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July 12th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Decision to treat or not treat unruptured brain aneurysm based on variety of considerations

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: During a recent MRI, my doctor detected a small, unruptured brain aneurysm. What could have caused this? How do you decide whether or not to treat an unruptured aneurysm?

ANSWER: A brain aneurysm is a bulge or balloon in a blood vessel in the brain. If it ruptures, a brain aneurysm can lead to serious health problems. But most small brain aneurysms do not rupture or require treatment. The decision to treat or not is based on a variety of considerations.

Arteries are blood vessels that bring blood from your heart to the rest of your body. They have thick walls with a smooth, thin inner lining. Over time, weak spots can develop in artery walls. When that happens, a bulge can develop. The bulge may progress to form a balloon shaped pouch on the artery, which is called an aneurysm.

A number of risk factors can affect your chances of developing a brain aneurysm. Brain aneurysms become more common with older age. High blood pressure can increase the likelihood of an aneurysm. Some brain aneurysms can be caused by blood infections or head injuries. Certain behaviors, such as smoking and using recreational drugs, also can raise the risk.

A brain aneurysm is a concern because it can leak or rupture, causing bleeding into or around the brain, a condition known as a hemorrhagic stroke. A ruptured aneurysm can quickly become life-threatening and requires prompt medical treatment. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Yoga Can Help Cancer Survivors Overcome Fatigue

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Yoga helps cancer survivors with overall well-beingmiddle-aged couple doing yoga outside on a grassy lawn
Yoga can help cancer survivors overcome lack of energy and fatigue.

Cancer survivors: Late effects of cancer treatment
Cancer survivors can experience side effects long after their cancer treatment ends.

Polycythemia vera
Get the facts on this slow-growing type of blood cancer in which your bone marrow makes too many red blood cells.

Managing chemotherapy side effects
Chemotherapy treatment carries with it a host of potential side effects — fatigue, hair loss and more. Learn about managing chemotherapy side effects.

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July 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

Montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures

On Saturday, July 12, at 9 a.m. CT, we’ll talk about the groundbreaking research involving the measles virus to fight cancer. The process is called oncolytic virotherapy and Dr. Stephen Russell will be our guest, along with his patient Stacy Erholtz who received 10 million doses – a seemingly lethal amount – of the measles virus to treat her multiple myeloma.

The Wall Street Journal article on Health Trackers is found here.

WATCH this video:

This Saturday we’ll hear more about Stacy’s amazing story, discuss with Dr. Russell the science behind virus therapy and learn where future research might be headed. Are there other diseases that could be cured by using viruses? Where did all those doses of measles vaccine come from? It’s a remarkable development in the future of medicine. Join us.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

More information about Living Organ Donation can be found here.  
The Living Donor Evaluation Form can be found here
The Mayo Transplant Center can be reached at 866-227-1569

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment July 12, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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July 11th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic to Open New Primary Care Clinic in Southeast Rochester

By Rebecca Eisenman

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic will expand primary care services in south Rochester. Mayo Clinic will lease clinical space currently under construction at 4544 Canal Place Southeast within the Shoppes on Maine development. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of 2014. Patients will be seen at the new site in early 2015.

South clinic sketch“The south Rochester location is an investment in our patients’ health and well-being, and will provide greater access to Mayo Clinic care within the community,” says David Agerter, M.D., medical director, Mayo Clinic Employee and Community Health. “It's also in response to feedback from our employees and patients who have requested Mayo Clinic primary care services in this part of the city. This is part of a broader effort to make more Mayo Clinic services, both face-to-face and non-visit care, accessible and convenient to the community.” Read the rest of this entry »

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July 10th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Calls for Standardization of Safe Imaging Protocols for Children

By Rebecca Eisenman

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The benefits of medical imaging far outweigh the risks when children receive The Right Exam, ordered The Right Way, with The Right Radiation Dose. However, overuse and misuse of imaging change the benefit-risk ratio and Mayo Clinic is leading a collaborative effort to ensure a national protocol is put into action. The commentary, published online in the Journal of Patient Safety, calls for the American College of Radiology, the Joint Commission, the Intersociety Accreditation Commission, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to require three safety practices for accreditation of all American hospitals and advanced diagnostic imaging facilities. “No hospital or medical imaging facility in the country should be granted the privilege of imaging children unless it first meets fundamental safe practice performance measures,” says Stephen Swensen, M.D., lead author and radiologist, Mayo Clinic.

