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Tue, Mar 12 9:00am · Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine once again in top 10 U.S. News & World Report 'Best Medical School' rankings

Students at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine have access to the newest technologies and cutting-edge techniques to learn the best patient-centered care.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — U.S. News & World Report released its 2020 “Best Graduate Schools” rankings on Tuesday, March 12. Featured in the “Top 10 Best Medical Schools” once again is Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine.

The school is ranked No. 9 in the national rankings, coming in at a three-way tie with Cornell University and New York University medical schools. This is a slight dip from last year when Mayo Clinic’s school was ranked No. 6. However, changes in the 2020 methodology affected the scores for many medical schools. Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine’s score was only four points away from the No. 4 school, showcasing the competitive and complex nature of the scoring system.

Fredric Meyer, M.D., Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic, says these rankings can be a bit of a roller coaster and notes that school leaders anticipated a possible minor drop in rankings when they became aware that U.S. News & World Report once again was changing its ranking methodologies. Dr. Meyer is also dean of Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine.

“To be included as one of the top schools in the country is a real testament to the tremendous educational efforts of our faculty, students and staff,” says Dr. Meyer. “It also recognizes the strong bonds between practice, research and education at Mayo Clinic and how we work together to develop the workforce of the future.”

Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine received a $200 million gift in November 2018 from Jay Alix, a grateful patient, philanthropist and successful business consultant. This gift, the largest donation in Mayo Clinic history, will support innovative curricular solutions, including accelerated learning program tracks, dual degree programs, new programs in transformative sciences, and pioneering approaches to teaching with advanced technologies. And in keeping with Mayo Clinic’s commitment to increasing access to the medical profession for prospective highly-qualified candidates regardless of their economic backgrounds, the gift also will support scholarships.

In honor of the benefactor, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine changed its name to Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine. The U.S. News & World Report No. 9 ranking in 2020 “Best Medical Schools” gives further credence to Mr. Alix’s support of Mayo Clinic and its long history of educating future physicians imbued with Mayo’s patient-centered values.

The school has ranked high in research for several years, and many physician-scientists can attest to the groundbreaking biomedical advances being made in Mayo Clinic labs at each Mayo site. Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine students participate in research and hands-on scientific training experiences during their tenure at Mayo as an integral part of their curriculum. More than 80 percent of Mayo’s M.D. students graduate with a research manuscript published in a peer-reviewed journal. This is more than twice the national average. It’s part of the culture at Mayo Clinic — one that encourages students to collaborate with senior researchers and staff to gain insight and experience, so they continue on their quest for knowledge and biomedical discoveries long into their medical careers.

Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine began in 1972 on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. The school continues to grow with the opening of a second campus in Arizona and an inaugural class of 50 students in 2017. The school expanded again in 2018 — this time to Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus. This latest national expansion enables students to train the first two years in Arizona or Rochester, with an additional option of completing the final two years in Florida. As a national medical school with three campuses, Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine enables students to train at No. 1 hospitals in the country under a shared medical curriculum and shared Mayo values.

Dr. Meyer notes that students often consider “Best Medical School” rankings in their deliberations about where to apply and attend medical school. He describes that, from a school perspective, the rankings are seen as one of several indicators used to evaluate the stature of the medical education program. Others include student recruitment, involvement in research, success matching to residency programs and above-average achievement on national clinical knowledge exams.

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About Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine
Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine is a national medical school with four-year medical degree programs in Rochester and Arizona. The school also offers a two-plus-two program option, enabling students to complete their first two years of medical studies in Arizona or Minnesota, and their final two years of learning in Florida. For more information, visit Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, comprehensive care to everyone who needs healing. Learn more about Mayo ClinicVisit the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Media contact:

Mar 20, 2018 · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine ascends to No. 6 in U.S. News & World Report rankings

researcher and medical student viewing lab samples

ROCHESTER, Minn. — When Fredric Meyer, M.D., became executive dean of education, Mayo Clinic and dean of its medical school in 2016, he says he had a goal in mind. He wanted to see Mayo Clinic School of Medicine become one of the top 10 in the country.

