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January 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Super Recipes for Super Bowl Weekend

By Dana Sparks

Super Bowl Sunday graphic

                       Hearty Turkey Chili                                                                      Philly Steak Sandwich
                       Black Bean Burgers                                                                      Fruit salsa -n- sweet chips

Perhaps you've heard the phrase, "stuffing 10 pounds into a 5-pound bag?" What about making a 4-pound meatloaf with only 1-pound of beef? Here's © Chef Richard's SUPER HEALTHY 4-pound "meatloaf" just in time for Super Bowl weekend. Bake at 325 degrees for about an hour. The internal temperature as checked with a meat thermometer should be 165 degrees. Enjoy!  [TRT 1:05 ] 

 

Journalists: Broadcast quality video available in the downloads. Click for more healthy recipes.

INGREDIENTS: 

1  lb. ground beef, 95% lean meat 
6  stalks of celery
1  lb. carrots
½  lb. sweet, raw onions
¾  lb. eggplant
3  cups chickpeas or garbanzo beans 
2 tsp. olive oil  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: healthy recipes, Nutritional Snacks, Super Bowl


January 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Thyroid Disease Can Diminish Quality of Life

By Micah Dorfner

illustration of normal thyroid glandMuch like motor vehicles have engines, our bodies have similar parts to help us function. The heart and brain are the big anatomy regulators, but did you know the thyroid is also a crucial driver of bodily operation? When your thyroid experiences problems, your whole body starts to feel out of sorts — and your quality of life suffers.

Knowing how your thyroid works and what signs indicate something is wrong will
help you get the care you need and enhance your livelihood. Deb Vogelsang, nurse practitioner at Mayo Clinic Health System, answers some common questions about thyroid disease.

QWhat is a thyroid?

A. A thyroid is a gland at the base of the neck. This important part of your body produces hormones that regulate blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate and weight.

Q. What are potential thyroid problems?how thyroid works illustration

A. There are four main thyroid afflictions: hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules.

While all of these conditions can be serious, each has its own symptoms and distinctions.

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Tags: cancer, Deb Vogelsang, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, Mayo Clinic Health System, thyroid gland


January 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network Highlights 1/28/15

By Dana Sparks


Mayo Clinic News Network Highlights include:

  • Sleep issues
  • Flu and sepsis

Journalists: The video is in the downloads. Click here for script.

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Tags: Flu, sepsis, Sleep, Weekly Highlights


January 28th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Receives $5.75 Million Gift for Lewy Body Dementia Research

By Kevin Punsky

This is a confocal image of a Lewy body from the brain of a patient with Lewy body dementia double stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (the enzyme that makes dopamine) and α-synuclein (the major protein constituent of Lewy bodies).

This is a confocal image of a Lewy body from the brain of a patient with Lewy body dementia double stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (the enzyme that makes dopamine) and α-synuclein (the major protein constituent of Lewy bodies).

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville, Florida, has received a $5.75 million gift from the Harry T. Mangurian Jr. Foundation in Palm Beach, Florida, to advance the study of Lewy body dementia, a deadly disease that causes a progressive decline in mental and physical abilities. The new Mayo program is one of a few in the world dedicated to finding answers and treatments for the disease.

The gift establishes the Mayo Clinic Dorothy and Harry T. Mangurian Jr. Lewy Body Dementia Program and builds on the foundation’s previous support of Mayo research to advance awareness and understanding of Lewy body dementia. It also helps support the brain bank on Mayo’s Florida campus, which includes about 1,000 donated organs of deceased patients confirmed to have had Lewy body dementia.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs,
904-953-0746  
Email:punsky.kevin@mayo.edu

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Dickson are available in the downloads.

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Tags: Alzheimer’s disease, Dr Dennis Dickson, Florida News Release, Lewy Body Dementia, Mayo Clinic, Medical Research, News Release, Parkinson's disease


January 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Safety Tips for Digging Out

By Dana Sparks

man shoveling deep snow in winter

Hospital emergency departments see an influx of weather-related injuries with each snowstorm. Mayo Clinic emergency medicine specialist David Nestler, M.D., says falls are among the most common emergencies. "The snow and ice make it easy to slip and fall. We see many, many broken bones because of that."  Weather-related vehicle accidents, heart attacks triggered while shoveling snow and exposure injuries, like frostbite, also send more people to emergency rooms.

Click on links below to see previous Mayo Clinic News Network posts:

To interview a Mayo Clinic expert about winter safety contact:
Mayo Clinic Public Affairs 507-284-5005 newsbureau@mayo.edu

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Health System, Snowstorm, Winter Safety Tips


January 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo and King-Devick Test Have Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Test

By Jim McVeigh

Phoenix, AZ — Concussions are in the national spotlight for the damage being done to student and professional athletes. Determining when an athlete should be removed from play is a major challenge in preventing injury. Athletes routinely deny symptoms.

