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lizatorborg (@lizatorborg) posted · Sat, Nov 22 6:00am · View  

Weekend Wellness: Tracking headaches may help teen see patterns, avoid triggers

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My daughter, 16, has had headaches off and on for the past year. Ibuprofen seems to help, and she says the headaches are not severe. But I am concerned that they are so frequent. What could be the cause of recurring headaches in teens? young teenaged woman with migraine or tension headache

ANSWER: Headaches in teens are common. In most cases, they are not symptoms of a larger medical problem. But when headaches continue, it is a good idea to have them evaluated. There also are steps to take at home that may help reduce headaches.

There are many kinds of headaches. Two of the most common are tension headaches and migraine headaches. Tension headaches are often described as feeling like a tight band around the head. A migraine headache usually causes intense throbbing on one side of the head. It can be accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound. [...]

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Dana Sparks (@danasparks) posted · Thu, Nov 20 5:00pm · View  

Signs and Symptoms of Pertussis

ZUMBROTA, Minn. — Symptoms of an ordinary common cold are hard not to miss. But could it be worse? Mayo Clinic Health System has diagnosed several confirmed cases of pertussis, also commonly known as whooping cough.

Family medicine physician at Mayo Clinic Health System – Red Wing in Zumbrota, Elizabeth Cozine, M.D. has seen patients present with symptoms. “Children and adults alike can contract whooping cough,” she says. “Yet, a simple vaccination could have prevented many of these cases.” Whooping cough can take one to three weeks for signs and symptoms to appear. They're usually mild at first and resemble those of a common cold:

  • Runny nose
  • Nasal congestion
  • Sneezing
  • Red, watery eyes
  • A mild fever
  • Dry cough

Journalists: Video of baby coughing is available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kristy Jacobson, Mayo Clinic Health System Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, Email:  jacobson.kristy@mayo.edu [...]

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Karl W Oestreich (@KarlWOestreich) posted · Fri, Nov 14 4:08pm · View  

Mayo Clinic Trustees Welcome New Board Member

Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D.

Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees welcomed Mary Sue Coleman, Ph.D., as a new public member at its quarterly meeting today.

Dr. Coleman is president emeritus of the University of Michigan, (U-M) an institution she led for 12 years before retiring in July 2014. Time magazine named her one of the nation’s “10 best college presidents,” and the American Council on Education honored her with its Lifetime Achievement Award. She previously was president of the University of Iowa.

As University of Michigan president, Dr. Coleman unveiled several major initiatives designed to impact on future generations of students, the intellectual life of the campus, and society at large. The initiatives focused on the interdisciplinary richness of the U-M, student residential life, the economic vitality of the state and nation, global engagement and the value of innovation and creativity. President Obama chose Dr. Coleman to help launch the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership, a national effort bringing together industry, universities and the federal government.

Click here for a bio of Dr. Mary Sue Coleman.

MEDIA CONTACT: Karl Oestreich, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu.

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Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Mon, Nov 10 9:00am · View  

Mayo Clinic Researchers Identify First Steps in Formation of Pancreatic Cancer

Shown is a region of a pancreas with preneoplastic lesions. Red labeling indicates macrophages, green labeling indicates pancreatic acinar cells that dedifferentiate, and grey labeling indicates further progressed pancreatic lesions.

Shown is a region of a pancreas with preneoplastic lesions. Red labeling indicates macrophages, green labeling indicates pancreatic acinar cells that dedifferentiate, and grey labeling indicates further progressed pancreatic lesions.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Researchers at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Jacksonville say they have identified first steps in the origin of pancreatic cancer and that their findings suggest preventive strategies to explore.

In an online issue of Cancer Discovery, the scientists described the molecular steps necessary for acinar cells in the pancreas — the cells that release digestive enzymes — to become precancerous lesions. Some of these lesions can then morph into cancer.

“Pancreatic cancer develops from these lesions, so if we understand how these lesions come about, we may be able to stop the cancer train altogether,” says the study’s lead investigator, Peter Storz, Ph.D., a cancer biologist.

he need for new treatment and prevention strategies is pressing, Dr. Storz says. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human cancers — symptoms do not occur until the cancer is well advanced. One-year survival after diagnosis is only 20 percent. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in this country.

The scientists studied pancreatic cells with Kras genetic mutations. Kras produces a protein that regulates cell division, and the gene is often mutated in many cancers. More than 95 percent of pancreatic cancer cases have a Kras mutation.

The researchers detailed the steps that led acinar cells with Kras mutations to transform into duct-like cells with stem cell-like properties. Stem cells, which can divide at will, are also often implicated in cancer.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746.
Email: punsky.kevin@mayo.edu [...]

