Results for "migraine"

See results for pages, or members.

Search for keyword "migraine" : Clear Search

juliejmason

Wed, May 4 at 3:00pm EDT by @juliejmason · View  

$7 Million Research Funding Award for Migraine Research

Mayo Clinic Phoenix

PHOENIX — A Mayo Clinic research team, led by neurologists Todd Schwedt, M.D. and David Dodick, M.D., has been approved for $7 million in funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to study migraine treatment strategies.

The five-year study, “Determining the Optimal Treatment Strategy for Patients Who Have Chronic Migraine With Medication Overuse,” will compare two current strategies for treating patients who have chronic migraine.

“For the first time, we will be able to directly compare two commonly used treatment strategies for those with chronic migraine and medication overuse. The results will help determine the optimal treatment strategy for patients with this common and disabling condition,” says Dr. Schwedt, adding that the trial is expected to begin later in 2016 and is expected to involve 1,280 enrolled patients.

Approximately 36 million people in the U.S. suffer from migraines and three percent of people (or roughly 10 million) suffer from chronic migraine, according to the American Migraine Foundation. Chronic migraine is defined as having at least 15 days of headache per month, including at least eight days per month of migraine.

About half of chronic migraine sufferers take medication to stop an attack too frequently, which could lead to medication overuse. Medication overuse can lead to more frequent migraines and migraines that are less responsive to other types of treatments. Mayo Clinic’s study will research the effects of immediate discontinuation of the overused medication plus treatment with migraine prophylactic therapy versus migraine prophylactic therapy without immediate discontinuation of the overused medication.

MEDIA CONTACT: Julie Janovsky-Mason, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-6173, [email protected]

Dr. Schwedt’s study was selected for funding through PCORI’s Pragmatic Clinical Studies Initiative, an effort to produce results that are broadly applicable to a diverse range of patients and care situations, and can be more quickly taken up in clinical practice.

“This project was selected for PCORI funding not only for its scientific merit and commitment to engaging patients and other health care stakeholders in a major study conducted in real-world settings, but also for its potential to answer an important question about migraines and fill a crucial evidence gap,” says Joe Selby, M.D., MPH, executive director, PCORI. “We look forward to following the study’s progress and working with Mayo Clinic to share its results.”

Mayo Clinic’s award has been approved pending completion of a business and programmatic review by PCORI staff and issuance of a formal award contract.


About PCORI
PCORI is an independent, nonprofit organization authorized by Congress in 2010. Its mission is to fund research that will provide patients, their caregivers and clinicians with the evidence-based information needed to make better-informed health care decisions. For more information about PCORI’s funding, visit http://www.pcori.org.

###

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

Login here to comment.
lizatorborg

Sat, Mar 19 at 3:00pm EDT by @lizatorborg · View  

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Botox a Treatment for Chronic Migraines, But Not a Cure

a man with eyes shut, grimacing and holding his temples

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is it safe to use Botox injections to treat chronic headache? How does it work, and would I need to have regular treatments? Do patients who use Botox as treatment need to be on other headache medication, too?

ANSWER: Onabotulinum toxin A, or Botox, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for chronic migraine headaches. It is not a cure. People who receive Botox for headaches usually get the treatment about every three months. For some, that is all they need to keep their headaches under control. For others, additional medication or other headache treatment is necessary.

Botox is a medication that uses a form of botulinum toxin to paralyze muscle activity temporarily. Best known for its ability to reduce the appearance of facial wrinkles, Botox also has been shown to help prevent chronic migraine headaches in some people. It’s used mainly for those who have headaches more than 15 days a month.

Since 2002, doctors at Mayo Clinic have treated thousands of patients with chronic migraine effectively and safely using Botox. The medication typically is injected into muscles of the forehead, scalp, neck and shoulders.

The specific details of how Botox works to prevent headaches are not known. But, it’s likely that the injected Botox is taken up by pain receptors in the muscles’ nerves. The medication then deactivates those pain receptors and blocks pain signals that the nerves send to the brain.

The pain doesn’t go away permanently, however. After several months, the nerves sprout new pain fibers, and the headaches tend to return. The Botox effect usually lasts about two-and-a-half months. Because injections are repeated no sooner than every three months, some people need other headache treatment for the last two weeks of a Botox cycle.

Providing Botox treatment for headaches every three months is a national standard, as recommended by the American Headache Society. The treatments are not given more often due to a small possibility that, if you receive Botox more frequently, your body might build up antibodies to botulinum toxin. Those antibodies could, in theory, prevent Botox from working with future injections.

For many people, treatment with Botox alone is sufficient to control their chronic headaches. However, some do require other medications in addition to the Botox to prevent migraine attacks. They may include cardiovascular drugs, such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers, certain antidepressants and some anti-seizure medications, among others. Medications taken at the time of a migraine headache also can be very useful.

