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March 6th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

illustration of normal vertebrae and spinal stenosisStay active to keep fit. That can be difficult for people with spinal stenosis, a condition that causes serious back pain. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Paul Huddleston explains how spinal stenosis is treated.

Also on the program, Dr. Stephen Ekker discusses how the tiny zebrafish is helping to uncover treatments for everything from nicotine dependence to hearing loss. And we'll have the latest on recurring fever in children from Mayo Clinic pediatrician Dr. Thomas Boyce.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: If I haven’t had back problems by middle age, I’m not likely to have them when I get older.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Click here to listen to the program on Saturday, March 7, at 9:05 a.m., and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

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Tags: Dr Paul Huddleston, Dr Stephen Ekker, Dr Thomas Boyce, fever, Mayo Clinic Radio, Spinal Stenosis, zebrafish


March 6th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Cancer Survivors, Keep Your Brain in Shape

By Jen O'Hara

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

illustration of brain

Cancer survivors, keep your brain in shape
Cancer treatment can cause brain fog or chemo brain. Use these tips to help keep your mind organized.

Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy is an effective way to treat many types of cancer, but there are possible side effects. See what you can do to prepare.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center
Along with excellent patient care and rigorous research programs, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center offers educational and support services.

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Tags: cancer survivorship, chemo brain, Chemotherapy, Living With Cancer Blog, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center


March 5th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Expert Alert – Measles and Hearing Loss

By Joel Streed

With all the recent attention on measles, one risk that is seldom mentioned is long-term hearing loss. Several studies have shown a link between measles and hearing loss later in life.  Kenneth illustration of young boy with measles on his face and bodyBrookler, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurotologist and researcher, has been studying this connection for many years and says this type of hearing loss, otosclerosis, is highly preventable.

“The downstream effect of measles can be having insidious hearing loss in the 20s and 30s, having surgeries and then digressing to a point to where hearing aids may not work to the level they need a cochlear implant … all this could be prevented with timely vaccinations in childhood.”

MEDIA: To interview Dr. Brookler contact Bob Nellis at 507-284-5005 or e-mail newsbureau@mayo.edu. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Kenneth Brookler, Hearing Loss, Measles


March 5th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Named to Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” List

By Kelley Luckstein

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Fortune magazine named Mayo Clinic to its list of the “100 Best Companies Magazine cover with male hands creating a heart with his hands with the words "Best Companies to Work For" on the cover.to Work For” in 2015. This is Mayo’s 12th consecutive year on the magazine’s annual compilation of companies that rate high with employees. The list ranks Mayo Clinic 73 overall among the top 100 companies.

“We congratulate our employees for earning Mayo Clinic this distinction,” says John H. Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO of Mayo Clinic. “We hope they take great pride in this ‘100 Best’ national recognition.”

Mayo Clinic was selected among hundreds of companies vying for a place on the list this year. Applicant companies opt to participate in the selection process, which includes an employee survey and an in-depth questionnaire about their programs and company practices. Great Place to Work® then evaluates each application using its unique methodology based on five dimensions: credibility, respect, fairness, pride and camaraderie. Great Place to Work® has found that employeeGonda-300x199s believe they work for great organizations when they consistently trust the people they work for, have pride in what they do and enjoy the people they work with.

Information from the survey of Mayo Clinic employees is available on the Great Rated! site.

The print copy of Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” edition will be on
newsstands March 9.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: 100 Best Companies to Work For, Dr. John Noseworthy, FORTUNE, News Release


March 5th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Jen O'Hara

woman looking stressed paying bills

Need stress relief? Try the 4 A's

Antidepressants: Selecting one that's right for you

Heartburn or heart attack: When to worry

Celiac disease: Can gluten be absorbed through the skin?

Slide show: Exercises to improve your core strength

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Tags: Antidepressants, celiac disease, core strength exercises, heart attack symptoms, heartburn, stress


March 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines 3/4/2015

By Joel Streed

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines with Vivien Williams:

  • Treadmill Test for Longevity
  • Getting Ready to "Spring Ahead"

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script.

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Tags: Dr Joesph Kaplan, Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines, Sleep, Treadmill


March 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Lifestyle and Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By Micah Dorfner

woman holding her stomach, having a belly acheInflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which consists of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, can be a frustrating diagnosis to deal with. In general, there is no clear evidence that one trigger alone causes problems. Therefore, there is no particular food, diet or lifestyle that causes, prevents or cures IBD.

"Some patients are more fortunate and can control their IBD through medication. Other patients experience flare-ups, meaning the lining of the intestine is inflamed and the absorption of nutrients in the body is disturbed. Identifying the cause of this disturbance takes time, patience and some homework," says Sebastian Strobel, M.D., Mayo Clinic Health System gastroenterologist.

Keeping a food diary is a great way to manage flare-ups. Start with a low-fiber or liquid diet until the situation is resolved, and realize certain foods may make symptoms worse.

In general, IBD patients should follow a healthy diet while keeping these tips in mind: Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Sebastian Strobel, Gastroenterology, IBD, inflammatory bowel disease, Mayo Clinic Health System, stomach pain


March 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. Announce Agreement To Develop Wireless Sensors for Treatment of Obesity and Diabetes

By Brian Kilen

NFC patch sensor

NFC patch sensor

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. have reached an agreement to develop the next generation of wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes.

