• By Joel Streed

Obesity and Eating Disorders in Kids: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

February 20, 2015

Obesity is big problem for many kids.  So you'd think you'd think a dramatic weight loss might be something to cheer.  But in this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we find that's not always the case.

To listen, click the link below.

Obesity and Eating Disorders

@gregoryschuweiler

The crows are God’s answer to road kill and I do agree quite a problem for those of us that are still breathing and moving about. I suggest a call go out for applications for ‘responsible’ teenagers with .22’s, Mayo and the City provide the birdshot, some supervision, and a couple of ambulances on stand-by. Obviously this would probably be best on the weekend when most teens are looking for something different to do.

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I love your suggestion!!!

COMMENT

I agree, remove the offending trees! Replace them with massive hanging plants. It would add a beautiful green space option. Plus, no risk of tree roots buckling the sidewalks! Seems more cost effective in the long run.

COMMENT
@kathleengraham1

I don't feel like humans have anymore right to be here than the crows do. You can't consume the environment and expect to not share it. The majority of the views here are quite anthropocentric, I feel people need to realize they're not the only things in existence here.

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"Sometimes pooped on." Try 12 droppings on m car in one night, not to mention entire flocks charging at you. And walking through the sky ways/subway isn't possible when going out to your car at 2:00 am.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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There isn't much shade provided by them to begin with.

COMMENT
@stephanieasa

While I can understand the nuisance of the crows and their subsequent messes, there seems to be something missing from the comments. These are animals, that are under protection and yet some want to just eradicate the problem. Like any wildlife we have displaced due to development, you have to learn to live with them and understand they have the right to live just as you do. I find it appalling that a clean car has more value than these some called "winged demons". There are far larger problems in our world than a little crow poo. When did we get to the point that just destroying the object of our problem was the solution.

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@Stephanie – Working at St. Mary's, you, apparently, do not deal with this issue on a daily basis. It's not a little of anything – it's hoards of birds and bacteria-laden feces everywhere. I've had 12 droppings on my car in one night – w

COMMENT

"Crows do have one endearing characteristic that is apparently not shared by other birds. They will get to know people as individuals. While you can get chickadees to eat out of your hand, any old hand will do, and I suspect that the chickadees do not know you as an individual. Crows will! If you toss them peanuts (I recommend unsalted, in the shell) on a regular basis, they will wait and watch for you. Not just any person, but you. If you do this often enough, they will follow you down the street to get more. I have made a point of getting on the good side of a number of crow families around Ithaca. Some will follow my car down the street, and if I don't notice them and toss them peanuts they will dash across the windshield to let me know they are there. Some of these crows recognize me far from their home territories, way out of context. (It did, however, take some of them a long time to learn to recognize my new car.) So indulge yourself and makes some personal friends with the crows. That is the preferred relationship, because they also are happy to turn this talent of recognition to the darker side, and treat you as an enemy. (Again, not just all people, but you.) Because I climb to crow nests to band young birds, many crows in Ithaca know me and hate me. Whenever they notice me in their territory they will come over and yell at me. They will follow me around and keep yelling for as long as I am there. Believe me, it's better to be on their good side than their bad side!" http://www.birds.cornell.edu/crows/crowfaq.htm#attack

COMMENT
@shandellsettersten

I agree with the comment regarding the parking ramp passes in Eau Claire. Many long term employees feel frustrated by the lack of access to the ramp. I think the process of issuing passes needs to be revamped. Many employees who have parking passes may have change their status to part time, or changed jobs or shifts and work at another location, yet they hold passes and rarely use them. Please explain the other items considered, other than date of hire, when giving new passes, or collecting old ones. Thank you.

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I wonder about that too. With DMC coming in, I have no way of knowing if there will even be downtown parking by the time I am granted downtown parking privileges.

COMMENT
@gregoryschuweiler

The crows are God’s answer to road kill and I do agree quite a problem for those of us that are still breathing and moving about. I suggest a call go out for applications for ‘responsible’ teenagers with .22’s, Mayo and the City provide the birdshot, some supervision, and a couple of ambulances on stand-by. Obviously this would probably be best on the weekend when most teens are looking for something different to do.

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Why can we not simply relocate the trees to another location? Do we really need to resort to killing animals?

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Because apparently Mayo employees like to kill animals, so they would rather go out and shoot them.

