• By Jen O'Hara

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

May 21, 2015

woman breast feeding, nursing baby

Breast-feeding nutrition: Tips for moms

Coping with stress: Workplace tips

Nervous breakdown: What does it mean?

Nutrition-wise: Seniors — Beef it up to prevent muscle loss

Does soy affect breast cancer risk?

I understand how this can be an issue but you need to be added to a person's friend list before you can see it so combating it might be on the difficult side. I believe it's common sense not to put stuff on it that has a patient involved. But if A sends to B, C can't see it unless I sent it to them. If B looked at it, it will close in 5 seconds and be gone forever unless like was stated it was screenshotted and it would tell you if they did that aswell. So I guess I have no idea how they will monitor it.

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I cannot believe this is an issue that needed to be addressed. The Internet Is Forever. Just because it disappears from the feed or storyline does not mean it no longer exist, It Does. SnapChat still has it in their database. A disgruntled employee can still access it and spread it around. My brain tells me a social media platform is no place for a discussion on a patient care; identifiable or not. Has common sense been replaced by social media?

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It's worse that our very own kiosks implemented with Epic take photos of patients with other patients/employees in the background.

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@mskdgary

I cannot believe this is an issue that needed to be addressed. The Internet Is Forever. Just because it disappears from the feed or storyline does not mean it no longer exist, It Does. SnapChat still has it in their database. A disgruntled employee can still access it and spread it around. My brain tells me a social media platform is no place for a discussion on a patient care; identifiable or not. Has common sense been replaced by social media?

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Social media is still a new "thing". The recent issues with Facebook data being used by other entities without account holders' consent shows us that we all are still learning.

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With any social media or Internet service you have to just assume it's not going to be private, that's just the price you pay for "free" services. Nothing is really free when it comes to Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and etc. I just always assume my data can be used for marketing (or anything else) and assume the data is not safe and secure. Even with services like Google drive, you have to assume that information can be accessed without your knowledge. I use Google drive heavily for personal use and even pay for a larger drive, but I don't store any of my personal data on there that may be considered confidential (tax return info for example) as I know that data could be compromised, and just because I pay a small fee a month it doesn't mean I'm free of all advertisements based on what I store there. I keep all confidential data on my home network devices.

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@daniellek23

It's worse that our very own kiosks implemented with Epic take photos of patients with other patients/employees in the background.

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Will patient photos be reviewed and have random background things "blurred" as appropriate? Is there a program that will capture just the patient's face and erase the rest of the image? There's an app for everything else!

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I guess my question is what are they doing on snap chat at work anyway, I feel the technology of todays world has gone crazy. limit your phone and other uses to your breaks in the day.

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@daniellek23

It's worse that our very own kiosks implemented with Epic take photos of patients with other patients/employees in the background.

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this is an excellent point that i have often wondered as well.

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I am always worried, myself using SnapChat, Facebook or Instagram because you never know if someone in the background is or was a patient that you have come in contact with. If you must use any of these, do make sure you view your picture thoroughly.

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@maxfenske

I understand how this can be an issue but you need to be added to a person's friend list before you can see it so combating it might be on the difficult side. I believe it's common sense not to put stuff on it that has a patient involved. But if A sends to B, C can't see it unless I sent it to them. If B looked at it, it will close in 5 seconds and be gone forever unless like was stated it was screenshotted and it would tell you if they did that aswell. So I guess I have no idea how they will monitor it.

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I get that completely.This shouldn't even need to be addressed the privacy of patients & shouldn't need teaching. Someone taking pictures of patients should be terminated as it's common knowledge of what not to do.

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@shaunlkr

With any social media or Internet service you have to just assume it's not going to be private, that's just the price you pay for "free" services. Nothing is really free when it comes to Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and etc. I just always assume my data can be used for marketing (or anything else) and assume the data is not safe and secure. Even with services like Google drive, you have to assume that information can be accessed without your knowledge. I use Google drive heavily for personal use and even pay for a larger drive, but I don't store any of my personal data on there that may be considered confidential (tax return info for example) as I know that data could be compromised, and just because I pay a small fee a month it doesn't mean I'm free of all advertisements based on what I store there. I keep all confidential data on my home network devices.

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Yep, I only use google drive for personal use. I was just speaking in general.

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I just can't understand why anyone would think it is ok to take a picture of someone without their knowledge or permission in the first place. It is disturbing to think that anyone would think this ok, much less to take that photo and publish it or send it to someone else. Social Media could be a great thing if people were not using it to tear people down and invade their privacy every chance they get. We at Mayo clinic should be much more professional than that!

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@maxfenske

I understand how this can be an issue but you need to be added to a person's friend list before you can see it so combating it might be on the difficult side. I believe it's common sense not to put stuff on it that has a patient involved. But if A sends to B, C can't see it unless I sent it to them. If B looked at it, it will close in 5 seconds and be gone forever unless like was stated it was screenshotted and it would tell you if they did that aswell. So I guess I have no idea how they will monitor it.

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Hi, Max- you are correct, this is difficult to monitor. Fortunately, Friend B is often diligent enough to recognize the breach of confidentiality and will take a screen shot of the image. Friend B can report the breach to the Compliance Hotline even if she is not a Mayo Clinic employee, and the Privacy Office will coordinate with HR to investigate Employee A. Friend C can also view it, screen shot it, and report it if it’s posted as a “story." Mayo Clinic employees have received corrective action, including termination, for breaches involving Snapchat. Most importantly, it is very difficult to explain to our patients how this type of social media breach could possibly happen at Mayo Clinic. Thank you for your comment, April Carlson ~ Privacy Office

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

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@mskdgary

I cannot believe this is an issue that needed to be addressed. The Internet Is Forever. Just because it disappears from the feed or storyline does not mean it no longer exist, It Does. SnapChat still has it in their database. A disgruntled employee can still access it and spread it around. My brain tells me a social media platform is no place for a discussion on a patient care; identifiable or not. Has common sense been replaced by social media?

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Katrina— We couldn’t have said it better. The internet is forever and we encourage all staff to take the same stance as you when sharing information on Snapchat. If you have not done so already, we encourage you to sign up as a Privacy Champion on our intranet site (http://intranet.mayo.edu/charlie/integrity-compliance-program/privacy/privacy-champion-program/). -Krista, Privacy Office

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

COMMENT
@shaunlkr

With any social media or Internet service you have to just assume it's not going to be private, that's just the price you pay for "free" services. Nothing is really free when it comes to Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram, and etc. I just always assume my data can be used for marketing (or anything else) and assume the data is not safe and secure. Even with services like Google drive, you have to assume that information can be accessed without your knowledge. I use Google drive heavily for personal use and even pay for a larger drive, but I don't store any of my personal data on there that may be considered confidential (tax return info for example) as I know that data could be compromised, and just because I pay a small fee a month it doesn't mean I'm free of all advertisements based on what I store there. I keep all confidential data on my home network devices.

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Thank you, Shaun. Mayo Clinic does have a policy that applies to use of public cloud storage such as Google Drive and Dropbox: http://mayocontent.mayo.edu/infosecurity/DOCMAN-0000168414. ~ April, Privacy Office

** Comment posted by subject matter expert **

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