Today, as U.S. News & World Report rolls out its 2019 Best Graduate Schools report, which includes best medical school scores, that goal will become a reality. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has risen to No. 6 in medical education research rankings, garnering the school one of the top spots for best medical schools in the nation.

“We are pleased the 2019 U.S. News & World Report ranking positively reflects the tremendous research and education efforts underway across Mayo Clinic,” says Dr. Meyer, the Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education.

He notes part of the rise for the school is due to changes U.S. News & World Report made to its reporting methodology, adding four new ranking factors to fully capture the funding of research conducted within academic organizations and adjusting reputation factors that could possibly favor larger universities. The other part Dr. Meyer notes has to do with continuous hard work on the part of administration, faculty, students and staff within the school and Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science to continuously enhance reporting processes and transform the educational experience at Mayo.

The school’s high ranking in research might not come as a surprise to some. Dr. Meyer explains that research and the quest for new knowledge are integral components of Mayo Clinic’s culture. Most Mayo faculty members are physician-scientists actively involved in clinical practice and biomedical or translational research, which often gives students insight into the latest advances in scientific discovery, translation and application to address unmet patient needs. Research training and scholarly activity are integrated into the school’s curriculum, resulting in Mayo’s medical students publishing their findings in peer-reviewed journals at more than twice the national average of their student counterparts.

“Clinical practice, research and education are intertwined throughout our organization, making us known for discovery and the ability to translate that into compassionate patient care. That’s the training and culture we pass on to our medical students – providing the best care and finding answers for patients where none have been provided before.”

While often referenced in medical education circles as a “hidden gem,” Mayo Clinic School of Medicine continues to grow in size and reputation. The original school, which began in 1972, sits nestled on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus, which is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 1 hospital in the country. Students learn from faculty who are some of the top medical experts in their fields.

In 2017, the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine expanded to a national medical school and added a new four-year campus in Arizona. This addition enabled students there to train at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Arizona, which is ranked the No. 1 hospital in Arizona by U.S. News & World Report. The school recently also started a new program on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus that enables third- and fourth-year medical students from other Mayo campuses to complete their last years of training at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, which is ranked the No. 1 hospital in Florida by U.S. News & World Report. As a national medical school with a shared curriculum, students can perform clinical rotations and research with Mayo experts at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

Dr. Meyer notes that, while the U.S. News & World Report rankings are one benchmark used by academic medicine and prospective students, he hopes the true measure of success for any medical school is knowing the students who graduate not only have the best knowledge and skills to be successful physicians and physician-scientists, but also have the compassionate hearts and inquisitive minds to change patient lives and innovate health care for generations to come.

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About Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Mayo Clinic School of Medicine is a national medical school with a four-year medical degree program in Rochester and a four-year program that opened on Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus in July 2017. The school also offers a two-plus-two program, enabling students to complete their first two years of medical studies in Arizona or Minnesota, and their final two years of learning in Florida. For more information, visit Mayo Clinic School of Medicine.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, comprehensive care to everyone who needs healing. Learn more about Mayo ClinicVisit the Mayo Clinic News Network.

Media contact:

Feb 22, 2018 · Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences receives NIH grant renewal to train students underrepresented in science

Diverse group of medical students looking at exhibitROCHESTER, Minn. — For more than 25 years, Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, which provides Ph.D. degree biomedical research training, has been on a mission to change the face of research to include more scientists from backgrounds underrepresented in science. The school just received renewal of a five-year ($2.2M) National Institutes of Health (NIH) federal grant to continue those efforts.

“We are extremely proud of our 26-year collaboration with NIH, and our collective long-term commitment toward ensuring America’s future biomedical research workforce reflects the rich diversity of our nation,” says Jim Maher, Ph.D., principal investigator of the grant. He notes that the renewed grant is one of three major NIH grants that are combined with funding from Mayo Clinic to support the school’s diversity mission. Dr. Maher is dean of Mayo Clinic’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and the Bernard Pollack Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science.

According to the National Science Foundation, these groups are underrepresented in science:

  • Women
  • People with disabilities
  • African-Americans
  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • American Indians or Alaska Natives

Yet according to Census Bureau projections, the U.S. is projected to become more racially and ethnically diverse, with more than half of all Americans projected to belong to a minority group by 2044.

