘responsible’ teenagers with .22’s, Mayo and the City provide the birdshot, some supervision, and a couple of ambulances on stand-by. Obviously this would probably be best on the weekend when most teens are looking for something different to do.

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My dachshund hates crows. If she hears one outside she barks to go out. Then stands on the ground and looks up and barks at them.I have a slingshot if they get annoying. I use small rocks.

COMMENT
@bterrill

The crows must be finding some food source or they wouldn't be congregating in such large numbers. Are there things Mayo Clinic is doing to make sure we are not contributing to factors that allow the crow population to remain at current levels?

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Reasons crows like to be in town: 1: It's noticeably warmer, due to all the concrete and buildings. In some cases, they also provide wind blocks. 2: Between garbage and roadkill, there's more to eat. (I've heard they move to the garbage dump when that's not frozen.) 3: It's well-lit. Crows can't see well in the dark. Owls, which like to eat crows, can see well in the dark. So, yeah, it's environmental. If we were willing to eliminate streetlights and paved roads and heated buildings, the crows would go away. Short of that, likely the best we'll do is decrease their numbers a bit. It's not at all unique to Rochester–crow populations are increasing in urban areas across the country.

COMMENT
@kathleengraham1

I don't feel like humans have anymore right to be here than the crows do. You can't consume the environment and expect to not share it. The majority of the views here are quite anthropocentric, I feel people need to realize they're not the only things in existence here.

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The problem, however, is that these droppings are on the bottoms of our shoes. While our shoes protect our feet from the droppings, it doesn't stop us from tracking that waste into our buildings where we are treating some very sick patients. Not to mention tracking it into our cafeterias where food is served. This isn't a dropping here or there, the sidewalks are covered and there is no way to avoid it….not to mention saying a silent prayer as you walk to and from buildings that you don't get pooped on while listening to the spats all around you.

COMMENT
@stephanieasa

While I can understand the nuisance of the crows and their subsequent messes, there seems to be something missing from the comments. These are animals, that are under protection and yet some want to just eradicate the problem. Like any wildlife we have displaced due to development, you have to learn to live with them and understand they have the right to live just as you do. I find it appalling that a clean car has more value than these some called "winged demons". There are far larger problems in our world than a little crow poo. When did we get to the point that just destroying the object of our problem was the solution.

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The problem isn't the crows, per se. It's the massive number of crows. And even that wouldn't be a problem if their droppings weren't so voluminous and, frankly, gross.

COMMENT
@kathleengraham1

I don't feel like humans have anymore right to be here than the crows do. You can't consume the environment and expect to not share it. The majority of the views here are quite anthropocentric, I feel people need to realize they're not the only things in existence here.

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Kathleen Graham, do you wear your shoes into your house when you get home? Bird poop you walk through then gets into your home. Ick.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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From the DNR Hunting Regulations handbook: "Crows may be taken without a license in season or at any time when they are doing or are about to do damage." If a person was to walk down one of the crow [dropping] covered sidewalks and then go visit a local swine raising operation, the good ones wouldn't let you in the place without first using an antibacterial footbath, might even make you change. A poultry operation probably wouldn't want you to step out of your car. Yet every day, here at the world famous Mayo Clinic, people walk right through it and into patient care facilities. I guess I just don't understand. The solution is simple. The courage to do it is absent.

COMMENT
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