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July 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

July 4th celebration picnic table with watermelon, berries and sparkler

Celebrate July 4th with red, white and blue food

Thyroid nodules

Cholesterol: Top foods to improve your numbers

Facial fillers for wrinkles

Breast implants and cancer: Any connection?

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Tags: Breast Implants, cancer, Cholesterol, facial fillers, Thursday Consumer Health Tips, Thyroid Nodules


July 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

woman in a gym running on a treadmill exercising

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very different chronic digestive system conditions that are sometimes confused with one another. On this week's program, gastroenterologists Dr. Sunanda Kane and Dr. Yuri Saito discuss the differences between IBD and IBS, and explain how each is treated. Also on the program, Dr. Thomas Allison, director  of the Mayo Clinic Sports Cardiology Program, talks about a simple treadmill test that can help predict whether you'll live 10 years or more. And psychologist Dr. Karen Grothe has strategies for keeping the weight off after losing it.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: Inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome are both conditions from which full recovery is possible.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Click here to listen to the program on Saturday, July 4, at 9:05 a.m., and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

 

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio


July 2nd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

From A to Z, Stay Tick-Free This Summer

By April Josselyn

Tick-CoverROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic reports that in the summer months, its physicians see an increase in patients being treated, and even hospitalized, for tick-borne illnesses. In the upper Midwest, 40 percent of tick bites occur in July. However, even avid fans of the great outdoors can fully enjoy all their favorite activities without fear if they take the proper steps to protect themselves.

To protect you against tick-borne diseases, the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and its reference laboratory Mayo Medical Laboratories have developed “The ABCs of Ticks” flash cards.

“These unique online cards explain from A to Z what a person needs to know about staying safe this summer and avoiding ticks,” says Bobbi Pritt, M.D., director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic. “Each card discusses something about ticks; how to avoid them; and how to enjoy a safe, tick-free summer with your family, friends, and our furry pets.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Gina Chiri-Osmond, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Tags: anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bug spray, bull's-eye, deet, Dr Bobbi Pritt, ehrlichiosis, laboratory, Lyme disease, Mayo Medical Laboratories, Minnesota news release, Pets, Rash, rocky mountain spotted fever, summer, tick bite, zoonotic


July 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 7/1/2015

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams:

  • Avian flu outbreaks around the United States and abroad have been disastrous for many chicken farmers, and the impact is being felt across a multitude of communities. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh reminds us that the risk for human infection is extremely low.

For updates on avian flu, click here.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT 1:03] Click here for the script.

 

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Tags: avian flu, chicken, Dr Pritish Tosh, infectious diseases, Vivien Williams


July 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

5 Tips for Preventing Eye Injuries

By Micah Dorfner

African-American man with working in garage wearing eye protection goggles

FAIRMONT, Minn. — With the Fourth of July approaching and outdoor activities likely taking up much of your summer fun, it’s time to consider the importance of protecting your eyes. Eye injuries are largely preventable, but you need to be aware of risks and measures you can take to keep your eyes safe. Mayo Clinic Health System ophthalmologist Anna Kitzmann, M.D.,  shares five tips to help prevent eye injuries.

Leave fireworks to the pros

“Unfortunately, I’ve seen many severe eye injuries from fireworks. And most of these injuries resulted in permanent damage or blindness,” says Dr. Kitzmann. “In fact, a lot of people even lose their eye or eyes from a fireworks accident.”

The best method of eye injury prevention from fireworks is to leave these exploding wonders to the professionals. July 4 weekend offers many chances to see a well-orchestrated fireworks show from a safe distance. Take advantage of these opportunities rather than trying to conduct your own show.

If your family must have fireworks for the holidays, stick to sparklers, wear eye protection and make sure an adult supervises all activity. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Anna Kitzmann, Eye Injury Prevention, Fireworks, Fourth of July, Mayo Clinic Health System, News Release, Safety


July 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

One in 4 People Prescribed Opioids Progressed to Longer-Term Prescriptions

By Sharon Theimer

pain medication, pills in a bottle

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Opioid painkiller addiction and accidental overdoses have become far too common across the United States. To try to identify who is most at risk, Mayo Clinic researchers studied how many patients prescribed an opioid painkiller for the first time progressed to long-term prescriptions. The answer: 1 in 4. People with histories of tobacco use and substance abuse were likeliest to use opioid painkillers long-term.

The findings are published in the July issue of the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

While the study identified past or present nicotine use and substance abuse as top risk factors for long-term use of opioids, all patients should proceed with caution when offered opioid painkiller prescriptions, says lead author W. Michael Hooten, M.D., an anesthesiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester.