COMMENT
@stephanieasa

While I can understand the nuisance of the crows and their subsequent messes, there seems to be something missing from the comments. These are animals, that are under protection and yet some want to just eradicate the problem. Like any wildlife we have displaced due to development, you have to learn to live with them and understand they have the right to live just as you do. I find it appalling that a clean car has more value than these some called "winged demons". There are far larger problems in our world than a little crow poo. When did we get to the point that just destroying the object of our problem was the solution.

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While I don't experience this at work because I park in a cover lot, the crows have been pushed in my neighborhood so yes I can relate. In fact, a murder of crows lives in the tree in my front yard so my sidewalk often is covered and they pecking around in the yard. My car as well shows the signs of violation from the crows but I deal with it as I would any other winged creature that just so happened to relieve itself on my vehicle. I certainly don't take it personally and don't feel that they must be destroyed because of it.

COMMENT
@randyrst

Full disclosure, I am a Mayo employee but also in a unique position as a representative for the City of Rochester. I thought I would add some comments to help explain the crow situation. The city has been working on this issue for several years now based on guidance from experts from DNR and Fish & Wildlife departments. Controlling or eliminating the crows is challenging for several reasons. 1 – Crows tend to come into the city during the evening simply because it is warmer and well lighted. This is purely a natural response as the birds seek shelter and protection from predators. Also, they are able to obtain food if garbage containers and other sources are available. 2 – Crows are considered a protected species meaning measures like hunting are very controlled. I know that there are some hunters that take advantage of the two hunting seasons but obviously it can be challenging to make a dent in the numbers. 3 – The city, in partnership with Mayo Clinic, has been working to control the issue with other, non-lethal, measures inside the city limits. Keep in mind that crows are considered a very intelligent creature. It has been documented that the crows will recognize the flashing lights of the 'crow patrol' vehicles, fly away, and then return after the vehicles pass. This is why we tend to use a variety of measures to harass the crows to keep them confused. These include laser lights, sound (fireworks), and recorded sounds like predator calls or distress calls. 4 – We were informed by the biological experts that this will take a period of several years to break the cycle. Mature birds will return along with their young so it will take multiple seasons to train the birds. 5 – Lastly, we are trying to manage the situation at a reasonable cost to taxpayers. The staff you see in the evening are those that are on duty anyway to perform tasks like snowplowing. The additional task of managing the crows provides a way to keep staff more efficient. While the birds clearly create a problem, we are trying to work with the knowledge and tools we have available to manage the situation. The city has been very appreciative of Mayo's help in managing the issue. As stated in the original answer, other comments and ideas may be directed to the city Park and Recreation department.

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Consider too that as it gets on our shoes (even if not visible) we are tracking it into the hospital/office/workplace and into our home and exposed to children and pets. Also, there is nothing like getting off the bus in front of Harwick on 2nd street and hearing the plopping around you in the morning and praying you won't get hit. Several people I know have had direct hits. It is disgusting all around.

COMMENT
@christineschultz

I think the way parking permits are issued in the Eau Claire Ramp right now is fair. Using your date of hire is a very good idea.

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It would be nice if they went by years of service, like Rochester. In the current model, employees with 13 years of service still are not allotted a spot! This requirement has been there since the ramp opened in 2009(?). It would be nice for more transparency on the issue and maybe that would ease many of the tensions about this matter. It would be nice to know if the allotment is based on number of employees in the area that meet the year requirement or the number of applicants for a spot that meet the requirements.

COMMENT
@shandellsettersten

I agree with the comment regarding the parking ramp passes in Eau Claire. Many long term employees feel frustrated by the lack of access to the ramp. I think the process of issuing passes needs to be revamped. Many employees who have parking passes may have change their status to part time, or changed jobs or shifts and work at another location, yet they hold passes and rarely use them. Please explain the other items considered, other than date of hire, when giving new passes, or collecting old ones. Thank you.

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@ Sheryl, Employees with 13yrs of service in EC still are not allotted ramp parking privileges. If you did not work here before 2002, you are not allowed to park in the ramp. Regardless of years of service. We also do not have shuttle service. If it went

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@ambergray

I like the crows.

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I like the crows too. And the trees. The world would be a poorer place with only pavement and people downtown. People are pretty messy too. And most of them are smarter than the crows.

COMMENT
@michelleschreiber

I agree, remove the offending trees! Replace them with massive hanging plants. It would add a beautiful green space option. Plus, no risk of tree roots buckling the sidewalks! Seems more cost effective in the long run.

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Remove the trees?? I hope you're kidding.

COMMENT
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