Dr. Maher says bringing together scientists and research trainees from many different backgrounds creates robust learning environments and innovative research fueled by many unique perspectives and life experiences. The mélange of diverse researchers and physician-scientists working side by side to transform scientific discoveries into breakthrough therapies and critical advances for unmet patient needs also better represents the patient populations who could benefit from their discoveries.

Yet traditionally, women, people with disabilities and many minority students have encountered less access to or encouragement to take science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses in high school and college. They also may have encountered fewer undergraduate research opportunities, making the transition to graduate-level research training and long-term careers in biomedical sciences more difficult.

Mayo’s Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences uses the renewed NIH grant to give these students a better chance at success through a transformative program called the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development. Initiative participants are selected from the student body of nearly 200 pre-Ph.D. and pre-M.D.-Ph.D. students at the Mayo school’s campuses in Arizona, Florida and Rochester.

The Initiative for Maximizing Student Development program provides a two-year fellowship at the outset of a student’s Ph.D. training, focusing on professional development, communication skills, lab studies and personalized research mentorship and counseling. The program has proven to be successful, with more than 90 percent of participants graduating with a Ph.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. in their intended biomedical research discipline. The graduates who receive this transformative research training go on to a broad range of careers, poised to accelerate discovery and innovation, and advance science and the practice of medicine around the globe.

“We have the opportunity to transform the face of biomedical research with students from diverse backgrounds who are extremely talented and bright ─ who may not have had as much exposure to research, but who have so much potential,” says Karen Hedin, Ph.D., Mayo’s co-leader of the renewed grant. “It’s amazing and fulfilling to see how the students grow throughout the program and witness the unique contributions they bring to their teams and biomedical research as a whole.”

The long-term impact of the NIH grant and Mayo’s Student Development program keeps growing, as many who graduate as diverse researchers and physician-scientists become role models for future students from different ethnicities and backgrounds. Many go on to tackle biomedical research geared toward specific patient population diseases or issues. For those who have successfully fulfilled what may have seemed an unreachable career goal, they are eager to pay it forward.

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About Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences has a long history of preparing students for careers as competitive, independent research investigators. The school currently offers Ph.D. degree research training in seven areas of biomedical specialization, along with one of the first interdisciplinary regenerative medicine research training programs in the country. Students within the school have the opportunity to train with world-class researchers at Mayo Clinic campuses in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Scottsdale, Arizona.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, comprehensive care to everyone who needs healing. Learn more about Mayo ClinicVisit the Mayo Clinic News Network.

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Nov 9, 2017 · Mayo Clinic professor receives national Distinguished Teacher Award


ROCHESTER, Minn. — Reflecting on your education, you probably remember one or two extraordinary teachers who stand out. They were the instructors who were able to make dull subjects interesting or complex information easily understandable. They had the humor, empathy and passion for teaching that made you look forward to their classes.

This week, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) honored Joseph Grande, M.D., Ph.D., professor of laboratory medicine and pathology at Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science with the 2017 Alpha Omega Alpha Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teacher Award for his outstanding contributions to medical education. Dr. Grande was one of four recipients to receive the national Alpha Omega Alpha award at the Association of American Medical Colleges’ annual meeting in Boston. Dr. Grande is one of those teachers students at Mayo tend to remember.

photo of Dr. Joseph Grande receiving award

Joseph Grande, M.D., Ph.D., center, of Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science receives the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Distinguished Teacher Award from Marsha Rappley, M.D., left, who is chair, Association of American Medical Colleges Board of Directors, and Darrell Kirch, M.D., right, who is president and CEO, Association of American Medical Colleges.

“The true reward of teaching is the ability to watch students grow in knowledge and skills, knowing, in part, that you have contributed to those abilities,” says Dr. Grande. “If I can play a small role in helping even a few students realize their incredible potential, it’s worth it.

Dr. Grande teaches pathology and cell biology to first-year medical students and urology to second-year students at Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. Since joining the faculty of the medical school in 1991, he has worked diligently to advance the integration of basic and clinical science in medical education. He also extends those efforts into Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences where he teaches cancer biology and mechanisms of disease to future Ph.D. research students. Along with his faculty duties, Dr. Grande is a consultant in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. He has joint appointments in the divisions of Nephrology and Hypertension and Surgery Research. He is clinical director of the Electron Microscopy Laboratory and directs a research program on chronic renal disease funded by the National Institutes of Health.

