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July 25th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Pay it Forward with Random Acts of Kindness

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Pay it forward with random acts of kindnessclose up of child's hand holding an older adult hand with kindness
Practice kindness and pass it on. You'll make someone's day, and when that person passes the kindness on, it multiplies.

Pediatric white blood cell disorders
Learn the basics about children's white blood cell disorders.

Fertility preservation: Understand your options before cancer treatment
Cancer treatment can have a major impact on fertility. Get the facts about fertility preservation options for men and women.

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July 24th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

Fresh Fruits

Diabetes diet: Should I avoid sweet fruits?

White coat hypertension: When blood pressure rises at the doctor's office

Arthritis pain: Do's and don'ts

Stopping blood loss: From the battlefield to the cornfield

Birth control pills: Harmful in early pregnancy?

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July 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network — Headlines 7/23/14

By Dana Sparks


Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines include:

  • Unruptured  brain aneurysm
  • Imaging for children
  • Functional foods improving health

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script.

 

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July 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

21st Century Cures Roundtable on Personalized Medicine

By Dana Sparks

Dr. Frank Cockerill LIVE at Capitol Hill roundtable on personalized medicine


Frank Cockerill, M.D.
, chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, is participating in a roundtable discussion hosted by the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee today, Wednesday, July 23, at 10 a.m ET.  

Click for LIVE stream.   Go to Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories for more information.

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July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Study Suggests Caffeine Intake May Worsen Menopausal Hot Flashes, Night Sweats

By Ginger Plumbo

Study also shows that caffeine may help mood and memory in perimenopausal women

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. The study also showed an association between caffeine intake and fewer problems with mood, memory and concentration in perimenopausal women, possibly because caffeine is known to enhance arousal, mood and attention. The findings of this largest study to date on caffeine and menopausal symptoms are published on the Menopause website and will also be printed in a future issue of the journal.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Ginger Plumbo, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q and A: Many conditions result in dementia, but Alzheimer’s is most common

By lizatorborg

Alzheimer's disease definition highlighted in dictionaryDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? Are they hereditary?

ANSWER: Dementia is a broad term used to describe a group of symptoms that interferes with a person's thinking and the ability to function well in day-to-day activities. Many conditions can result in dementia, but Alzheimer’s disease is, by far, the most common. Because so many factors can lead to dementia, one cannot say that dementia, the syndrome, is hereditary. Rather, subtypes of dementia (for example, Alzheimer’s disease) may have inherited components. A rare form of Alzheimer’s disease is truly inherited, but that accounts for only 1 percent of the total disease. Typical Alzheimer’s disease, however, does have a tendency to run in families, and there are genetic tendencies.

Dementia is defined by its symptoms, with memory loss being one of the most frequent. Just because a person has some memory loss, though, doesn’t necessarily mean he or she has dementia. A diagnosis of dementia typically means a person is having problems with at least two brain functions. That may include, for example, memory loss as well as impaired judgment or problems with language. These may in turn lead to difficulty performing routine tasks, such as paying bills or driving to a familiar location without getting lost. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Dana Sparks

Housecall Banner blue and white

Heart attack word cloudTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Cancer causes: Popular myths about the causes of cancer
Myths about secret cancer causes may lead you to worry about your own health and the health of your family. Before you panic, take a look at the facts.

Heart attack symptoms: Know what's a medical emergency
Besides chest pain, do you know the signs of a heart attack? Watch for these symptoms.

Carbohydrates: How carbs fit into a healthy diet
Carbohydrates have numerous health benefits. In fact, your body needs them to function. But some carbs may be better for you than others.

EXPERT ANSWERSgreen leaves of a Ginkgo tree
Ginkgo biloba: Can it prevent memory loss?
Ginkgo biloba is said to prevent memory loss, but study results suggest otherwise.

Salt craving: A symptom of Addison's disease?
Excessive salt craving may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as Addison's disease

Late-day exercise: Can it cause insomnia?
For some people, exercising within a few hours of bedtime may cause problems getting to sleep.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Widowhood may delay dementia, Mayo Clinic study says

By Jim McVeigh

handsPHOENIX — A new Mayo Clinic study suggests that the care and support family members give to elderly widows following the death of their spouse may be a factor in delaying dementia.

The study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark last week was designed to evaluate the effects of widowhood in people with mild cognitive impairment - a precursor of dementia.  The thinking had been that widowhood would accelerate the development of dementia in people with MCI but the study showed the opposite.

Mayo Clinic researchers used data on more than 3,500 people from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center database, which compiles information collected at various Alzheimer’s disease Centers in the U.S. The researchers found that of the 1,078 subjects who developed dementia, people who remained married developed dementia at a younger age than those who were widowed (83 years old versus 92 years). Read the rest of this entry »

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Four Tricks to Save Yourself from Ticks

By Dana Sparks

News from Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Summer fun often includes hiking, biking, and just enjoying the great outdoors. But hanging out in parks or walking on trails also invites ticks to hop a ride. Below are four tips from the Mayo Clinic Parasitology Laboratory for arming yourself against these unwanted visitors: 

1. Use repellants that contain 20 to 30 percent DEET or 20 percent picaridin: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., clinical microbiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, says that applying repellant to exposed skin and clothing will provide protection for several hours. “You can also wear clothing treated with permethrin to keep bugs away,” adds Dr. Pritt. 

2. Wear long sleeves and tuck pants into socks: Covering your body and sealing off “entry points” from little critters helps prevent bites. Dr. Pritt also suggests wearing light-colored clothing to make it easier to spot ticks. 

3. Avoid areas where ticks are prevalent: When hiking, stay in the middle of the trail and avoid areas with high grass or leaf litter. 