“We are hoping that this technology will be game-changer. These patch biosensors may help us reduce global obesity and diabetes,” says James Levine, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist and obesity researcher. “They are accurate, inexpensive, and can be integrated into the care people receive."

A first-of-its-kind, the wearable patch sensors are the size of a small bandage, and are designed to be painless, wireless and disposable. In the bandage is a sensor that communicates via a closed-loop diabetes management system which is compatible with cell phones. The system will allow researchers to monitor movement and develop treatments for obesity and related conditions.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: diabetes, Mayo Clinic Ventures, News Release, News Release Minnesota, obesity, Research


March 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Releases PathWays: New Online “Case Study” Tool for Pathologists and Medical Enthusiasts

By Andy Tofilon

Mayo Clinic Pathways logo

Mayo Clinic fellows and residents publishing weekly practical case studies on the Mayo Medical Laboratories blog for medical professionals around the world.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A dark purplish blob (a.k.a., a karyosome) floats randomly next to perfectly pink circles. Electric yellow spots stand out in a sea of stained dark blue cells, viewed at 40 times the original magnification. For a pathologist, this unique “artwork” provides vital information that will unlock needed medical diagnoses for sick patients. These scientific images — combined with brief patient descriptions — comprise Mayo Clinic PathWays — an online learning tool for pathologists and for those who enjoy learning about medicine. Mayo Medical Laboratories and Mayo Clinic’s Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Graduate Medical Education Office have developed this case-study tool that will offer weekly “challenges” posted to the Mayo Medical Laboratories website.

MEDIA CONTACT: Gina Chiri-Osmond, Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: case studies, Dr Bobbi Pritt, Mayo Clinic Laboratory Medicine, Mayo Clinic Pathology, Mayo Clinic PathWays, Mayo Medical Laboratories, Minnesota news release, News Release


March 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Food Labels: Decoding Food Terms

By balzerdeb

March is National Nutrition Month. As Americans strive to better understand the new dietary recommendations set forth in the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, many struggle to best understand just what we are eating.Woman with shopping cart in supermarket Decoding food labels and food marketing buzz words can be a challenge, especially when so many of the terms are vague.

Donald Hensrud, M.D., offers insight on what some common terms such as whole, unprocessed, low fat and natural mean and how they affect our health.

And, he provides tips on how to shop a grocery store to find the most healthful food items, including vegetables, whole grain breads and pastas, brown rice, lean meats, fish, beans, low-fat dairy products and heart-healthy fats such as nuts and olive oils.

Journalists: Soundbites are available in the downloads.

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Tags: dietary guidelines, Dr. Donald Hensrud, food labels


March 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Reports Strong Performance in 2014, Extends Hope and Healing to Millions

By Karl W Oestreich

Dr. Noseworthy

Dr. Noseworthy

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic reports a strong 2014 performance, including providing direct care for more than 1.3 million people, contributions of $410 million to its pension plan as a commitment to employees, and plans for a $1.5 billion investment to fund information technology infrastructure.

“Whether viewed through the lens of quality, patient outcomes, research advances, operational performance or sharing our knowledge with the world — by all measures, we had an extraordinary year,” says John Noseworthy, M.D., president and CEO, Mayo Clinic. “That success allowed us to reinvest in our people, our infrastructure and our mission so we can better serve our patients.”

Jeff Bolton

Jeff Bolton

“As a nonprofit organization, it’s important for us to not only reinvest in our technology infrastructure, but also invest in our employees,” says Jeff Bolton, vice president, administration, Mayo Clinic. To that end, Mayo Clinic made an additional contribution of $190 million to its pension fund, bringing the total 2014 contribution to $410 million. This additional investment was necessary to ensure Mayo Clinic will meet its commitment to current and future retirees.

“Our financial performance gives us the flexibility to invest in new initiatives that will help our patients,” says Kedrick Adkins Jr., Mayo chief financial officer. These funds are committed to mission-advancing projects. The funding includes five areas of focus, Adkins says:

Kedrick Adkins Jr.

Kedrick Adkins Jr.

  • Information technology infrastructure: $1.5 billion over multiple years to fund a new electronic health record and revenue cycle management system, network refresh and data transaction security upgrades.
  • Employee pension plan: $410 million contribution in 2014. This includes an originally planned $220 million contribution and an additional $190 million contribution as a commitment to fully fund the pension plan for employees.
  • Practice innovation: approximately $200 million in 2014 which includes funding of Mayo’s three hybrid centers — individualized medicine, regenerative medicine and the science of health care delivery — as well as Mayo Clinic practice priorities and information knowledge management activities.
  • Education: $275 million in 2014 funding for educational activities.
  • Research: $648 million in 2014 funding for research activities — $276 million from Mayo and $372 million from external resources.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Destination Medical Center, Dr. John Noseworthy, Dr Sameer Keole, electronic health record, Jeff Bolton, Mayo Clinic 2014 Performance Report, Mayo Clinic Care Network, Mayo Clinic Proton Beam Therapy Program, Minnesota news release, News Release


