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June 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic PathWays June 2: What’s the Diagnosis?

By April Josselyn

Mayo Medical Labs Pathways bannner

This week's Mayo Clinic PathWays case study is LIVE
View the case and make your diagnosis.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic PathWays in this news release.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic PathWays, Mayo Medical Laboratories, pathology


June 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Keep Stress Out of Summer Vacation

By Micah Dorfner

woman resting in a tree hammock in the shade on a hot summer day

PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, Wis. — You may not think that summer and stress go together, but they often do. Routines change frequently, and downtime can lead to complaining and sibling squabbles. Summertime events, such as graduations, family reunions and vacations, come with their own set of stressors. So, what can you do to stress less and have more fun this summer? Dixie Jackson, behavioral health specialist at Mayo Clinic Health System, offers a few time management tips and stress relievers to help you and your family enjoy the summer.

  • Involve the kids in setting up routines for the summer. Cooperation will be much greater if children are part of the activity-planning process.
  • If you’re home with your children during the summer, try to set aside alone time with each child.
  • Find some projects on which the whole family can work together. You’ll be getting your chores done and spending time together as a family.
  • If your children are older, give them a set of daily chores they need to complete before they can play. They can tidy their rooms, make their beds or put away dishes.
  • Plan some low-cost summer activities for the family, like camping in the backyard or afternoons at the swimming pool.
  • Embrace downtime. The school-year can be stressful — kids need downtime to rest and restore.

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Tags: Dixie Jackson, Family Health, Mayo Clinic Health System, News Release, stress, vacation


June 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Acid reflux often associated with hiatal hernia

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Six years ago I was diagnosed with acid reflux and a hiatal hernia. I have had an endoscopy as well as other tests, but doctors say there is nothing I medial illustration of espophagus, diaphragm, stomach, acid refluc and hiatal herniacan do other than take medication. (I am currently on doxepin.) But I am still having sharp pains that wake me up around 4 a.m. Do you have any suggestions?

ANSWER: Your situation is very common in people who have a hiatal hernia. There are a number of lifestyle changes that may help reduce your nighttime symptoms. Taking an acid-reducing medication may make a difference, too. In rare cases, surgery may be necessary if nothing else works to relieve symptoms.

A hiatal hernia happens when part of your stomach pushes up through your diaphragm. Your diaphragm has a small opening, called a hiatus, which your esophagus passes through on its way to your stomach. The stomach can push up through this opening and cause a hiatal hernia. Acid reflux — a condition in which stomach acid flows up into the esophagus — is often associated with a hiatal hernia. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: acid reflux, Dr Pannala, Dr Rahul Pannala, hiatal hernia, Mayo Clinic Q and A


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

CREEPY, DREADFUL, WONDERFUL PARASITES: A Parasitologist’s View of the World – Week of June 1, 2015

By Dana Sparks

endocervical smear stained with Papanicolaou stainEvery week Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Read Dr. Pritt's blog: Parasite Wonders and submit your answers, comments and questions. Enjoy science!

Read more about Dr. Pritt's work.

Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer's. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients.

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Tags: Dr Bobbi Pritt, Mayo Medical Laboratories, Parasite Wonders


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

In Case You Missed the Show: #MayoClinicRadio PODCAST May 30

By Dana Sparks

Dr. Brooks Edwards talking on Mayo Clinic Radio

LISTEN:  MayoClinicRadio PODCAST May 30, 2015

There are more than 100,000 people in the U.S. waiting for a donor organ. Director of the William J. von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration Center at Mayo Clinic Dr. Brooks Edwards and transplant surgeon Dr. Charles Rosen join the program to talk about the state of organ transplantation. Also on the program ... springtime allergiesDr. Rohit Divekar has tips for reducing symptoms. Plus, pediatric surgeon Dr. Christopher Moir explains ways to help prevent pediatric falls.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Study may change practice of whole brain radiation therapy for limited brain metastases

By Joe Dangor

Dr. Jan Buckner presents in 5/31/15 ASCO press briefing on treatment advances

Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jan Buckner presents in 5/31/15 ASCO press briefing on cancer treatment advances.

CHICAGO -- A new study presented at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology suggests that the practice should be reconsidered. More than 650,000 patients a year in the U.S. are diagnosed and treated for cancers that spread to the brain. For about 200,000 of these patients, those with 1-3 small brain metastases, a combination of whole brain radiation therapy and radiosurgery, a highly focused form of radiation therapy, have been the standard of care.

