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April 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Heart Transplant Saves Last Surviving Brother

By Dennis Douda

April is National Donate Life Month. Nearly 125,000 Americans are currently on the national transplant waiting list.

A heart transplant has spared a Michigan man from the fate that took the lives of all of his brothers. Ernie Balcueva inherited a condition that caused him to develop heart failure. It’s been a long journey, but he has a bright future ahead once again. From the Mayo Clinic News Network, Dennis Douda has his story.

Journalists: Broadcast quality video and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. Click here to read the full script.

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Tags: congenital heart defects, Congenital Heart Disease, Dr. Brooks Edwards, Dr. Richard Daly, Heart Transplant, HL, Organ Donation, organ transplant, Pkg


April 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 4/20/15

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams:

  • Bicycling is a great source of exercise and recreation. It can also be hazardous. Mayo Clinic sports medicine specialist Edward Laskowski, M.D., says wearing a helmet can reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury by up to 80 percent and offers bike safety tips.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT ] Click here for the script.

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Tags: Bicycling, Bike Safety, Dr. Ed Laskowski, exercise, helmet, traumatic brain injury, Vivien Williams


April 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Physicians Present New Research on Heart Transplant Care and Long-term Outcomes

By Ginger Plumbo

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Heart transplant experts from Mayo Clinic presented findings from three recent clinical studies involving heart transplant patients. The presentations took place during the 2015 International Society of Heart & Lung Transplant (ISHLT) in Nice, France, April 15–18.

Two hands holding a heartMayo Clinic physicians presented oral and poster presentations on 16 studies at ISHLT this year. The conference attracts 3,000 health care professionals from 45 countries who represent more than 15 different medical disciplines involved in the management and treatment of end-stage heart and lung disease. A few highlights of the Mayo Clinic-related research include:

“Are psychosocial characteristics predictive of death and rehospitalization after destination left ventricular assist device?”

  • This study examined psychosocial factors, such as drug use, depression and nonsmoking status to determine if they are associated with higher rehospitalization risk after a patient has received a left ventricular assist device (LVAD).
  • The study concluded that drug use, depression and nonsmoking status are associated with higher rehospitalization risk after LVAD. These data may be helpful in stratifying and communicating risk to patients who are considering LVAD as destination therapy.
  • Mayo Clinic researchers involved in this study include Shannon Dunlay, M.D., M.S.; Sarah Schettle, PAC; David Snipelisky, M.D.; Shashank Sharma; Sudhir Kushwaha, M.D.; John Stulak, M.D.
  • Date of presentation: April 15

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Tags: Dr. Brooks Edwards, Dr Darko Vucicevic, Dr David Joyce, Dr David Snipelisky, Dr Eric Steidley, Dr John Stulak, Dr Lyle Joyce, Dr. Richard Daly, Dr Robert Scott, Dr Shannon Dunlay, Dr Sudhir Kushwaha, Dr Walter Kremers, Heart Transplant, lung transplant, Minnesota news release, News Release


April 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

CREEPY, DREADFUL, WONDERFUL PARASITES: A Parasitologist’s View of the World – Week of April 19, 2015

By Dana Sparks

close-up of tickEvery week Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Read Dr. Pritt's blog: Parasite Wonders and submit your answers, comments and questions. Enjoy science!

Read more about Dr. Pritt's work.

Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer's. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients. 

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Tags: Dr Bobbi Pritt, Mayo Medical Laboratories, Parasite Wonders, ticks


April 20th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara

HousecallBanner

 

runner being timed by person holding a stopwatchTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Rev up your workout with interval training Want to burn more calories or simply shake up your workout? Try interval training. It's an easy technique whether you're a fitness novice or have been exercising for ages.

Alcohol use: If you drink, keep it moderate
Light to moderate drinking offers possible health benefits, but it's not risk-free. Here's a look at the connection between alcohol and your health.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Ease rheumatoid arthritis symptoms in the morning
The a.m. stiffness and pain of rheumatoid arthritis can get in the way of your morning routine. These tips may help.