“From a patient perspective, it is important to recognize the potential risks associated with these medications. I encourage use of alternative methods to manage pain, including non-opioid analgesics or other nonmedication approaches,” Dr. Hooten says. “That reduces or even eliminates the risk of these medications transitioning to another problem that was never intended.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Sharon Theimer, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: hyperalgesia, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Minnesota news release, News Release, opioid addiction, opioid painkiller, opioid prescriptions, opioids, W Michael Hooten


June 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Partnership strives to reduce impact of chronic disease on Minnesotans

By Naomi Ogaldez

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic and the George Family Foundation are leading supporters of the newly formed Southeast Minnesota Partnership for Community-Based Health Promotion. A key aim of this partnership is to extend the care that occurs in Southeast Minnesota health systems into the communities. The partnership will focus first on ingym class of people exercising, showing the 'thumbs up' signcorporating clinical referrals of effective, community-based programs into routine primary care treatment strategies. The new program is called Living Well with Chronic Conditions (formally known as the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program).

“The goal of this partnership is to fundamentally change the way individuals and communities in Southeast Minnesota experience life with chronic health conditions,” says Aaron Leppin, M.D., a research associate in Mayo Clinic’s Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 out of every 10 deaths in the U.S. are the result of chronic disease. In Southeast Minnesota, Community Health Needs Assessments consistently identify chronic disease management as an area of priority.

Media Contacts: Colette Gallagher and Naomi Ogaldez, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Aaron Leppin, Minnesota news release, News Release


June 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: During pregnancy, stick to the basics to ensure good nutrition for baby

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’m newly pregnant and overwhelmed with food advice from my friends. Is it true that I shouldn’t eat any deli meat during my pregnancy? What about caffeine? Can it harm the baby? Are there other foods I should avoid while pregnant?pregnant woman eating healthy vegetables

ANSWER: The list of foods people think you should and shouldn’t eat while you’re pregnant can quickly become long and confusing. Although there are some specific do’s and don’ts, stick to the basics. Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet that’s low in fat and does not include alcohol is a solid way to ensure good nutrition for you and your baby.

For most people, pregnant women included, healthy eating involves plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole-grain foods and lean protein, as well as some healthy fats such as those found in fish, nuts, seeds and plant-based oils. Nutrients important for women during pregnancy include calcium and vitamin D for strong bones, folate to reduce the risk of birth defects, iron to prevent anemia and protein to help your baby grow. Getting enough fiber and fluids also is important to avoid constipation and to keep you hydrated. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Margaret Dow, fetal alcohol syndrome, Healthy Eating, listeria infection, Mayo Clinic Q A, Pregnancy


June 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic PathWays June 30: What’s the Diagnosis?

By April Josselyn

Mayo Medical Labs Pathways bannner

This week's Mayo Clinic PathWays case study is LIVE
View the case and make your diagnosis.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic PathWays in this news release.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic PathWays, Mayo Medical Laboratories, pathology


June 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

In Case You Missed the Show: #MayoClinicRadio PODCAST June 27

By Dana Sparks

Shannon O'Hara's photo and Dr. Richard Vile being interviewed on Mayo Clinic Radio
LISTEN: MayoClinicRadio 06-27-15 PODCAST

On this week's program, scientist Dr. Richard Vile describes how a teenage girl with brain cancer changed the focus of his research.  And, Dr. Robert Jenkins, a pathologist and specialist in laboratory genetics, explains new research that may lead to more effective treatments for gliomas ... a type of brain cancer that's particularly hard to treat. Also on the program, orthopedic surgeon Dr. John Sperling talks about rotator cuff injury ... what it is and how it's repaired. And, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that about 240 people go to the emergency room each day during the weeks around the Fourth of July with fireworks-related injuries. Surgeon and trauma specialist Dr. Donald Jenkins discusses the hazards of using fireworks at home.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio


June 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Headline 6/29/2015

By Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic News Network Headline with Vivien Williams:

  • Chocolate lovers, take heart. A recent study shows a higher intake of chocolate — either dark or milk chocolate — may be associated with lower cardiovascular disease and mortality. Mayo Clinic cardiologist Dr. Stephen Kopecky says chocolate contains polyphenols which are some of nature's antioxidants and have been associated with numerous health benefits.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT 1:00] Click here for the script.

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Tags: chocolate, Cholesterol, Dr. Stephen Kopecky, Heart Health, Mayo Clinic News Network Headline, Vivien Williams


June 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Transplant Programs Rank Among Best in U.S. for Survival Rates

By Lynn Closway

heart transplant surgery with Dr. Daly
PHOENIX — Mayo Clinic, as a three-site organization, remains the largest provider of solid organ transplants in the U.S. and continues to be identified as having patient and graft survival outcomes that rank among the best in the nation.

