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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Investigator to Lead Alliance Research Base for New National, Community-based Cancer Research Initiative

By Joe Dangor

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Jan Buckner, M.D., a five-year, $47.5 million grant to lead the NCI’s National Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) research base for the Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology. Dr. Buckner is deputy director for cancer practice at the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Rochester, where the Alliance research base will be located.Cancer wordsJan Buckner M.D

NCORP is a national network of cancer investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions and other organizations that provide care to diverse populations in community-based health care practices across the United States. NCORP will design and conduct trials to improve cancer prevention, cancer control, screening and post-treatment management.

The Alliance research base at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center in Minnesota will be one of seven research bases across the country that will design and conduct multicenter cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research. NCORP hubs will also provide overall administration, data management, scientific leadership and regulatory compliance for the NCORP program.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu Read the rest of this entry »

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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Two of a Kind: Abby and Belle

By Dana Sparks

'Mayo 150 years serving humanity' 150th Sesquicentennial Logo
Formerly conjoined twins, Abby and Belle were separated after a daylong operation in May 2006. All these years later the family reflects on that deep moment of trust in the Mayo Clinic team. [TRT 4:14]

Journalists: The full package is available in the downloads. Click here for transcript.

This is a special report produced for the Mayo Clinic 150th Anniversary Collection of Stories. To view other stories and learn about Mayo Clinic's sesquicentennial, please click here.

 

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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center to Offer Saturday Morning Injury Clinic

By Bryan Anderson

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center will provide a Saturday morning injury clinic for middle school, high school and college athletes injured during Friday night or Saturday morning sports activities. The clinic will be open each Saturday from Aug. 23 to Oct. 11, from 8 a.m. to noon.

FootballGrass_00010205381_SP FeatureAppointments may be scheduled by calling 507-266-9100, starting at 8 a.m. on Saturday. Walk-ins also are welcome but must arrive by 11 a.m. Appointments will receive priority.

The Saturday morning injury clinic is in the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center’s Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center location. The clinic will be staffed by a physician, physical therapist and athletic trainer. Care options may include X-rays, splinting, bracing, crutch instruction, concussion evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation exercises.

In addition to the injury clinic, Saturday sports medicine offerings include programs for hockey, running, golf, throwers, and any athlete wanting to improve athletic performance.

For more information, contact Chad Eickhoff, athletic training services coordinator, at 507-266-3461 or eickhoff.chad@mayo.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Bryan Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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August 19th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q and A: With painful bunions, try other measures before turning to surgery

By lizatorborg

bunion on foot illustrationDEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have had bunions for years, but they have not bothered me much until recently. I now have pain every day and most shoes hurt my feet. Is surgery the only option at this point? What does that involve, and can it be done on both feet at the same time, or will I need to have each foot done separately?

ANSWER: In a situation like yours, surgery could be considered. But surgery is not the only treatment for bunions. More conservative measures may help decrease your symptoms and relieve pain. If you try them and they don’t work, though, then it would be a good idea to talk with a foot surgeon about surgical options.

The structure of your feet changes over time. Sometimes these are subtle changes that you do not notice. But in other instances, the changes are more substantial. Bunions happen due to changes that force the bones of your feet out of alignment and increase the width of your foot.

When a bunion develops, your big toe actually tilts or drifts away from the midline of your body, eventually crowding the second toe. The bone that is just behind the big toe, called the first metatarsal, drifts or tilts in toward the midline of your body. As the first metatarsal tilts in, it becomes more prominent. That is the bony bump referred to as a bunion. Read the rest of this entry »

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August 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Dana Sparks

Housecall Banner blue and white

THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIESword cloud for fitness and exercise
Fitting in fitness: Finding time for physical activity
You know fitness is important, but making time to exercise can be tough. Try these tips for fitting more physical activity into your day.

Cancer prevention: 7 tips to reduce your risk
Simple lifestyle changes can make a big difference in helping prevent cancer. Find out what you can do, starting today.

Heart disease in women: Understand symptoms and risk factors
Heart disease is often thought of as a problem for men. But more women than men die of heart disease each year. Learn the risks and how to protect yourself.

EXPERT ANSWERSwhite coffee cup with steam rising
Diabetes: Does alcohol and tobacco use increase my risk?
Find out how your risk of type 2 diabetes increases with smoking and drinking.

Demyelinating disease: What causes it?
Demyelinating diseases, which include multiple sclerosis, result in neurological problems. Learn the causes.

Caffeine: Is it dehydrating or not?
Caffeinated drinks usually won't dehydrate you, but water is still your best option.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter. Read the rest of this entry »

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August 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

First in Florida to Receive National Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification

By Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic’s stroke center in Jacksonville is the first center in Florida to receive national Comprehensive Stroke Center certification, joining an elite group of centers throughout the United States that are focused on providing advanced and complex stroke care.

 

 

Centers that achieve this distinction — awarded by The Joint Commission working with the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association — are recognized as leaders that help set the national agenda in highly specialized stroke care. The Joint Commission is the nation's oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care.

