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August 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Greater Risk for Kidney Stones in Summer

By Dana Sparks Dana Sparks

Kidney stones affect approximately 3.8 million people in the U.S. each year and they are especially more common in the summer. The stones are described as small, hard deposits of mineral and acid salts that form when urine becomes concentrated. The minerals crystallize and stick together, forming a stone which can range in size from a grain of sand to a golf ball.medical illustration of kidneys, bladder, ureters, kidney stones

According to Mayo Clinic nephrologist William Haley, M.D., heat, humidity and lack of proper hydration all lead to a higher prevalence of kidney stones in the summer. “The main reason is due to the amount of water we take in and use. Our bodies are made up of mostly water and we use it regularly. But in the heat, we may not be drinking as much as we should, or taking in the right types of fluids, so we become dehydrated, which can lead to more stones.”

MEDIA: To interview Dr. Haley contact Cindy Weiss, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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August 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Normal pregnancy is possible despite uterine abnormalities

By lizatorborg lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am 36 and have had two miscarriages in the past six months. I went to my doctor for tests and found out that I have a double uterus. My doctor said that I should still be able to carry a baby to term and that having a double uterus isn’t necessarily the cause of the miscarriages. Is there a way to find out if the double uterus really is causing my miscarriages? When is surgery considered for someone in my situation?

sad young woman sitting by empty crib in baby nursery, miscarriageANSWER: When a woman’s uterus is shaped differently than normal, as with a double uterus, it may increase the risk of pregnancy loss. But many women who have uterine abnormalities are able to get pregnant and have a normal pregnancy and delivery. In your situation, additional tests can show the specific structure of your uterus. The results of those tests can help your doctor identify if you may need treatment such as surgery to decrease your risk of another pregnancy loss.

During a fetus’s growth and development, the uterus normally starts as two separate spaces and then they merge into one. In women who have a double uterus, the two did not merge during fetal development. Instead, they sit side-by-side. In another common situation, the two uterine cavities do join together, but development is incomplete. The two sections of the uterus are separated by a layer of tissue called a septum. This is called a septate uterus. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: double uterus, Dr Charles Coddington III, infertility, Mayo Clinic Q A, Pregnancy, septate uterus


August 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic PathWays August 4: What’s the Diagnosis?

By April Josselyn April Josselyn

Mayo Medical Labs Pathways bannner

This week's Mayo Clinic PathWays case study is LIVE
View the case and make your diagnosis.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic PathWays in this news release.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic PathWays, Mayo Medical Laboratories, pathology


August 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

In Case You Missed the Show: #MayoClinicRadio PODCAST 8/1/2015

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

Dr. John Bachman being interviewed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio PODCAST 08-01-15

On this week's program, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. Also on the program, Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being used to provide more efficient care. And psychologist and eating-disorder specialist Dr. Karen Grothe explains binge eating and how it's treated.

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio


August 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Minute 8/3/2015

By Deborah Balzer Deborah Balzer

 

In today's Mayo Clinic Minute with Vivien Williams:

Click here for more on the Alzheimer's study, here for research on concussions and here for more on strokes.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT: 1:00] Click here for the script.

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Tags: Alzheimer's, concussions, Dr Edward Laskowski, Mayo Clinic Minute, strokes, Vivien Williams


August 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites: Week of Aug. 3, 2015

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

researcher Dr. Bobbi Pritt with lab microscopeEvery week, Dr. Bobbi Pritt posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Read Dr. Pritt's blog Parasite Wonders and submit your answers, comments and questions. Enjoy science! Read more about Dr. Pritt's work.

Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer's. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients.

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Tags: Dr Bobbi Pritt, Mayo Medical Laboratories, Parasite Wonders, pathology


August 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Atlantic Council names Mayo Dr. Pierre Noel to prestigious post

By Jim McVeigh Jim McVeigh

Dr. Pierre Noel

Dr. Pierre Noel

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Pierre Noel, M.D., a bone marrow transplant surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, was recently named to the Atlantic Council, a prestigious think tank for international affairs. Dr. Noel will be a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security.

Dr. Noel is a professor of medicine and serves as the director of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program. He is an adviser to the federal government on issues pertaining to medical support to counterterrorism operations. Dr. Noel joined Mayo in 1988 and left in 2000 to serve as the chief of hematology and a senior clinician for the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, and a consultant for the U.S. Homeland and National Security Council. He rejoined Mayo Clinic in 2010.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005,newsbureau@mayo.edu

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Tags: Arizona News Release, Atlantic Council, News Release, Pierre Noel


August 3rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

Housecall BannerTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES African-American woman sleeping, napping resting on pillow
Napping: Do's and don'ts for healthy adults
Naps aren't just for kids. Catching 40 winks may help you feel more alert and improve your mood. Here's how to make the most of your snooze.

Healthy diet: Do you follow dietary guidelines?
There's a lot of nutrition advice out there. So how much protein, fat, sugar and salt are you really supposed to consume?

EXPERT ANSWERS
Weightlifting belt: Do I need one?
For most strength training enthusiasts, there's no need to invest in a weightlifting belt.

PSA levels: Can they rise after prostate removal?
If you've had surgery for an enlarged prostate, a number of factors can cause PSA levels to go up again.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: dry eyes, healthy diet, Healthy Recipes, Mayo Clinic Diet, Monday's Housecall, Naegleria fowerli, Naegleria infection, napping, nutrition-wise blog, personalized medicine, pharmacogenomics, PSA levels, weightlifting belt


August 1st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Q and A: TIA increases risk for having a stroke in the future

By lizatorborg lizatorborg

word cloud for stroke, brain, ischemic
DEAR MAYO CLINIC:
What is a “mini-stroke” and how does it differ from the stroke we typically hear about? My mother recently had a mini-stroke, but her symptoms went away. Now she seems fine. Is she at greater risk of having another stroke?