E. coli: How can I tell if food is contaminated?
E. coli doesn't affect the way a food looks, smells or tastes. But you can protect yourself. Here's how.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: alcohol use, cosmetic surgery, diabetes blog, Ecoli, First-aid Kits, frozen shoulder, Healthy Recipes, Interval Training, Lupus, Monday's Housecall, rheumatoid arthritis, sinus headaches


April 18th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Many factors play into increased heart disease risk for those with RA

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is it true that people with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher risk of heart disease? How are the two conditions related? Is there a way to lower the risk?illustration of heart disease complications

ANSWER: Studies have shown that if you have rheumatoid arthritis, your risk of developing heart disease is two to three times higher than people who do not have the disorder. Although the exact connection between the two conditions is unclear, a number of factors seem to play into the increased heart disease risk. Regular check-ups, tests to check for heart problems, lifestyle changes and being able to recognize symptoms of heart disease can all help manage the risk.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease that causes swelling. It often affects the small joints in the hands and feet and causes joint tenderness, pain and stiffness. But the disorder can go beyond the joints, too, and that is part of the connection to heart disease.

The inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis may cause changes within the walls of your arteries. That can make the arteries narrow, lowering blood flow and raising blood pressure. Also, plaque can build up in the arteries — a condition called atherosclerosis. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: atherosclerosis, Dr. Mankad, Dr Rekha Mankad, Heart Disease, Mayo Clinic Q A, rheumatoid arthritis


April 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Something to Think About ~ How Best to Help Yourself

By Dana Sparks

circle of life paper doll people holding hands

How best to help yourself

"Remember that because of the way your brain works, when you are helping others, you are actually helping yourself."    Dr. Amit Sood

Amit Sood, M.D. is director of research in the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He also chairs the Mind-Body Medicine Initiative at Mayo Clinic

Click here to read previous blog posts. Follow Dr. Sood on Twitter @AmitSoodMD

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Tags: Dr Amit Sood, Helping, Something to Think About


April 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

pile of prescription drug bottles

Taking a prescription drug can be confusing. And taking several medications ... some before breakfast and others just before bed ... can multiply the challenges. On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio, pharmacist Jeremy Anderson answers common questions about managing your prescriptions. Also on the program, gynecologic oncologist Dr. Jamie Bakkum-Gamez talks about a new screening test for endometrial cancer that uses tampons. And we'll discuss ringing in your ears, known as tinnitus (TIN-ih-tus), with Mayo Clinic audiologist Dr. Janalene Niichel.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: If you miss a daily dose of medication, it's usually OK to take two doses the next day to make up for it.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Click here to listen to the program on Saturday, April 18, at 9:05 a.m., and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio, cancer screening, Dr Jamie Bakkum-Gamez, Dr Janalene Niichel, endometrial cancer, Hearing Loss, Jeremy Anderson, Prescription Drugs, Tinnitus


April 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Sharp Increase in E-Cigarette Use Among Teens

By Dana Sparks

person puffing and smoking an e-cigarette

A report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows use of e-cigarettes by middle and high school students has tripled in one year. Traditional cigarette smoking declined but according to the CDC report about 25 percent of all high school students and 8 percent of middle school students used some form of tobacco. That's estimated to be more than four million young people. (Click here for the complete CDC report.)

Jon Ebbert, M.D., associate director for research in the Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, says this is very concerning.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Ebbert are available in the downloads.

 

Read other Mayo Clinic News regarding E-cigarettes:
Nicotine Dependence Center
What are electronic cigarettes? Are they safer than conventional cigarettes?
Mayo Clinic Experts: What Should You Know About E-cigarettes?

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: CDC, Dr. Jon Ebbert, e-cigarettes, Mayo Clinic Nicotine Dependence Center, Smoking, Teenagers


April 17th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Low Blood Cell Counts: Side Effect of Cancer Treatment

By Jen O'Hara

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

 

Low blood cell counts: Side effect of cancer treatmentmedical person with needle taking a blood draw
There's a good reason your doctor has your blood drawn so often — low blood cell counts put you at risk of serious complications. Discover treatments, ways to cope and more.

Understanding how you learn key to cancer care
As you find out more about cancer, reflect on how you learn best. Then share it with your health care team, who can help you absorb information better.

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)
IORT is an intensive radiation treatment that's administered during surgery. It allows direct radiation to the target area while sparing normal surrounding tissue. Learn more about IORT treatment and research at Mayo Clinic.