King-Devick test logoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 1.6 and 3.8 million students have concussions every year. In an effort to bring awareness and increase concussion screening, Mayo Clinic has agreed to a licensing agreement with King-Devick Test Inc., which has developed a proven indicator of ocular motor, visual and cognitive function for concussion detection and evaluation on the sidelines of sporting events to help with the decision to sideline athletes to prevent injury.

Under the terms of the agreement, the King-Devick Concussion Screening Test will be formally recognized as the King-Devick Test In Association With Mayo Clinic. The King-Devick Test is a quick, accurate and objective concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals.

Click here to listen to audio from today's news conference.

Click here for a transcript of today's news conference.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Tags: Arizona News Release, Dr. David Dodick, King-Devick test, concussion test


January 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic and King-Devick Test Announce Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Testing

By Jim McVeigh

concussion screening test logo with sports pictures
WHAT:
  Audio news conference about an agreement between Mayo Clinic and King-Devick to bring an objective
concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals.

Click here to listen to the audio from today's news conference.

WHO:  Mayo Clinic and King-Devick
David Dodick, M.D., Mayo Clinic Neurologist, Director, Mayo Clinic Concussion Program
Steve Devick, founder and developer of the King-Devick Test
WHEN:  Tuesday, Jan. 27 8:30 a.m. (MST)
CALL-IN: Journalists can join the call at: 800-768-2481.
RSVP: Emily Blahnik at blahnik.emily@mayo.edu or 507-538-7404.

INFO: Journalists who are registered members of Mayo Clinic News Network will have access to materials under embargo at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/Journalists can register at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/request-account/. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Arizona News Release, concussion, David Dodick, King Devick, News Release


January 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q and A: Alzheimer’s can often be identified in its earliest stages

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: How soon can Alzheimer’s disease be diagnosed? What are the early symptoms to watch for?

ANSWER: There is no one test that can be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. But based on an assessment of symptoms, along with a variety of tests and exams, Alzheimer’s can often be identified in its earliest stages. illustration of healthy brain and one with Alzheimer'sSeeking medical attention as soon as Alzheimer’s symptoms become noticeable is key to a prompt diagnosis.

The most common early symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is forgetfulness. Distinguishing between memory loss that is due to aging and memory loss due to Alzheimer’s can be tricky, though.

As people get older, the number of cells, or neurons, in the brain goes down. That can make it harder to learn new things or to remember familiar words. Older adults may have difficulty coming up with names of acquaintances, for example, or they may have trouble finding reading glasses or car keys. In most cases, these memory lapses do not signal the beginning of Alzheimer’s disease. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Alzheimer's, Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Petersen, Dr. Ronald Petersen, Tuesday Q and A


January 26th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

New Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Model More Accurate Than Current Model

By Joe Dangor

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard. Results of a Mayo Clinic study comparing the new model to the current standard, the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT), are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Tags: Amy Degnim, Benign Breast Disease, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool, Dr Degnim, Journal of Clinical Oncology, M.D., Minnesota News Releases, news releases, risk prediction model


January 26th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Dana Sparks

HousecallBanner
THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIESGlasses of red wine
Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?
Can a glass of red wine with your meal really help your heart? The substance resveratrol may reduce "bad" cholesterol and more.

Cold remedies: What works, what doesn't, what can't hurt
People have been saying for centuries that chicken soup helps a cold. Does it really work? What about other remedies? Get the facts and feel better soon.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Flat stomach: Can girdles tighten abdominal muscles?
Want a flat stomach? Diet and exercise — not undergarments — are what count.

Benefits of being bilingual: Delay Alzheimer's?
Knowing at least two languages may help protect you against the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Alzheimer's, healthy recipes, Heart Disease, Monday's Housecall, Red Wine


January 26th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Precision Medicine: Mayo Clinic Expert Describes Next Steps to Help More Patients

By Sharon Theimer

Rochester, Minn. – “Precision medicine” is becoming a national catchphrase after President Obama highlighted it in his State of the Union address. CIM-Logo Center for Individualized Medicine
But what exactly is it? Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., acting director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, describes this new, rapidly advancing frontier in medicine and outlines 10 changes that would speed development and help more patients benefit from a personalized approach to health care:

What is precision medicine? In precision medicine, also called individualized medicine or personalized medicine, physicians use knowledge about a person’s personal genetic makeup to help determine the best plan for disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The mapping of the human genome in 2003 by U.S. scientists jump-started medical genomics; the Human Genome Project was an immense international collaboration that took 13 years and cost $3.8 billion. The National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute, which coordinated the project, estimates economic growth from that project at $798 billion.