Sound bites with Dr. Swensen are available in downloads. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 10th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Announces Online Video Education for Medical Professionals

By Brian Kilen

Online video lectures for medical professionals from Mayo Clinic

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic is now making its video education medical grand rounds lectures and clinical presentations on recent innovations in patient care, education and research accessible to other medical professionals in the new online medical professional video center.

medical professional videoThese lectures contain new practice procedures, treatment options and research covering a wide variety of specialties.For example, a video lecture on Choline C-11 treatment for recurrent prostate cancer describes the benefits to patients as well as the production, imaging and processing facilities necessary to provide the treatment. Another, fecal microbiota transplant, provides step-by-step details of how the procedure is completed so providers and patients can see the process from beginning to end. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 10th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

collage of healthcare related images with diversity of children being examinedShould children be tested for high cholesterol?

Pediatric white blood cell disorders

Rheumatoid arthritis: Protect your health with vaccines

Low potassium (hypokalemia)

Can arthritis pain medications be harmful?

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July 9th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Oboe Becomes a Surgical Instrument

By Dennis Douda

For all of the high-tech and futuristic technology finding its way into health care, Mayo Clinic surgeon Shelagh Cofer, M.D., proves that old-fashioned common sense has its place too. How do you make sure a procedure to restore a musician’s wind power has worked before you leave the operating room? You just bring a little something extra. [TRT 2:24]

Journalists: The video package and extra b-roll of the patient/musician performing are available in the downloads. To read the full script click here.

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July 8th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Expert Alert: Sundeep Khosla, M.D. to Testify – Modernizing Clinical Trials

By Colette Gallagher

Dr. Khosla testifying on modernizing clinical trials - Capitol Hill hearingWatch now LIVE 10 am ET Energy & Commerce Committee Hearing.  

Principal Investigator and Director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS)Sundeep Khosla, M.D.,is testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health as part of the Committee’s 21st Century Cures Initiative Wed., July 9, 2014. Dr. Khosla will focus his testimony on the need and opportunity to modernize clinical trials. “I applaud the Committee’s 21st Century Cures Initiative and, in particular, the Health Subcommittee’s focus on the clinical trial process,” says Dr. Khosla. “It is imperative that we streamline and modernize clinical trials’ processes to accelerate the speed of discovery to delivery of more effective, innovative and personalized treatments for patients.” In addition, Dr. Khosla commends the Committee’s attention to the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program. He continues, “The work of the CTSA program and its 62 sites is very important and offers great opportunity to speed translation and implementation of high priority clinical trials.”

Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

MEDIA CONTACT: To interview Dr. Khosla about modernizing the clinical trial system, please contact Colette Gallagher, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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July 8th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q & A: Child’s chronic cough may be symptom of asthma

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My son, 8, has been coughing off-and-on at night for a few weeks and says his chest hurts, but he never complains about it during the day. Could he have asthma? How is it diagnosed? If it’s very mild, would he still need treatment?

ANSWER: Based on the symptoms you describe, it is possible that your son has asthma. His doctor can confirm the diagnosis using a test that measures lung function called spirometry. Even in mild cases of asthma, treatment usually is recommended to help relieve symptoms.little boy using an asthma inhaler

When someone has asthma, the small airways in the lungs narrow, swell, and produce extra mucus. This can lead to a variety of signs and symptoms. In children older than 3, wheezing is typically the most specific asthma symptom. But in some kids, a chronic cough may be the only asthma symptom that they have. A persistent cough at night, an illness that includes a cough that lasts more than three weeks, or coughing in response to cold air, exercise, or laughing may all be the result of asthma.