ANSWER: The condition you’re describing is called a transient ischemic attack, or TIA. Symptoms of TIA come and go and, as in your mother’s case, they don’t cause any lasting problems. But a TIA should not be ignored because it significantly increases the risk for having a stroke in the future.

There are two main kinds of stroke: ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic strokes happen when there is bleeding into the brain tissue. They are much less common than ischemic strokes. Ischemic strokes happen when a blocked artery cuts off the blood supply to the brain. This type of stroke accounts for about 85 percent of all strokes. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: diabetes, Dr. Robert Brown, High Blood Pressure, Mayo Clinic Q A, stroke, TIA, transient ischemic attack


July 31st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Something to Think About ~ Can a perfect world remain perfect?

By Dana Sparks Dana Sparks

woman holding clear glass globe representing a perfect world

Can a perfect world remain perfect?

"Our neural system isn’t adapted for a perfect world. We need the world’s imperfections. They inspire us to improve, cultivate compassion and forgiveness, and find meaning, so we could rise above human limitations. The imperfections that surround us are the cause of our happiness and growth. Accept them to work with them."  - Dr. Amit Sood

Amit Sood, M.D. is director of research in the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He also chairs the Mind-Body Medicine Initiative at Mayo Clinic

Click here to read previous blog posts. Follow Dr. Sood on Twitter @AmitSoodMD

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Tags: Alternative Medicine, Dr Amit Sood, Perfect World, Something to Think About


July 31st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Minute 7/31/2015

By Deborah Balzer Deborah Balzer

In today's Mayo Clinic Minute with Vivien Williams:

  • Treating summer colds, how the "fatherhood effect" makes new dads gain weight and researchers say losing just one night of sleep can affect your health.

Click here for more on summer health issues, here for the "fatherhood effect" study and here for the sleep study.

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. [TRT :57] Click here for the script.

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Tags: colds, Dr Vandana Bhide, Fatherhood, sleep, summer viruses, Vivien Williams, weight gain


July 31st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Part of New Clinical Trial to Treat Advanced Melanoma

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blogMayo Clinic part of new clinical trial to treat advanced melanomalab image of testing
Treating melanoma in some people can be a challenge. Now a new clinical trial is creating custom drug options.

Liver transplant
If treatments don't work for cancers of the liver or bile duct, a liver transplant may be an option. Learn how to prepare and what you can expect.

No appetite? How to get nutrition during cancer treatment
If cancer treatment leaves you without an appetite, try these tips to get the calories and nutrients you need.

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Tags: advanced melanoma, liver transplant, Living With Cancer Blog, melanoma clinical trial, nutrition during cancer treatment


July 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Radio

By Jen O'Hara Jen O

stethoscope and book binding with words health and medical, on tablePrimary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Also on the program, Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. Also, Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being used to provide more efficient care. And psychologist and eating-disorder specialist Dr. Karen Grothe explains binge eating and how it's treated.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Click here to listen to the program at 9:05 a.m. CT, Saturday, August 1, and follow #MayoClinicRadio.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

 

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Tags: binge eating, doctor shortage, doctor training, Dr Darcy Reed, Dr. John Bachman, Dr Karen Grothe, Dr Michele Halyard, Dr. Paul Takahashi, Family Medicine, geriatric medicine, house calls, Mayo Clinic Radio, Mayo Medical School, primary care


July 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Summer Health Issues: Poison Ivy, Dehydration and More…

By Vivien Williams Vivien Williams

close up of three leaf poison ivy

Enjoying summer weather and the outdoors can bring on certain health issues. Poison ivy rashes and dehydration are two common culprits. Internal medicine specialist and pediatrician at Mayo Clinic Florida Dr. Vandana Bhide says, "Everybody is outdoors and it's very easy to be exposed to poison ivy even if you don't know it. We see lots of rashes. The second thing I see is dehydration."

Dr. Bhide says to make sure you drink water, some sports drinks, even eat popsicles to stay hydrated. For poison ivy, any kind of topical agent or anti-itch agent, calamine lotion or a soothing oatmeal bath will help decrease the itch. If symptoms persist, see your health care provider.

Other common summer health issues include:

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:14] Click here for the transcript of her comments.

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Tags: dehydration, Dr Vandana Bhide, enterovirus, heat exhaustion, Heat Rash, Mayo Clinic Florida, poison ivy, Summer illnesses


July 30th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Cost-effective addition to mammography in detecting cancer in dense breast tissue

By Bob Nellis Bob Nellis

ROCHESTER, Minn. – For women with dense breast tissue, supplementing standard mammography with a new imaging technique called molecular breast imaging (MBI) can lower the cost of diagnosis of breast cancers, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine found that adding MBI to mammography of women with dense breast tissue increased the costs of diagnosis 3.2 times, compared to costs of mammography alone, and nearly quadrupled the rate of cancer detection. Because the supplemental test found more cancer, screening with a combination of mammography and MBI saved $8,254 per cancer detected.

While mammography is still the standard tool for widespread breast cancer screening, it is now known to perform less effectively in women with dense breast tissue. Both tumors and normal dense breast tissue can appear white on a mammogram, making tumors hard to detect. Nearly half of all women over age 40 have mammograms classified as “dense,” according to Carrie Hruska, Ph.D., a medical physicist in the Mayo Clinic Department of Radiology and the study’s lead author. Supplemental screening techniques like MBI address a significant need for better cancer detection methods for this patient population.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Hruska are in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bob Nellis and Shea Jennings, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Breast Cancer, Center for Individualized Medicine, Dr Carrie Hruska, Dr Deborah Rhodes, Dr Michael O'Connor, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, MBI, molecular breast imaging, Research, Rochester news release