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August 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: In most cases, tailbone pain goes away within a few months

By lizatorborg

older woman with lower back painDEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is there anything that can be done for a tailbone that is painful? My mother is 70 and won’t go to the doctor even though she is miserable. She said there is nothing they can do for her. Shouldn’t a doctor be consulted in this case?

ANSWER: Tailbone pain can be very uncomfortable. Fortunately, in most cases, the pain goes away on its own within a few months. During that time, there are steps your mother can take to help lessen the pain. If her tailbone pain lasts for more than two months, or if it gets worse despite home remedies, then your mother should see a doctor.

Your tailbone, or coccyx, is the bony structure at the bottom of your spine that helps to support your pelvic floor. Tailbone pain, a condition called coccydynia, is usually dull achy pain in or around the tailbone. But the pain may become sharper or more intense after sitting or standing for a long time, during sex, or with urination or a bowel movement. Read the rest of this entry »

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

social media word keyboard

 

Our next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Saturday, August 16 at 9 a.m. CT, will highlight the influence and power of social media in health care. Medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media Farris Timimi, M.D., will join us to discuss the impact of social networks on health care. Hope you'll tune in!

Myth or Fact: The main reason many physicians and hospitals give for not participating in social media is they have legal concerns.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment August 16, 2014 (right click MP3) 

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Caring Canines: Support from Four-Legged Friends

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Caring Canines Wheaten Terrier with owner at Mayo Clinic Cancer CenterCaring Canines: Receive support from a four-legged friend
With pet-assisted therapy, find out how a furry friend can provide you with love and help ease loneliness and anxiety.

Transoral robotic surgery for oral cancer
Discover how surgeons use this high-tech procedure to treat mouth and throat cancers.

Positron emission tomography (PET) scan
Learn about this imaging test that can help reveal whether your cancer has spread, check whether a cancer treatment is working and find a cancer recurrence.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center - Research
The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center with a multisite presence. 

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

BACK-TO-SCHOOL: Deciding to Stay in Sports Activities

By Dana Sparks

Obesity issues are facing our society and just when young people should be encouraged to stay active, there's some concern they're dropping out of sports. Speculation is that some kids quit because there’s too much emphasis on winning or they’re simply burning out early because of overall pressures. Vivien Williams speaks with Mayo Clinic psychologist Max Trenerry, Ph.D., about keeping youngsters thriving in, and enjoying, sports activities. [TRT 1:48]

Click here for script.

Journalists: The video report and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. News Network pkgs. can be edited into vo/sots and incorporated in your reporting.  *Note: This report originally aired Sept. 2012 

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Understanding Headache Types is Key to Treatment

By Micah Dorfner

man pressing his hands to his temples because of a headache.

We have all experienced the annoying, relentless and throbbing pain associated with a headache. They can slow us down or even bring us to a complete stop. However, did you know that there are several different types of headaches, and knowing the type you've got can be the first step in effectively treating it?

Mayo Clinic Health System nurse practitioner Erin Pokorny takes a look at different types of headaches and shares what you can do to fight them.

  • Tension-type headaches: These are considered to be the most common types of headaches. They are often described as dull and achy and are often brought on by stress, neck pain, missing meals and a variety of other things. Treatment options: Tension-type headaches can often be treated by over-the-counter medication, such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen. You may also want to try alternative treatments including meditation, relaxation training and massage.
  • Migraines: We've all heard about migraines, and we know that they’re not to be taken lightly. The pain associated with migraines is often described as throbbing and severe. Migraines are often associated with nausea, vomiting or increased sensitivity to light and sound. Pain may worsen with increased activity. Untreated, migraines can typically last anywhere from 4 to 72 hours. Treatment options: If you know the triggers for your migraines, make sure to avoid these known causes. Over-the-counter medication can help. Other treatment options include prescription medications; rest in a quiet, dark room; or a hot/cold compress to the head or neck.

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August 15th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Task Force Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline

By Traci Klein

A Mayo Clinic task force challenges some recommendations in the updated guideline for cholesterol treatment unveiled by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) in 2013. The task force concludes, based on current evidence, that not all patients encouraged to take cholesterol-lowering medications, such as statins, may benefit from them and that the guideline missed some important conditions that might benefit from medication.

Furthermore, the task force believes an emphasis needs to be placed on an individualized treatment approach with each patient and exercising shared decision-making.

heart stethoscopeRecommendations of the task force, made up of Mayo Clinic experts in cardiology, endocrinology and preventive medicine, with no conflicts of interest or links to the drug industry, will be published Aug. 14 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. An editorial will accompany the paper. Mayo Clinic physicians are adopting the task force’s guideline.