While whole brain radiation therapy improves tumor control it did not improve survival and it was shown to have deleterious effects on patients cognitive abilities. “This is the classic question: Which is worse, the disease or the treatment,?” said Jan Buckner, M.D., an oncologist at Mayo Clinic and senior author of the study. “We used to offer whole brain radiation early on, but we now know that the toxicities of this therapy are worse for the patients than the cancer growth or recurrences in the brain. We expect that practice will shift to reserve the use of whole brain radiation therapy for salvage therapy (used when cancer will not respond to other therapies) and in end-stage palliative care.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu 

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Tags: American Society of Clinical Oncology, ASCO, Dr. Jan Buckner, Radiation Therapy


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 6/1/15

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams

  • An international study presented at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology shows a cancer drug combo is shrinking melanoma tumors by nearly 60 percent. While this new trial offers hope for treatment, Mayo Clinic dermatologist Dr. Dawn Davis says prevention, as well as detection, are extremely important in reducing risk of skin cancer(Read more about the melanoma study in this BCC report.)

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT :57] Click here for the script.

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Tags: Dr. Dawn Davis, Melanoma, skin cancer, Mayo Clinic News Network Headline


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

How Does Human Behavior Lead to Surgical Errors? Mayo Clinic Researchers Count the Ways

By Sharon Theimer

Four to nine factors contributed to each `never event,’ study finds

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Why are major surgical errors called “never events?” Because they shouldn’t happen — but do. Mayo Clinic researchers identified 69 never events among 1.5 million invasive procedures performed over five years and detailed why each occurred. Using a system created to investigate military plane crashes, they coded the human behaviors involved to identify any environmental, organizational, job and individual characteristics that led to the never events. Their discovery: 628 human factors contributed to the errors overall, roughly four to nine per event. The study results are published in the journal Surgery.gallbladder removal, surgery in the operation theatre

The never events included performing the wrong procedure (24), performing surgery on the wrong site or wrong side of the body (22), putting in the wrong implant (5), or leaving an object in the patient (18). All of the errors analyzed occurred at Mayo; none were fatal.

The Mayo Rochester campus rate of never events over the period studied was roughly 1 in every 22,000 procedures. Because of inconsistencies in definitions and reporting requirements, it is hard to find accurate comparison data, but a recent study based upon information in the National Practitioner Data Bank estimated that the rate of such never events in the United States is almost twice that in this report, approximately 1 in 12,000 procedures.

MEDIA CONTACT: Sharon Theimer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Journalist: Sound bites of Dr. Bingener discussing the study are available in the downloads. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: human factors, Juliane Bingener, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, medical errors, Minnesota news release, Never Events, News Release, Surgery, Surgical Errors


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara

Housecall BannerSports dumbbells in modern sports club.THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Weight training: Do's and don'ts of proper technique
Take advantage of weight training's benefits — less fat, more strength, better muscle tone and greater bone density. Avoid common mistakes and prevent injury with these tips.

Meatless meals: The benefits of eating less meat
Beside saving money, going meatless a few times a week may also help your heart. Here are some easy and tasty swaps to make.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Hoodia: Does this dietary supplement help?

Hoodia manufacturers say the supplement controls appetite, but where's the evidence to back up these claims?

Do I really need an annual eye exam to prevent macular edema?
Regular eye exams are an important tool for preventing diabetes-related eye complications. Don't skip your yearly screening.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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Tags: diabetic macular edema, Healthy Recipes, Hoodia, meatless meals, Monday's Housecall, muscle pain, nutrition-wise blog, quit smoking, salmonella infection, ulcerative colitis, weight training


June 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Baxter Ventures, Mayo Clinic and Velocity Pharmaceutical Development Announce the Formation of Vitesse Biologics, LLC, a Company Structured to Accelerate Therapeutic Innovation

By Brian Kilen

Vitesse formed to identify and advance early stage biologic research in immunology, hematology and oncology

Deerfield, IL., Rochester, MN and South San Francisco, CA. Baxter Ventures, the venture arm of Baxter International Inc. (NYSE:BAX), Mayo Clinic and Velocity Pharmaceutical Development, LLC (“VPD”) today announced the formation of Vitesse Biologics, LLC, (“Vitesse”). Vitesse is a unique collaboration model initiated by Baxter Ventures to focus on the development of antibody and protein-based therapeutics in the areas of immunology, hematology, and oncology. Following the spin-off of Baxter BioScience as Baxalta Incorporated, anticipated to take place by mid-2015, the Vitesse relationship will be managed by the planned venture arm, Baxalta Ventures, for the new company.