The most common side effects of Botox injections include swelling or bruising at the injection sites. Uncommonly, the medication may spread into nearby tissues and cause problems such as a drooping eyelid, eyebrows that look out of place, dry eyes or excessive eye tearing. This tends to happen more in people who already have some eye drooping or are more sensitive to botulinum toxin. Sometimes changing the injections to a slightly different location can reduce this side effect.

Although very rare, there is a possibility that the effect of botulinum toxin may spread to other parts of the body and cause symptoms, such as muscle weakness, vision problems, trouble speaking or swallowing, or difficulty breathing. Doctors generally recommend against using Botox if you are pregnant or breast-feeding, because the medication’s effects on a fetus are not known.

Botox injections are very expensive. They cost several thousand dollars per set of injections. Many insurance companies will cover the injections if a patient meets criteria for chronic migraine headache: For at least three months, a person must have headache occurring on 15 or more days per month that has the features of migraine on at least eight days per month.

Botox must be used only under a doctor’s care. Botox can be dangerous if it’s given incorrectly. Ask for a referral from your primary care doctor, or look for a doctor who specializes in chronic headaches and who has experience administering Botox treatments. A skilled and properly trained doctor can discuss the procedure with you in detail and can help you decide if it fits your needs. Dr. J.D. Bartleson, Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

 

drog

drog responded Sun, Mar 20 at 4:31pm EDT · View

How is the injection administered for headaches ?

Login here to comment.
danasparks

Mar 28, 2015 by @danasparks · View  

“What is a migraine headache?”

young woman with severe headache or migraine

Lake City, Minn. - Migraine is three times more common in women than in men and affects more than 10 percent of people worldwide, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Mayo Clinic Health System Family Medicine physician Rachel Batdorf, M.D., says, "Although any head pain can be miserable, migraines are often disabling."  In about 15 percent of cases, these painful headaches are preceded by a sensory warning sign (aura), such as flashes of light, blind spots or tingling in your arm or leg. Migraines are also often accompanied by other symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Migraine pain can be excruciating and may incapacitate you for hours or even days. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
danasparks

Aug 28, 2013 by @danasparks · View  

It's TIME for a #migrainechat

 

Man in blue shirt and striped tie with glasses holding his head with both hands like he has a severe headache

 DO YOU HAVE MIGRAINES OR KNOW SOMEONE WHO DOES?

 Join @TIME's @AliceParkNY for a #migrainechat - Thursday Aug. 29th, 1 to 2 p.m. ET

Mayo Clinic neurologist @daviddodick is participating, along with specialists from other medical institutions, the @AANPublic and the @ahsheadache.  

Topics will include:  

  • Long-term effects of migraines
  • How migraines effect social life, job and stress
  • Difference between headaches and migraines and different types of migraines
  • Who gets them and what are the triggers
  • Treatments and how to prevent
  • New research

Never participated in a chat before, or want tips on how to participate effectively? Watch this video. Questions? E-mail Nick Hanson at [email protected].

Login here to comment.

Aug 28, 2013 by @ · View  

Kids and Migraines: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Kenneth Mack addresses migraine headache in kids.

To listen, click the link below.

Kids and Migraines

Login here to comment.
danasparks

Jul 16, 2013 by @danasparks · View  

TUESDAY Q & A: Lifestyle changes may help reduce how often migraine headaches occur

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’m a 38-year-old woman, and I get migraine headaches occasionally, usually one every few months. I have a hard time functioning when I have a migraine. I don’t want to take medication for this problem if I don’t have to. Are there ways to prevent or treat migraine headaches without medication?

ANSWER: Even if you don’t get them very often, migraine headaches can have a big impact on your life. A number of lifestyle changes may help reduce how often you get migraine. But if they continue, talk with your doctor about other treatment options.

Migraine headaches involve moderate to severe pain that is often throbbing and typically affects one side of the head. The pain usually gets worse with exertion such as climbing stairs. Additional symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound, also accompany a migraine attack.
[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.
ddouda

Jun 26, 2013 by @ddouda · View  

Mayo Clinic Headache Expert Launches Migraine Campaign on TODAY Show

Mayo Clinic neurologist David Dodick, M.D., officially launched the 36 Million Migraine Campaign. It's named for the estimated 36 million Americans afflicted with chronic migraine headache pain. Dr. Dodick says if the campaign can raise one dollar for each of those people it would triple the amount of funding the federal government provides annually for migraine research. He announced details of the public awareness effort Thursday morning on NBC's Today Show.

Dr. Dodick is Chair of the American Migraine Foundation and the chair of Mayo Clinic's Headache Program in Phoenix, Arizona. Dodick says, according the World Health Organization, migraine headache is the third most common medical problem on the planet. It is also the 4th most disabling condition among women in the United States.

Dr. Dodick says money raised by the campaign will be spent directly on finding better treatments and potential cures for migraine headaches, which often have a genetic link .

Here's a link to the show.

Journalists wishing to arrange interviews with Dr. Dodick may contact Jim McVeigh at Mayo Clinic Public Affairs by calling 480-301-4222. Journalists may also use any part of the online video interview with Dr. Dodick as needed.