When asthma is suspected in a child who is 5 years or older, the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program expert panel recommends lung function testing using spirometry. For this test, your son will take a deep breath and breathe out as hard as he can for several seconds into a tube that is attached to a machine called a spirometer.
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July 7th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MONDAY’S HOUSECALL

By Dana Sparks

Housecall Banner blue and white

THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIESwoman holding two bottles of sun screen or tanning lotion
Sunless tanning: What you need to know
Sunless tanning products can provide a safe, natural-looking tan — if they're applied carefully and correctly.

Memory loss: When to seek help
Memory loss may indicate normal aging, a treatable condition or the onset of dementia. Find out how to help yourself or a loved one.

Urinary incontinence surgery in women: The next step
If symptoms of stress incontinence or an overactive bladder are disrupting your life, surgery may be an option.

Silver saltshaker with spilled saltEXPERT ANSWERS
Sea salt vs. table salt: What's the difference?
The most notable differences between sea salt and table salt are in their taste, texture and processing.

Coping with anxiety: Can diet make a difference?
Dealing with anxiety is a challenge. Eating habits may play a role.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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July 5th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Spells of dizziness a common problem with many possible causes

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am 68 and have periodic spells of dizziness. They don’t last long and I don’t seem to have any other symptoms. Should I see a doctor? What might they indicate?elderly man touching forehead and appears to be dizzy or has a headache

ANSWER: Dizziness is a common problem with many possible causes. They can range from relatively minor issues, such as certain medications triggering dizziness, to more serious underlying medical problems. When dizziness persists, as in your case, it is a good idea to make an appointment to see your doctor and have the condition evaluated.

Although the term “dizziness” sounds quite specific, there are actually several kinds of dizziness. One involves feeling a loss of balance, as if you are unsteady on your feet or feel like you may fall. Another includes a sensation of being lightheaded or feeling faint, as if you might pass out. A third is feeling as if you are spinning or that the world is spinning around you. This type of dizziness is called vertigo.

It is helpful for you to be able to describe to your doctor exactly what you are experiencing during your episodes of dizziness. Your description can offer clues to the potential source of the problem. For example, conditions that affect the balance mechanism in your inner ear frequently lead to dizziness, with a feeling of vertigo that happens when you move your head.
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July 4th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

Montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures

This week's program is a rebroadcast from Donate Life Month, focusing on the importance of registering as organ, eye and tissue donors. Tune in this Saturday, July 5, at 9 a.m. CT, as we discuss organ donation with good samaritan kidney donor Philip Fischer, M.D., and director of the Mayo Clinic kidney transplant program Mikel Prieto, M.D. There is so much to learn about donating the gift of life! Join us!

Myth or Matter of Fact:  I'm not in the best of health, so I probably can't be a donor.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

More information about Living Organ Donation can be found here.  
The Living Donor Evaluation Form can be found here
The Mayo Transplant Center can be reached at 866-227-1569

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment July 6, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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July 4th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tips for Cancer Survivors to Keep Cool in the Summer Heat

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Tips for cancer survivors to keep cool in the summer heatWoman resting in a tree hammock in the shade on a hot summer day
Cancer survivors should be careful this season — there's potential for dehydration and sunburn. Try these tips to stay safe.

Functional foods give a boost to your wellness
Researchers are studying how certain foods — called functional foods — can help enhance health and prevent illness.

Cancer survivorship programs
Cancer survivorship programs are services that help cancer survivors live well after treatment. Find out more.

Managing chemotherapy side effects
Chemotherapy treatment carries with it a host of potential side effects — fatigue, hair loss and more. Learn about managing chemotherapy side effects.

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July 3rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

July 4th celebration picnic table with watermelon, berries and sparkler

Summer food safety tips

What is wheatgrass? Why is it in my drink?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation

Don't prejudge Alzheimer's wanderers who may really have a goal

Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs)

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