4. Check yourself carefully for ticks, removing any right away using small forceps: When you get back from a hike or picnic, make sure you check yourself carefully for ticks. “Ticks can transmit important disease-causing organisms to humans and pets,” says Dr. Pritt, “It’s vital to remove any attached ticks right away using forceps.”

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Andy Tofilon, Mayo Medical Laboratories, 507-538-5245, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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July 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: New treatments for dry eyes may help if standard treatments fail

By lizatorborg

close-up of older woman dabbing her eyes with a tissueDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What causes dry eyes? Is there an effective treatment other than constantly using eye drops to keep them moist?

ANSWER: Dry eyes happen when your eyes do not make enough tears or when those tears are poor quality. Treatment of dry eyes often includes medication, eye drops or ointment. But new treatments for a certain type of dry eyes may provide relief when standard treatments fail.

To keep your vision clear and your eyes comfortable, you need a smooth layer of tears consistently covering the surface of your eyes. The tear film has three basic components: oil, water and mucus. Problems with any of these can cause dry eyes.

Symptoms of dry eyes often include blurry vision, eye redness, sensitivity to light, and a burning, gritty or scratchy feeling in your eyes. Dry eyes may cause excessive tearing in some cases. They can make it difficult to wear contact lenses, too. Medications, age, eyelid problems, environmental factors (such as climate) and excessive eye strain can all result in dry eyes.

For some people with chronic dry eyes, the problem stems from glands in the eyelids, called the meibomian glands. Normally, these glands make oil that slows the evaporation of tears. If the glands become blocked, tears do not contain enough oil. Then the tears evaporate too quickly, and eyes become dry. This type of dry eye condition is known as evaporative dry eye. Inflammation of the eyelid skin — a disorder called ocular rosacea — can often result in blocked meibomian glands. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Trial Uses TheraSphere for The Treatment of Liver Metastases

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Trial uses TheraSphere for the treatment of liver metastasesword cloud for cancer research
TheraSphere delivers radiation through tiny glass beads — about a third of the width of a human hair — directly into liver tumors.

Positron emission tomography (PET) scan

Learn about this imaging test that can help reveal whether your cancer has spread, check whether a cancer treatment is working and find a cancer recurrence.

Managing chemotherapy side effects

Chemotherapy treatment carries with it a host of potential side effects — fatigue, hair loss and more. Learn about managing chemotherapy side effects.

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July 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Researcher to Lead National Cancer Research Statistics and Data Center

By Joe Dangor

Dr. Daniel SargentROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic announced today that Daniel Sargent, Ph.D., has been awarded a $32.7 million, five-year grant by the National Cancer Institute to lead the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology’s Statistics and Data Center. The Center will be located at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester.

“This award will allow Mayo Clinic to continue and expand our over 35-year history as a national hub for conducting cancer clinical trials,” says Dr. Sargent, a biostatistician. The Alliance Statistics and Data Center is a multi-institutional operation that involves researchers at Mayo Clinic, Duke University, Dana- Farber Cancer Center, Ohio State University, and MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology (Alliance) is a national clinical trials network sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. The Alliance consists of nearly 10,000 cancer specialists at hospitals, medical centers and community clinics across the United States and Canada. The group develops and conducts clinical trials on promising new cancer therapies, develops treatment and prevention strategies and conducts research to alleviate side effects of cancer and cancer treatments. The Alliance enrolls 3,000 to 5,000 patients annually on its studies.
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July 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

montage of Mayo Clinic Radio pictures

The next Mayo Clinic Radio will make you smile!  On Saturday, July 19, at 9 a.m. CT, Thomas Salinas, D.D.S., will join us to discuss different aspects of oral health.  We’ll talk about new ways to restore teeth and replacing missing teeth. Also on the list for discussion — the dramatic increase in oral cancers in those afflicted with HPV, how oral health impacts overall health, the affect of certain medications on oral health and the importance of oral health for aging patients.  Join us! Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment July 19, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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July 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic News Network — Headlines 7/17/14

By Dana Sparks

Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines include:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis patients with heart problems
  • Stem cell research for ALS 
  • Lung nodules

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script.

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July 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Target Field Pitch for Prevention: Raising Awareness of Cancers that Can be Defeated

By Joe Dangor

P4PWHAT: Mayo Clinic, Fight Colorectal Cancer and Ed Randall’s Fans for the Cure will encourage baseball fans to “pitch in” to prevent prostate and colorectal cancer as the Minnesota Twins begin a three-game series against the Cleveland Indians at Target Field in Minneapolis on July 21.

Pitch for Prevention is intended to raise awareness about prostate cancer and colorectal cancer prevention through an educational event for prostate cancer and colorectal cancer survivors with Mayo Clinic physicians, educational booths on Target Plaza and a champion’s march of cancer survivors onto Target Field. The Pitch for Prevention educational event will be streamed live at pitchforprevention.com.

The campaign will include a special appearance by country music star Craig Campbell, who lost his father to colorectal cancer at age 11. Losing his father at a young age inspired Campbell to become involved in the fight against colorectal cancer. He was recently named national spokesperson for Fight Colorectal Cancer.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prostate cancer is the second-leading killer of men in the U.S., and colorectal cancer is the third-leading killer of both men and women in the U.S.

WHERE: Target Field, Minneapolis.

WHEN: Monday, July 21, 2014. Educational event begins at 4 p.m. Game begins at 7:10 p.m.

WHO: Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist Paul Limburg, M.D., founder of Pitch for Prevention, Craig Campbell, country singer and national spokesman for Fight Colorectal Cancer. Eric Powell, colorectal cancer survivor, will throw out the first pitch of the game.

Dr. Limburg and Campbell will be available for interviews on July 21.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Chloe Piepho or Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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