“The ACC/AHA cholesterol guideline was last updated in 2001, so it needed to be updated. We agree with many points of the guideline, but there are some key areas where we do not completely agree or we wanted to expand and provide more guidance,” says Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D., task force chairman and director of preventive cardiology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Kullo and Dr. Lopez-Jimenez are available in the downloads, as well as animations of statins' effects in the bloodstream and carotid artery plaque formation

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August 14th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

BACK-TO-SCHOOL: Developing Good Dental Hygiene

By Dana Sparks

young African-American girl brushing her teeth

Developing good dental hygiene is especially important for children. Thomas Salinas, D.D.S., says, "Regular dental exams are an important part of preventive health care. Students who brush their teeth, gums and tongue twice per day can reduce their risk of infection." He recommends students practice healthy dental habits daily and visit the dentist for a cleaning twice a year.

On Mayo Clinic Radio Dr. Salinas has discussed dental health topics, from cavities and canker sores to larger issues such as cleft palates or implants. During the radio show listeners tweeted specific questions and below are Dr. Salinas' answers.

[You can listen to a podcast of the show Mayo Clinic Radio – Full Show 8-3-2013]

Q: Is brushing twice important?  Can we use oral chemicals to rinse mouth at night?
A:  Assuming twice a day brushing (YES!) and you can use chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium before bed.

Q: What is the most effective toothpaste?
A: All fluoridated toothpastes with ADA seal are effective.

Q: Won't 4 minutes of brushing wear down enamel over time?
A:  Four minutes of brushing will not appreciably wear down enamel.

Q: How important is the direction you brush?  Which area of mouth needs more attention?
A:  Angle brush 45 degrees to gum with small circular strokes. Spend slightly more time on back teeth.
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August 14th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Researchers develop strategy to combat genetic ALS, FTD

By Kevin Punsky

Potential biomarker discovered to monitor disease progression, therapy

The C9ORF72 mutation leads to the production of abnormal proteins, referred to as “c9RAN proteins”, that accumulate in neurons and form inclusions. Depicted here are inclusions composed of poly(GP) c9RAN proteins in the cerebellum of a c9FTD/ALS case. In our study, we show that these poly(GP) proteins are also detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of c9ALS patients, suggesting that poly(GP) proteins in CSF may eventually provide a direct means to measure a patient’s response to experimental drugs that block c9RAN protein production.

The C9ORF72 mutation leads to the production of abnormal proteins, referred to as “c9RAN proteins”, that accumulate in neurons and form inclusions. Depicted here are inclusions composed of poly(GP) c9RAN proteins in the cerebellum of a c9FTD/ALS case. In our study, we show that these poly(GP) proteins are also detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of c9ALS patients, suggesting that poly(GP) proteins in CSF may eventually provide a direct means to measure a patient’s response to experimental drugs that block c9RAN protein production.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In the Aug. 14 issue of Neuron, they also report discovery of a potential biomarker to track disease progression and the efficacy of therapies.

The scientists developed a small-molecule drug compound to prevent abnormal cellular processes caused by a mutation in the C9ORF72 gene. The findings come on the heels of previous discoveries by Mayo investigators that the C9ORF72 mutation produces an unusual repetitive genetic sequence that causes the buildup of abnormal RNA in brain cells and spinal cord.

While toxic protein clumps have long been implicated in neurodegeneration, this new strategy takes aim at abnormal RNA, which forms before toxic proteins in C9ORF72-related disorders (c9FTD/ALS). “Our study shows that toxic RNA produced in people with the c9FTD/ALS mutation is indeed a viable drug target,” says the study’s co-senior investigator, Leonard Petrucelli, Ph.D., a molecular neuroscientist at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

The compound, which was tested in cell culture models of c9FTD/ALS, bound to and blocked RNA’s ability to interact with other key proteins, thereby preventing the formation of toxic RNA clumps and “c9RAN proteins” that results from a process called repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation.

The researchers also discovered that c9RAN proteins produced by the abnormal RNA can be measured in the spinal fluid of ALS patients. They are now evaluating whether these proteins are also present in spinal fluid of patients diagnosed with FTD. Although ALS primarily affects motor neurons leading to impaired mobility, speech, swallowing, and respiratory function and FTD affects brain regions that support higher cognitive function, some patients have symptoms of both disorders.

“Development of a readily accessible biomarker for the c9FTD/ALS mutation may aid not only diagnosis of these disorders and allow for tracking disease course in patients, but it could provide a more direct way to evaluate the response to experimental treatments,” says co-author Kevin Boylan, M.D., medical director of the Mayo Jacksonville ALS Center, the only ALS Certified Center of Excellence in Florida. Read the rest of this entry »

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August 14th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Minor Traffic Disruptions for The Mayo Clinic Healthy Human Race Weekend

By Bryan Anderson

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic Healthy Human Race, a weekend of health and wellness is scheduled for Aug. 22–24, 2014. The race, one of Mayo Clinic’s sesquicentennial events, is organized by the City of Rochester, Rochester Track Club and Mayo Clinic. To provide a safe environment for participants and spectators, there will be minor traffic disruptions and road closures in Rochester. The following roads and intersections will have short-term closures during the weekend: Saturday, Aug. 23 Read the rest of this entry »

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