“I always look at the students I teach as the ones who will positively advance patient care and spark amazing scientific discoveries. It is that opportunity to make a difference that motivates me,” says Dr. Grande.

Dr. Grande considers himself more of a coach than a traditional teacher. He says that he adapts his approach to bring out the best in students and create a trusting learning environment where students feel comfortable enough to ask questions and challenge concepts. He notes teaching entails more than just imparting knowledge through the transfer of information. It’s developing a student’s ability to think – cultivating curiosity, problem-solving skills, and the desire and courage to look beyond the status quo.

His unique style of teaching definitely seems to be a success. Along with his most recent Association of American Medical Colleges national award, Dr. Grande has been named Teacher of the Year at Mayo Clinic School of Medicine a dozen times. He also has received Mayo’s Distinguished Educator Award, two Dean’s Recognition awards, a Medical School Career Educator Award and a Distinguished Service Award from the National Board of Medical Examiners.

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About Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Originally established in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1972, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has expanded to a national medical school with additional campuses in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida. U.S. News & World Report considers Mayo’s medical school one of the most highly competitive medical schools in the country for admittance with one of the highest faculty-to-student ratios. It also ranks Mayo Clinic School of Medicine as a Top 20 school for research training. Students at the school receive innovative medical education and participate in highly diverse clinical experiences across all Mayo campuses.

About Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences prepares students for careers as competitive, independent research investigators. The school offers Ph.D. and master’s degrees in seven areas of biomedical research training: biochemistry and molecular biology; biomedical engineering and physiology; clinical and translational science; immunology; molecular pharmacology and experimental therapeutics; neurobiology of disease; virology and gene therapy, along with a new interdisciplinary training program in regenerative sciences.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, comprehensive care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284 5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Jul 18, 2017 · Mayo Clinic School of Medicine gives medical education a new twist

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine Arizona campus's first class

ROCHESTER, Minn. – According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, there are more than 140 medical schools in the U.S. fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, and more seem to be cropping up regularly. So what can medical schools do to ensure their students are competitively well-prepared for residency training, the uncertainties of the ever-evolving health care system and the future of patient care?

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine thinks it might have a solution that begins with a unique model of a national medical school and entails its revamp of the traditional medical education.

This relatively small school originally established in Rochester, Minnesota in 1972 sits in the shadows of its parent organization: Mayo Clinic. For almost 45 years, the four-year M.D. training program purposefully kept its class size to around 50 incoming students per year to ensure highly skilled, individualized instruction with one of the highest faculty-to-student ratios in the country. The school chose not to balloon the size of its classes in Rochester. Instead, the medical school expanded its footprint nationally to Mayo Clinic’s campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida. Unlike many schools that have multiple campuses with separate governance and curriculum, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine chose to go a different route: one national medical school, centralized governance and shared curriculum spanning all campuses.

Besides its original campus, this July Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Arizona Campus opens its doors to an inaugural class of 50 first-year students. The total student body in Arizona will mushroom to 200 when the full four-year program finishes implementation in 2020. The school’s Florida campus is launching third-year and fourth-year programs, with hopes of expanding its Florida campus to a full four-year program in a few short years.

Mayo Clinic’s national medical school model enables students to receive the same learning experiences in basic and clinical sciences at their home campus, but travel among campuses for career exploration, research opportunities, clinical rotations and clerkships across multiple specialties.

“Imagine being able to learn at not only the No. 1 hospital in Arizona, but a No. 1 hospital in Florida and the No. 1 hospital in the nation in Rochester,” says Fredric Meyer, M.D., executive dean of education, Mayo Clinic. “Students will bring that knowledge back to their home campus and community. It will also strengthen their learning foundation for residencies, as our goal is to give our students unique learning experiences with many diverse patient populations across multiple care settings.” Dr. Meyer is the Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education and dean of Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. Another innovation across Mayo’s national medical school is the addition of courses in the science of health care delivery that were developed jointly with Arizona State University (ASU) and integrated into the national medical school’s curriculum. Under the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University Alliance for Health Care, medical students across all Mayo Clinic campuses will be the first in the nation to receive a certificate in the science of health care delivery jointly conferred with ASU, along with their medical degree from Mayo Clinic. The enhanced education covers areas such as person-centered care; population-centered care; high-value care; team-based care; health policy, economics and technology; and leadership. Students have the added option of pursuing a master’s in the science of health care delivery online through ASU.