Baxter Media Contact: Kellie Hotz, (224) 948-5353, media@baxter.com

Baxter Investor Contact: Mary Kay Ladone, (224) 948-3371

Mayo Clinic Media Contact: Brian Kilen, (507) 284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Velocity Media Contact: Leslie Loven, (415) 509-5110,  leslie@vpd.net

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Tags: biologics, cancer, DMC, Dr Greg Gores, drugs, Hematology, Leadership, Mayo Clinic Ventures, Minnesota news release, News Release, Research, Vitesse


May 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Something to Think About ~ What should replace hurry?

By Dana Sparks

rush hour and crowds of people in a hurry


A mind in hurry, hurries past the present

"I am in a hurry when I am getting late. I am in a hurry when I am on time. I find myself hurrying even when I am before time. Hurry for me has become a habit." - Dr. Amit Sood

Amit Sood, M.D. is director of research in the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He also chairs the Mind-Body Medicine Initiative at Mayo Clinic

Click here to read previous blog posts. Follow Dr. Sood on Twitter @AmitSoodMD

 

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Tags: Dr Amit Sood, Something to Think About, People in a hurry


May 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Number of disorders can trigger vertigo

By lizatorborg

medical illustration of inner ear describing vertigoDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What causes vertigo? Does having it one time mean I’m more likely to experience it again?

ANSWER: Vertigo is a sensation that either you or your surroundings, or both, are spinning or moving when they are not. Some people confuse vertigo with dizziness, but there is a difference. Dizziness typically is a feeling of being lightheaded, or it may be a loss of balance that makes you unsteady on your feet. Dizziness usually does not involve the feeling that either you or something in your environment is moving.

A number of disorders can trigger vertigo. The most common is a condition called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV. If you have BPPV once, you are at an increased risk of getting it again. In many cases, BPPV can be successfully treated.

For many adults, BPPV is the underlying source of vertigo. With BPPV, vertigo happens when you move a certain way. Sitting up, tilting your head or lying down may all trigger vertigo if you have BPPV. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: BPPV, Dix-Hallpike test, dizziness, Dr Neil Shepard, Dr Shepard, Mayo Clinic Q A, Vertigo


May 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Targeted Drug Can ‘Diminish the Suffering’ of Myelofibrosis

By Joe Dangor

CHICAGO — Use of the targeted agent pacritinib significantly reduced the symptoms and burden of advanced myelofibrosis in patients, says a Mayo Clinic researcher who co-led PERSIST-1, the worldwide phase 3 clinical trial that tested the therapy. Specifically, pacritinib substantially reduced severe enlargement of the spleen, a typical feature of advanced myelofibrosis, in more than 20 percent of patients and alleviated debilitating side effects in more than 46 percent.

Investigators further found that pacritinib could be used safely in patients with myelofibrosis who have thrombocytopenia, a life-threating loss of blood platelets that can lead to deadly bleeding. The only currently approved therapy for myelofibrosis — ruxolitinib — is not recommended in patients who have severe thrombocytopenia.

Ruben A. Mesa, M.D., chair of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, will present these results at a press conference held during the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005
Email: dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu 

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Tags: American Society of Clinical Oncology, Arizona News Release, ASCO, cancer, Dr Ruben Mesa, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, myelofibrosis, News Release, PERSIST-1


May 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Targeted Drug with Chemotherapy Combo Offers Longer Life to Patients with B-cell Cancers

By Paul Scotti

CHICAGO — Because of the significant benefit found in combining the targeted drug ibrutinib with standard chemotherapy for relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), an interim analysis has closed the international HELIOS phase III clinical trial.

Led by Mayo Clinic, researchers found that ibrutinib and chemotherapy (bendamustine and rituximab, known as BR) reduced the risk of death or cancer progression by almost 80 percent in patients with previously treated CLL or SLL, compared to use of BR alone.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Joe Dangor (on-site at ASCO), Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 651-261-9089 (cell), dangor.yusuf@mayo.edu.
Paul Scotti, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0199 (office), scotti.paul@mayo.edu.

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Tags: ASCO, Asher Chanan-Khan, CLL, Florida News Release, HELIOS study, M.D., Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic in Florida, News Release, SLL


May 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 5/29/15

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams:

  • A new study by British researchers finds women who take newer formulations of oral contraceptives may have an elevated risk of developing venous thromboembolism — or blood clots in the veins — than women who take earlier generations of birth control pills. Mayo Clinic hematology expert Dr. John Heit says the study measured the risk of blood clots in veins among women receiving different types of birth control and adds that while there is a higher chance of blood clots for women taking the newer contraceptives, the risk remains very low.

Click here to read more about birth control pills.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT 1:27] Click here for the script.

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Tags: birth control pills, Blood Clots, Contraceptives, deep venous thrombosis, Dr John Heit, Hematology, Vivien Williams