According to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), a national database of transplant statistics, Mayo Clinic’s transplant programs in Arizona, Florida and Rochester, Minn., score statistically better than expected in terms of patient and graft survivals at the reported time points of one month, one year and three years. Graft survival means that the transplanted organ is still functioning.

The lung transplant program at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus was one of two lung transplant programs in the U.S. with statistically better-than-expected outcomes for one-year patient and graft survival. Florida’s liver transplant program, with  three-year patient and graft survival rates that also are statistically better than expected, is one of only four programs meeting this criteria at that time point.

MEDIA CONTACT: Lynn Closway, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, newsbureau@mayo.edu / 507-284-5005.

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Tags: Arizona News Release, kidney transplant, News Release, transplant


June 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Keep Your Summer Safe and Injury Free + SAVING LIVES WITH GUS: Fireworks Safety

By Dana Sparks

U.S. American flag, July 4th, sparklers, fireworks
With the 4th of July holiday week coming up, experts at Mayo Clinic are offering up some injury prevention tips on some of the most common reasons that send people to the emergency department this time of year.

  • Consume alcohol in moderation. Imbibing too much alcohol can lead to questionable decision-making, slowed reflexes and false confidence – traits that are dangerous in nearly any outdoor activity during the summer months.
  • Never assume a campfire or bonfire is completely out. On more than one occasion, fire-happy campers have been known to dump gasoline or other extremely flammable liquids on fires that look like they are out or smoldering and ended up with third-degree burns. Children and adults make trips to the emergency room every summer after stepping into fire pits they thought were cool.
  • Always wear a helmet when biking, motorcycling, horseback riding or on an ATV. This is like wearing a seat belt in a car – an absolute must. Riders of all kinds can sustain serious injuries in an accident, but survival chances grow exponentially when a helmet is worn.
  • Be extra alert when operating a boat or personal watercraft.  Watch out for other boaters, water-skiers and swimmers. Every year, patients are brought to the emergency department after getting tangled up in a boat propeller. And always wear a life jacket.
  • Avoid fireworks. Even sparklers – thought to be relatively safe – can lead to blindness and serious burns. Other larger fireworks can leave users without fingers and even limbs. Hearing loss is common among fireworks users as well. Children must be closely supervised at all times around any kind of fireworks.

Journalists: The 'Saving Lives With Gus' video and sound bites with Dr. Jenkins are available in the downloads.

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Tags: Dr. Donald Jenkins, Emergency Medicine, fireworks safety, Saving Lives with Gus, summer injuries


June 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic study suggests which glioblastoma patients may benefit from drug treatment

By Kevin Punsky

Brain Cancer medical illustrationJACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Clinicians testing the drug dasatinib, approved for several blood cancers, had hoped it would slow the aggressive growth of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma; however, clinical trials to date have not found any benefit. Researchers at Mayo Clinic, who conducted one of those clinical trials, believe they know why dasatinib failed — and what to do about it.

In the online issue of Molecular Oncology, investigators report finding that dasatinib inhibits proteins that promote cancer growth as expected but also suppresses proteins that protect against cancer.

The findings suggest that pretesting patient glioblastoma biopsies will help identify who may respond well to dasatinib and who should avoid using the drug, says the study’s senior author, Panos Z. Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746, punsky.kevin@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: brain cancer, Dr Jann Sarkaria, Dr Panos Z Anastasiadis, Florida, Florida News Release, glioblastoma, Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Medical Research, News Release, Regenerative Medicine


June 29th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara

Housecall Bannercows in a corral, bovine, antibiotic resistanceTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Antibiotic resistance: Understanding the connection to antibiotic use in animals raised for food
How can treating a sick cow cause you to get an infection? See how antibiotics given to food-producing animals may affect you.

Top 5 lifestyle changes to improve your cholesterol
Taking a brisk daily walk. Eating more soluble fiber. These are just a few changes that may help improve your cholesterol numbers. What else can you do?

EXPERT ANSWERS
Lack of sleep: Can it make you sick?
Not getting enough shut-eye can affect your immune system. This can make you more likely to get sick and take longer to recover.

Vitamin B-12 injections for weight loss: Do they work?
A shot that helps you shed pounds sounds appealing, but there's no solid evidence that vitamin B-12 injections work.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.
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Tags: Addiction, antibiotic resistance, cataract surgery, Cholesterol, gourmet salt, Healthy Recipes, insomnia, intervention, Monday's Housecall, nutrition-wise blog, scleroderma, trans fats, vitamin B-12