Dr. Meyer explains that these curricular innovations in medical education won’t transform health care unless they’re broadly shared. For the past five years, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine has been involved with the American Medical Association’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education consortium, working closely with other consortium members to modernize medical education nationally.

Dr. Meyer notes that this expanded curriculum is necessary to prepare future physicians for the challenges of the evolving health care environment and the knowledge needed to improve the quality and value in health care. The school also is building collaborations with universities for dual-degree options, such as health informatics, biomedical diagnostics, global health, business administration and law.

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine’s updated medical education model also includes specialized training in physician wellness and resiliency to prepare future physicians for the rigors of clinical practice and prevent burnout – a growing concern nationwide.

Expansion and fast-forwarding changes to traditional medical education across campuses thousands of miles apart can have its challenges. Dr. Meyer shares that open communication, a shared belief in academic excellence and the bonds of highly collaborative leadership teams, faculty and staff are critical to this model of education.

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video B-ROLL (3:12) is available in the downloads.

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About Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Originally established in Rochester, Minnesota in 1972, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine is ranked among the top 20 medical schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. A national medical school with campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota, it is considered one of the most highly competitive, but affordable medical schools in the country for admittance. The expansion to a national medical school gives the school the ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to students across all Mayo campuses.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Matthew Brenden, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

May 31, 2017 · Mayo Clinic updates names of its college and schools

student learning from mentor in clinical setting

ROCHESTER, Minn. – The names of Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science and its five schools have changed to reflect each area’s focus and function more clearly.

The college and its schools annually educate medical students, physicians, research scientists and allied health professionals. Each school serves a distinct population of medical career based training, from the certificate level to Ph.D.

“The name changes are a start to push forth boldly that we are Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science,” says Fredric Meyer, M.D., Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education. “We do great medical education, and we felt it was important to also acknowledge the outstanding scientific research and health sciences training that occur within our schools. Our college and schools intertwine with both practice and research, like Mayo’s three shields.”

The new names are:

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science

Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, formerly Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, is the organizational umbrella for Mayo’s five schools ─ each dedicated to a segment of medical education or research training. Four of the schools offer training and clinical experiences with diverse patient populations in multiple practice settings, including Mayo Clinic campuses in three states and many of the 70 Mayo Clinic Health System practices in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

While Mayo Clinic has been training medical professionals from throughout the world for more than 150 years, it became an independent degree-granting institution accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a commission member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, in 1983.

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine was formerly Mayo Medical School. The new name aligns with the current academic industry norm. It is a single, national medical school with one curriculum across Mayo Clinic’s Arizona, Florida and Rochester campuses. It was named a “top 20” medical school by U.S. News & World Report for 2018. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Minnesota Campus has an enrollment of more than 200 students. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Arizona Campus welcomes its inaugural class of 50 students to its new four-year program in July. It will see an overall enrollment of more than 200 students by 2020. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine – Florida Campus will also offer 3rd and 4th year learning opportunities to medical students who begin on the Minnesota or Arizona campuses through its Florida FOCUS 2+2 program.

The school’s innovative science of health care delivery curriculum, developed in collaboration with Arizona State University (ASU), trains future physicians to meet the challenges of the nation’s evolving and diversifying health care system. The school’s students will be some of the first in the nation to receive a certificate in the science of health care delivery, along with their medical degree. Students also can complete a master’s degree in the science of health care delivery through ASU.

Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education

Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education, formerly Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, is the nation’s largest medical training program. Established in 1915, the school has more than 1,700 residents and fellows in 284 training programs, covering nearly every medical and surgical specialty on all three Mayo campuses. Fifty-five percent of the school’s training programs meet or exceed the national average for women in the given specialty. It is the only integrated school of graduate medical education conducted across broad geographic regions.

Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, formerly Mayo Graduate School, prepares students for careers as competitive, independent research investigators.

Mayo Clinic began preparing candidates for master’s and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical sciences in 1915. The school, now with an enrollment of more than 250, began conferring master’s and Ph.D. degrees independently in 1989.

The Ph.D. Program, which heavily emphasizes research training, leads to a doctorate in biomedical sciences with an emphasis in one of eight areas of specialization. Sixty percent of current students are women. The Regenerative Sciences Training Program, a first-of-its-kind Ph.D. program designed to train the next generation of regenerative specialists, launches in June and is sponsored by Mayo’s Center for Regenerative Medicine. The Medical Scientist Training Program offered in collaboration with Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, is an M.D.-Ph.D. training program. Students can pursue research opportunities at all three Mayo campuses.

Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences

Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences, formerly Mayo School of Health Sciences, offers 135 allied health education programs covering 58 health care professions. More than 1,100 students are enrolled across Mayo’s Arizona, Florida and Rochester campuses in programs ranging from certificate level to postdoctoral.

The school has multiple programs listed in the U.S. News & World Report rankings, including the Nurse Anesthesia program ranked as one of the top ten programs in the nation. Some programs are offered in collaboration with other accredited higher education providers. A new master’s degree program for physician assistants begins in fall 2019 in collaboration with multiple universities.

Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development

Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development, formerly Mayo School of Continuous Professional Development, teaches physicians, nurses and other allied health professionals the latest, most advanced practices in a broad range of medical specialties plus research, managed care, practice management and leadership. In 2016, more than 60,000 physicians and 41,000 health care professionals participated in more than 200 courses and other continuing educational activities.

Originally named using just “Mayo” between 1915 and the 1980s, the college and schools now incorporate the full Mayo Clinic name to reflect the collaboration and innovation within education, and their strong ties to Mayo Clinic’s clinical practice and research.

“The name changes better reflect the focus and breadth of educational training available at Mayo Clinic,” says Dr. Meyer. “We are simply clarifying the function of each school and Mayo’s capabilities to provide innovative education across the continuum of health care professions.”

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Matthew Brenden, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, 
newsbureau@mayo.edu

Mar 24, 2017 · Two Mayo Clinic staff members honored for lifetime contributions to quality

Pictured from left to right: Dr. Fred Meyer, Jeff Bolton, Dr. Dennis Manning, and Dr. Kannan RamarROCHESTER, Minn. – Randall Linton, M.D. and Dennis Manning, M.D., were recently presented with the Mayo Clinic Diamond Quality Fellow Lifetime Achievement Award at Mayo Clinic’s annual Quality Conference.

Honorees are nominated by their peers and selected by Mayo Clinic and Quality Academy leaders. The Diamond Award recipients demonstrate a long-standing commitment to quality improvement.

Dr. Linton, a pediatrician, is regional vice president of Mayo Clinic Health System in Northwest Wisconsin. Throughout his career, he has led or championed initiatives to improve the quality of patient care.

Under Dr. Linton’s leadership, Mayo Clinic Health System in Northwest Wisconsin:

  • Designed and implemented systems to identify, manage and improve key clinical processes
  • Has led the implementation of new care delivery models to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of community-based care
  • Created new compensation systems that align with organizational quality expectations
  • Was one of the first U.S. health care organizations to embrace Six Sigma quality improvement methodologies
  • Was recognized as a finalist for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, which recognized U.S. organizations for excellence in quality

Pictured from left to right: Dr. Fredric Meyer, Jeff Bolton and Dr. Randall Linton

Dr. Manning is research chair and faculty development chair for the Division of Hospital Internal Medicine on Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. He was the first program director for Quality and Patient Safety in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Medicine. Among his many accomplishments, he:

  • Co-designed Mayo Clinic’s multidisciplinary, systematic review of patient deaths in the hospital as a tool to improve quality and safety (This approach, still used at Mayo Clinic, is being marketed to other health care systems.)
  • Initiated and published the Warfarin Inpatient Safety Project, which has resulted in significant safety improvements for Mayo Clinic patients taking this blood-thinning medication
  • First proposed the inpatient Rapid Response Team for hospital patients experiencing a medical emergency
  • Led an initiative to improve each patient’s hospital summary, which is completed at discharge (A prompt, concise and hospital summary helps improve quality and safety as patients transition to home or other settings.)