"We are now poised to apply genomic technologies developed with the findings of the Human Genome Project into everyday patient care,” Dr. Weinshilboum says.

“However, if the U.S. is to remain the world leader in health care innovation and delivery, we need another national genomics effort that will accelerate scientific discovery and clinical implementation while continuing to encourage the rapid technological innovations and entrepreneurialism that have gotten us to this point."

MEDIA CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Dr. Weinshilboum or other Mayo Clinic individualized medicine experts, please contact Sam Smith or Robert Nellis in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs at 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Genetics, genomics, Human Genome, Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Minnesota news release, News Release, personalized medicine, precision medicine, Richard Weinshilboum, whole exome sequencing, whole genome sequencing


January 25th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Snowstorm Scheduled to Slam Northeast States This Week

By Dana Sparks

snowstorm, poor visibility,slick roads and lots of traffic

 

Hospital emergency departments see an influx of weather-related injuries with each snowstorm. Mayo Clinic emergency medicine specialist David Nestler, M.D., says falls are among the most common emergencies. "The snow and ice make it easy to slip and fall. We see many, many broken bones because of that."  Weather-related vehicle accidents, heart attacks triggered while shoveling snow and exposure injuries, like frostbite, also send more people to emergency rooms.

winter storm map from the Weather Channel

Courtesy: The Weather Channel

Click on links below to see previous Mayo Clinic News Network posts:

To interview a Mayo Clinic expert about winter safety contact:
Mayo Clinic Public Affairs 507-284-5005 newsbureau@mayo.edu

Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Emergency Department, frostbite, Snowstorm, winter


January 24th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Gleason score indicates grade of prostate cancer

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am 73 and just had a prostate biopsy that showed a malignant tumor with a Gleason score of 8. Is this an indication of an aggressive cancer and if so, what are my treatment options?

ANSWER: Gleason score indicates the grade of your prostate cancer. The higher the Gleason score, the more aggressive the cancer is likely to be. prostate biopsy pattern illustrationOf the factors related to prostate cancer that doctors take into consideration when deciding on treatment, Gleason score is probably the most important one. In most cases, treatment with radiation and hormonal therapy or with surgery is recommended based on a Gleason score of 8.

The Gleason score was developed in the 1960s by a pathologist named Donald Gleason. It has stood the test of time, and doctors now rely on it to predict how likely prostate cancer is to grow and spread.

For most kinds of cancer, tumor grade is determined by looking at individual cancer cells through a microscope using a high level of magnification to examine the details of those cells. Gleason score is different. With this method, a pathologist examines prostate tissue samples under a microscope using low magnification to observe the patterns of the cancer cells. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Dr Jeffrey Karnes, Dr Karnes, Gleason score, prostate biopsy, Prostate Cancer, Weekend Wellness


January 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

Mayo Clinic Radio with Dr. Tom Shives and Tracy McCray interviewing Dr. Reid-Lombardo
Does having a cancer biopsy increase the chances your cancer will spread? We’ll explore this topic with cancer
 surgeon Dr. KMarie Reid Lombardo on the next Mayo Clinic Radio. Also on Mayo Clinic Radio, we’ll talk with OB/GYN specialist Dr. Sean Dowdy about the latest advances in preventing, detecting and treating cervical cancer. Please join us.

Myth or Fact: Having a biopsy of my cancer will cause it to spread.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Click here to listen to the program on Saturday at 9:05 a.m. and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Seg January 24, 2015 (right click MP3)

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

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Tags: Cancer Biopsy, Cervical Cancer, Dr KMarie Reid Lombardo, Dr. Sean Dowdy, Mayo Clinic Radio


January 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Measles Can Almost Always be Prevented With a Vaccine

By Dana Sparks

close up of child's face with measlesUSA Today - "An outbreak of measles that began at Disneyland before Christmas is disrupting lives in six states. Arizona became the latest state to report a case of measles related to Disneyland when a woman in her 50s was diagnosed. The outbreak has spread to Utah, Washington, Colorado, Oregon and across the border to Mexico."

Measles is a childhood infection caused by a virus. Once quite common, measles can now almost always be prevented with a vaccine. Signs and symptoms of measles include cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, sore throat, fever and a red, blotchy skin rash. Also called rubeola, measles can be serious and even fatal for small children. While death rates have been falling worldwide as more children receive the measles vaccine, the disease still kills more than 100,000 people a year, most under the age of 5. Learn more:

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Tags: Infectious Diseases, measles, Vaccination



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