March 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q & A: Chronic sinusitis symptoms resemble a cold, but last months

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’ve had an awful cold for months. My doctor recommends that I be tested for chronic sinusitis. What would that involve? How is chronic sinusitis treated?illustration of person's face with sinus infection and inflammation

ANSWER: Sinusitis is inflammation of the sinuses, which are the air-containing pockets in the skull and facial bones around your nose. Chronic sinusitis develops when inflammation lasts for more than 12 weeks. Testing involves a visit to an ear, nose and throat, or ENT, doctor who will examine your sinuses. Most chronic sinusitis can be managed with medical therapy. However, if your symptoms or the inflammation do not respond to medical therapy, surgery may be necessary. The goal of treatment is to restore sinus health and function.

Symptoms of chronic sinusitis often resemble a cold. A cold is usually caused by a viral infection and is often accompanied by a runny or stuffed-up nose, sneezing, sore throat, watery eyes and a fever. This kind of acute viral sinusitis usually lasts seven to 10 days.

In rare instances, you may get a bacterial infection as a result of a cold, resulting in acute bacterial sinusitis. If that happens, cold symptoms get worse after seven to 10 days. You also may have yellow or green nasal drainage, pain in your face or teeth, and a fever. Acute sinusitis lasts up to four weeks. When symptoms persist for more than 12 weeks, you may have chronic sinusitis. But some cases of chronic sinusitis can develop subtly, without a preceding viral infection. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: chronic sinusitus, Dr Devyani Lal, Mayo Clinic Q A, sinusitis


March 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

With Daylight Saving Time Approaching, Learn Why Sleep Health is Important

By Micah Dorfner

Alarm clock on bedside table and woman asleepMANKATO, Minn. — Fall back, spring forward. We’ve all heard the saying, and it helps people remember which way to set their clocks for the start and end of Daylight Saving Time. Although it’d be nice to gain an hour of sleep twice a year, that’s not the case. Starting Sunday, March 8 at 2 a.m., we’ll all lose an hour. Altering your sleep schedule, or having poor sleep habits to begin with, can have a greater effect on your health than you may think.

“With Daylight Saving Time, we lose an hour of sleep, which causes significant fatigue in most people and can linger for days or weeks,” says Martha Yanci Torres, M.D., neurologist and sleep specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato. “To minimize the impact, you can make gradual adjustments.”

She provides this advice:

  • Go to bed 15 minutes early, starting several days before the change, and increase by 15 minutes every couple of nights. Make an extra effort to be well-rested the week before the time change.
  • If you feel sleepy the Sunday after the change to Daylight Saving Time, take a short nap (15 to 20 minutes) in the early afternoon — not too close to bedtime. Assess how a nap affects your sleep quality. For some, napping can make nighttime sleeping harder. But for others, a short nap can be revitalizing without ruining their night's sleep.
  • Avoid sleeping in an hour longer in the morning.
  • In general, you should try to go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. This helps your body regulate its sleep. If possible, wake up at the same time on the weekends too, which makes Monday mornings easier to bear.

“Regardless of the time of year, proper sleep is an essential part of life,” says Dr. Yanci Torres. “There are many benefits to practicing good sleep health, as well as risks for cutting sleep too short.”

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Tags: Daylight Saving Time, Dr Martha Yanci Torres, Mayo Clinic Health System, Neurology, Sleep health


March 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

U.S. Women’s Awareness of Breast Density Varies by Race and Ethnicity, Education and Income, Mayo Clinic Study Finds

By Joe Dangor

Disparities in the level of awareness and knowledge of breast density exist among U.S. women, according to the results of a Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Xray of non dense breast with cancer

Image A: Non-dense breast tissue showin.g a small cancer (upper left)

Breast density is the term used to describe the variation in dense tissue on a mammogram image. Fatty breast tissue appears more radiologically translucent than dense (fibroglandular) breast tissue. Regions of a breast that comprise fatty tissue will appear darker on a mammogram, while regions that comprise dense tissue appear whiter.

Dense breast w cancer

Image B: Dense breast tissue with palpable lump, cancer diagnosed (far right center)

Increased breast density has been shown to mask cancers on the mammogram as well as to be associated with future risk of breast cancer. Recent legislation in several states mandates that women be given information about breast density in order to guide decisions about breast cancer screening.

Researchers conducted a national cross-sectional survey of 2,311 women ages 40 to 74 in English and Spanish. The survey response rate was 65 percent. Overall, more than half of women who responded (58 percent) had heard of breast density, 49 percent were aware that breast density affects breast cancer detection and 53 percent knew that breast density is associated with cancer risk.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Tags: Breast Cancer, breast density, Deborah Rhodes, disparities, Dr Rhodes, JCO, Journal of Clinical Oncology, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Minnesota news release, News Release


March 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines 3/2/2015

By balzerdeb

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines with Vivien Williams:

  • Good news for coffee drinkers
  • Peanut allergies and children

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script.

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Tags: coffee, Dr. Donald Hensrud, Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines, Peanut Allergy, Vivien Williams