“Dr. Linton and Dr. Manning are so deserving of the Diamond Quality Award,” says Nneka Comfere, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Quality Academy. “They have identified opportunities for quality improvement and taken the necessary steps to champion and lead those improvement efforts. The result is better care for Mayo Clinic patients.”

Learn more about Quality at Mayo Clinic.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

MEDIA CONTACT
Matthew Brenden, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005,
newsbureau@mayo.edu

Sep 1, 2016 · Minnesota Public Radio, Mayo Clinic to Offer Classical Relaxation to Hospital Patients

image of a male orchestra conductor directing with his baton in concertROCHESTER, Minn. — Patients at Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester; Jacksonville, Florida; and Phoenix will be able to relax to a custom blend of classical music provided by Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), beginning Sept. 1.

A new agreement calls for MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media (APM) — the largest provider of classical music programming in North America — to supply up to 17 hours of streaming classical music that Mayo Clinic can distribute at no charge to patients and visitors in patient rooms.

MPR initiated discussions with Mayo Clinic as part of an outreach program. The resulting collaboration will promote healing and comfort for patients. The music supplied by MPR will feature selections from the Relax Stream on APM’s YourClassical.org.Minnesota Public Radio banner logo

Research indicates that music can aid healing in many ways, such as improving pain control, reducing need for pain medication, improving quality of life, reducing anxiety, and lowering blood pressure.

“Among the various art forms, music is the best studied and the most convincingly demonstrated to provide health benefits to patients,” says Paul D. Scanlon, M.D., a pulmonologist and medical director of the Mayo Clinic Dolores Jean Lavins Center for Humanities in Medicine. “We are delighted to join with MPR to bring high-quality classical music programming to our patients and visitors.”

“Our mission at MPR is to enrich the mind and nourish the spirit, enhancing the lives of our audiences,” says Brian Newhouse, managing director of classical programming at Minnesota Public Radio/American Public Media. “Curating gorgeous music for the benefit of medical patients, in collaboration with such an esteemed institution like Mayo Clinic, delivers on that mission in a whole new way for MPR and is a joy to do.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

The Dolores Jean Lavins Center for Humanities in Medicine supports Mayo Clinic’s primary value — the needs of the patient come first — by integrating the arts and other expressions of human culture into the healing environment. The center collaborates with about 30 arts organizations, including the Guthrie Theater, Rochester Art Center and Rochester Public Library, to provide access to music, theater and dance performances; visual art exhibits; workshops; lectures; and art programs.

Mayo hospital patients will be able to access the Relax Stream through Mayo’s Video on Demand TV service on the Arizona, Florida and Minnesota campuses, and Mayo’s TV Humanities Channel, which airs concerts, theater and lectures, in Rochester.

Compositions by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and others will be the focus of the MPR-provided soundtrack. Only the title of the song, the composer and an identifier, “This is the Relax Stream, from YourClassical.org,” will appear on the TV screen. The audio will contain underwriting and sponsorship acknowledgments, but no fundraising or promotional messages.

About MPR
Minnesota Public Radio® operates a 45-station radio network serving nearly all of Minnesota and parts of surrounding states.  Reaching 900,000 listeners each week, MPR and its three regional services—MPR News, Classical MPR and The Current®—produce programming for radio, digital and live audiences.  Programs produced by MPR’s national programming division, American Public Media®, reach 19 million listeners via nearly 1,000 radio stations nationwide each week. APM is one of the largest producers and distributors of public radio programming in the world, with a portfolio that includes A Prairie Home Companion®, BBC World Service, Marketplace®, and the leading classical music programming in the nation. YourClassical, APM’s lifestyle classical music stream, packages classical music in an unconventional and innovative way with streams suited for life’s biggest moments and everyday situations.  For more information on MPR, visit minnesotapublicradio.org.  For more information on APM, visit americanpublicmedia.orgSource: Data are copyright Nielsen Audio. Data are estimates only.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.