 

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Tags: Cancer Care, cancer side effects, Intraoperative radiation therapy, IORT, Living With Cancer Blog, low blood cell counts


April 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Fan Spotlight on “The Voice” Is Story of Inspiration

By Dana Sparks

Jason Hanold in the Fan Spotlight on NBC's 'The Voice'

Jason Hanold in the Fan Spotlight on NBC's 'The Voice'

Jason Hanold was in his kitchen when one of his sons said, "Dad, your picture's on TV." Not only that, but Carson Daly was talking about Jason's story during a new "Fan Spotlight" segment during the (just slightly popular) TV show "The Voice." Then his youngest son, age 5, asked if he was up next to sing. That wouldn't have ended well, Jason suggests. But he was happy to talk about how the show and his cancer treatment at Mayo Clinic have come together. 

Jason's moment went something like this (and included about 21 seconds of air time): "This week's Fan Spotlight: Jason H. from Kenilworth, Illinois," host Carson Daly said. "He told us he schedules his cancer treatments at Mayo Clinic to coincide with our show because he says it gives him great courage. He and his four sons look forward to The Voice each and every week because they get a lot of inspiration from watching our artists perform."   Read the rest of the story In the Loop.

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Tags: Chemo Therapy, In The Loop, Jason Hanold, The Voice


April 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 4/16/15

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams:

  • Severe weather can strike anytime. That's why preparation is key. Mayo Clinic's emergency management team tells us how to build a three-day disaster kit and explains what essentials you need to stay safe during a weather emergency.

Click here for storm predictions and here for more information on how to build an first aid disaster kit.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT 1:32] Click here for the script.

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Tags: First Aid Kit, Mark Bilderback, Meredie Sexton, Severe weather, tornadoes, Vivien Williams, weather emergency


April 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Children and Screen Time: How Much is Too Much?

By Micah Dorfner

little boy staring at electric , digital television screen

How much time does your child spend watching TV or movies, playing with a smartphone or computer, or enjoying video games? Although some screen time can be educational, it's easy to go overboard. Consider this guide to children and TV, including what you can do to keep your child's screen time in check.

The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages media use by children younger than age two and recommends limiting older children's screen time to no more than one or two hours a day. Too much screen time can be linked to:

  • Obesity. The more TV your child watches, the greater his or her risk is of becoming overweight. Having a TV in a child's bedroom increases this risk as well. Children can also develop an appetite for junk food promoted in TV ads, as well as overeat while watching TV.
  • Irregular sleep. The more TV children watch, the more likely they are to have trouble falling asleep or to have an irregular sleep schedule. Sleep loss, in turn, can lead to fatigue and increased snacking.
  • Behavioral problems. Elementary students who spend more than two hours a day watching TV or using a computer are more likely to have emotional, social and attention problems. Additionally, exposure to video games is linked with an increased possibility of attention problems in children.
  • Impaired academic performance. Elementary students who have TVs in their bedrooms tend to perform worse on tests than do those who don't have TVs in their bedrooms.
  • Violence. Too much exposure to violence through media — especially on TV — can desensitize children to violence. As a result, children might learn to accept violent behavior as a normal way to solve problems.
  • Less time for play. Excessive screen time leaves less time for active, creative play.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Children and Television, Dr Dennis Spano, Family Health, Kids Health, Mayo Clinic Health System, Screen Time, TV


April 16th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Jen O'Hara

man in bed with eyes opened suffering insomnia

Insomnia: How do I stay asleep?

Water after meals: Does it disturb digestion?

Stress: Control email to regain control of your life

Antidepressants and weight gain: What causes it?

The Mayo Clinic Diet: A weight-loss program for life

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Tags: Antidepressants, digestion, insomnia, Mayo Clinic Diet, stress blog, Thursday Consumer Health Tips


April 15th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

All in a Day’s Work

By Dana Sparks

Dr. Charles Rosen in operating room for heart and liver transplant

This article was previously published In the Loop

It began in the early afternoon of March 3 when the news was received that a liver was available for a patient who needed both a heart and a liver transplant. From there, it cascaded into the completion of five liver transplants within a span of 24 hours.

Charles Rosen, M.D., a Mayo transplant surgeon, tells us that each year, Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus typically performs two or three transplant clusters, where more than one transplant is performed in a single day. “We do a little over 100 deceased donor transplants and around 20 living donor transplants a year,” he says.  

Read the rest of the story: In the Loop

 

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Tags: Dr Charles Rosen, Heart and Liver Transplant, In The Loop