Login here to comment.
ddouda

Jun 26, 2013 by @ddouda · View  

Mayo Clinic Headache Expert Launches Migraine Campaign on TODAY Show

Mayo Clinic neurologist David Dodick, M.D., officially launched the 36 Million Migraine Campaign. It's named for the estimated 36 million Americans afflicted with chronic migraine headache pain. Dr. Dodick says if the campaign can raise one dollar for each of those people it would triple the amount of funding the federal government provides annually for migraine research. He announced details of the public awareness effort Thursday morning on NBC's Today Show.

Dr. Dodick is Chair of the American Migraine Foundation and the chair of Mayo Clinic's Headache Program in Phoenix, Arizona. Dodick says, according the World Health Organization, migraine headache is the third most common medical problem on the planet. It is also the 4th most disabling condition among women in the United States.

Dr. Dodick says money raised by the campaign will be spent directly on finding better treatments and potential cures for migraine headaches, which often have a genetic link .

Here's a link to the show.

Journalists wishing to arrange interviews with Dr. Dodick may contact Jim McVeigh at Mayo Clinic Public Affairs by calling 480-301-4222. Journalists may also use any part of the online video interview with Dr. Dodick as needed.

Login here to comment.

Apr 1, 2011 by @ · View  

Migraines and Vertigo

In this Medical Edge Radio episode, we look at the association between vertigo and migraines with Mayo Clinic Dr. Scott Eggers.

To listen, click the link below.

Migraine and Vertigo

Login here to comment.
shawnbishop

Feb 22, 2011 by @shawnbishop · View  

Complex Migraine

More than 28 million Americans — three times more women than men — suffer from migraine, a type of headache that's often severe. Although any head pain can be miserable, migraines are often disabling. With a "complex migraine" symptoms can include weakness, loss of vision, or difficulty speaking in addition to a headache – often mimicking a stroke.
In the video below David Dodick, M.D., neurologist, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains the symptoms, triggers and treatment for complex migraines. A nationally recognized expert on headaches, Dr. Dodick is the president of the American Headache Society, Editor-in-Chief of Cephalalgia, Director and Founder of the Headache Program and Headache Fellowship Program at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. He is also the Medical Director of the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Concussion Program.

Login here to comment.

Jan 28, 2011 by @ · View  

Preventing Menstrual Migraine

In this Medical Edge Radio episode, Mayo Clinic Dr. Beverly Tozertalks about menstrual migrainesand how to prevent them.

To listen, click the link below.

Preventing Menstrual Migraine

Login here to comment.

Dec 30, 2010 by @ · View  

Treating Menstrual Migraine

In this Medical Edge Radio episode, Mayo Clinic Dr. Beverly Tozer migraine headaches specific to women.

To listen, click the link below.

Treating Menstural Migraines

Login here to comment.

Dec 8, 2010 by @ · View  

Chronic Migraine

In this Medical Edge Radio episode, Mayo Clinic neurologist, Dr. David Dodick describes chronic migraine.

To listen, click the link below.

Chronic Migraine

Login here to comment.

Nov 11, 2010 by @ · View  

Menstrual Migraine vs Typical Migraine

In this Medical Edge episode, Mayo Clinic Dr. Beverly Tozer explains the difference between typical and menstrual migraines.

To listen, click the link below.

Menstrual Migraine vs Typical Migraine

Login here to comment.

Oct 11, 2010 by @ · View  

What are Menstrual Migraines

In this Medical Edge Radio Episode, Mayo Clinic Dr. Beverly Tozer explains menstrual migraines.

To listen, click the link below.

What are Menstural Migraines

Login here to comment.

Jul 23, 2010 by @ · View  

Migraines and Vertigo

Vertigo. It feels like the room is spinning around you. Many bouts of vertigo are caused by crystals in your inner ear that come loose. But for some vertigo sufferers, the dizziness happens thanks to migraine, the same condition that can cause severe headaches.

Login here to comment.

Jun 15, 2010 by @ · View  

Menstrual Migraines

In this Medical Edge episode, Mayo Clinic Dr. Richa Sood describes a form of migraine distinctive to women.

To listen, click the link below.

Menstrual Migraine

Login here to comment.

Mar 19, 2010 by @ · View  

Kids and Migraines

In this Medical Edge Segment, we find out from Mayo Clinic Neurologist, Dr. Kenneth Mack, that kids and migraines go together more than you might think.

To listen, click the link below.

Kids and Migraines

Login here to comment.

Jan 30, 2009 by @ · View  

Magnets for Migraines

Ask anyone who gets them and they'll tell you, migraine headaches can be a real pain!  About 30-million Americans suffer from migraine headaches and while medications help many people, not everyone responds the same way.  Plus, medications can have side effects.  Now, doctors at Mayo Clinic are studying the use of electomagnetics as a treatment to ease a migraine attack.

Login here to comment.