• By Joel Streed

RA and Shoulder Replacement: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

June 15, 2015

Shoulder pain due to rheumatoid arthritis can be debilitating.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we hear from Dr. John Sperling about options for treatment.

To listen, click the link below.

RA and Shoulder Replacement

This is great news – that our growth strategy has been successful. I'd like to know more about if we predict that our growth strategy is having an impact on reducing racial health disparities, since Minnesota ranks as one of the top 2-3 states for the worst racial health disparaties. We know that in Minnesota, there are several groups that have very low rates of colorectal cancer screening. We also know that African Americans have large health disparaties in areas that fall under cardiovascular disease. We also know that two groups of people, African Americans and Hispanics are amongst the groups of commercially insured people whose numbers are growing quickly. Is our marketing plan helping to draw the patients in who need our help and who will help grow our business?

What about parking and traffic congestion for all these "additional far-reaching benefits for Mayo patients and staff under the new Competitive Growth Strategy."? We are already stacked, packed and racked, busting to the seams with our current streets and parking lots?

In 2015, Mayo Clinic launched the Competitive Market Plan, an initiative that focused on growing five practice service lines: neurosciences, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, transplant, and executive/development/international medicine. "The plan was successful as indicated by an increase in the number of new patients served, the addition of 45 new consultants to the practice along with allied health staff, and strong financial performance." May I express my concern when the definition of "success" at Mayo Clinic does not include any measure of quality of outcome, patient satisfaction or whether the needs of the patients that caused them to come to us were met? Have we truly lost our focus to the point that success is measured by how well we did and not how well our patients did? If that is true, as my friend Joe Kenda would say; my,my,my.

@kindraa

This is great news – that our growth strategy has been successful. I'd like to know more about if we predict that our growth strategy is having an impact on reducing racial health disparities, since Minnesota ranks as one of the top 2-3 states for the worst racial health disparaties. We know that in Minnesota, there are several groups that have very low rates of colorectal cancer screening. We also know that African Americans have large health disparaties in areas that fall under cardiovascular disease. We also know that two groups of people, African Americans and Hispanics are amongst the groups of commercially insured people whose numbers are growing quickly. Is our marketing plan helping to draw the patients in who need our help and who will help grow our business?

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On behalf of Tommy Hillman, Marketing Manager Targeting growth within multicultural patient communities is definitely a significant part of the strategic marketing plan, and we recognize that this is vital to the future success of Mayo Clinic. We also recognize that one of the keys to connecting with multicultural patients is demonstrating our knowledge of specific medical conditions that may disproportionately impact certain communities. Mayo Clinic has dedicated resources towards the goal of reaching a broader segment of the population, and we strive to expand on our message that Mayo Clinic is a destination medical center for all people.

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

@johngraves

In 2015, Mayo Clinic launched the Competitive Market Plan, an initiative that focused on growing five practice service lines: neurosciences, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, transplant, and executive/development/international medicine. "The plan was successful as indicated by an increase in the number of new patients served, the addition of 45 new consultants to the practice along with allied health staff, and strong financial performance." May I express my concern when the definition of "success" at Mayo Clinic does not include any measure of quality of outcome, patient satisfaction or whether the needs of the patients that caused them to come to us were met? Have we truly lost our focus to the point that success is measured by how well we did and not how well our patients did? If that is true, as my friend Joe Kenda would say; my,my,my.

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On behalf of Ann Schauer, Practice Communications Thanks for the comment John. Mayo Clinic’s target is to be in the top decile of all quality measures and we’re happy to share that Mayo continues to meet and/or exceed this goal. Mayo earns top rankings in U.S. News & World Report, five-star rankings in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Quality Rating System, and the Bernard A. Birnbaum, M.D., Quality Leadership Award. These rankings are based on factors such as mortality, patient safety, nurse staffing, Magnet status, patient services, technology and reputation with other specialists. These rankings also represent a few ways patients and Mayo Clinic measure our performance as part of our long-standing commitment to be the best for our patients every day.

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

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