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lizatorborg (@lizatorborg) posted · Sat, Nov 8 6:00am · View  

Weekend Wellness: Children can get hand-foot-and-mouth disease more than once

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What are the best ways to treat a toddler who has hand-foot-and-mouth disease? Does she need to be seen by a doctor? Does having it once mean she will not get it again?illustration of little boy with hand foot and mouth disease

ANSWER: Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is caused by a virus. It usually leads to mild illness and discomfort that does not require any specific treatment. You should contact your doctor, however, if your child’s symptoms are persistent or if her symptoms get worse. Although they do build up immunity to it over time, children can get hand-foot-and-mouth disease more than once.

Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is common in young children, most often in kids younger than 5. Children who go to child care centers are at higher risk for the condition than others because hand-foot-and-mouth disease spreads by person-to-person contact.

Hand-food-and-mouth disease is most often caused by a coxsackievirus. A fever is usually the first sign of the illness. Other symptoms appear within a few days. They include a sore throat and blisters or sores on the tongue, gums, back of the throat and inside of the cheeks. Blister-like lesions that are red to gray-white usually appear on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. In some cases, a red rash also may develop on the thighs, buttocks and groin. Children affected by this disorder may have a general feeling of illness and lose their appetite. [...]

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Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Tue, Oct 28 10:29am · View  

Baby Boomers and Scoliosis: Osteoporosis Is Risk Factor

ex-ray scan showing scoliosis ROCHESTER, Minn. — For many adults, the word scoliosis conjures up childhood memories of lining up in gym class for an examination by the school nurse. But scoliosis isn't just a pediatric condition. Curvature of the spine can develop in adults too, and the osteoporosis that can accompany menopause is a risk factor. Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon Paul Huddleston, M.D., explains how scoliosis develops, prevention and treatment options and a trend he is seeing in Baby Boomer women.

What is scoliosis? Scoliosis is a misshaping of the spine as seen from the front — where the spine seems shifted  right or left — or from a side view, where the spine is bent too far forward or backward, or a combination of the two. It doesn’t always cause pain: Schools started screening in elementary school or junior high in part because many children and their parents didn’t know the children had it, Dr. Huddleston says.

To arrange an interview with Dr. Huddleston, please contact Sharon Theimer in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs at 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu.  

Journalists: Sound bites with Dr. Huddleston are available in the downloads.    

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lizatorborg (@lizatorborg) posted · Tue, Oct 21 6:00am · View  

Tuesday Q and A: For most, enterovirus D68 causes only mild symptoms

shutterstock_142939915DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Why is it that children are the ones most affected by the enterovirus? I have read that it starts with mild cold symptoms, so how will I know when it’s time to see a doctor? What symptoms should I look for in my children?

ANSWER: There are many forms of enteroviruses. The one making headlines now is called enterovirus D68. This virus most often affects children and teens because their bodies have not built up immunity to it yet. In most cases, enterovirus D68 causes only mild symptoms. But it can become severe in some people. If your child has severe cold symptoms, or if symptoms get progressively worse, make an appointment to see your doctor. If a child has problems breathing, seek medical care right away.

Enteroviruses can cause a wide range of infections, depending on the strain of the virus that is involved. Some can be very serious, such as the enterovirus strain that leads to viral meningitis, while others tend to be only a nuisance, such as those that cause the common cold. [...]

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Kelley Luckstein (@KelleyLuckstein) posted · Fri, Oct 10 1:04pm · View  

Mayo Clinic and Rochester Downtown Alliance to Host U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree

Peace, Joy and Health: Rochester’s Capitol Christmas Tree Celebration

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic and the Rochester Downtown Alliance are teaming up to host the nation’s U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree this November. For the past 50 years, a beautiful evergreen tree has appeared on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol during the holiday season. The U.S. Forest Service, in collaboration with Choose Outdoors and the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, will bring this special tree from Minnesota to Washington. It will make nearly 30 community stops along the way, including the Rochester Peace Plaza on Friday, Nov. 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be free and the public is welcome.

Here is a video of the lighting of the 2013 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree (Source: U.S. Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture)

As part of the upcoming celebration, children from Civic League Day Nursery and students from Mayo High School participated in a tree planting in front of Mayo Clinic's Mayo Building this week during Mayo's Heritage Days festivities. The students also decorated the tree with ornaments made from local children.

“The last time the Capitol Christmas Tree came from a forest in Minnesota was 1992 so this is a special event,” says Jane Matsumoto, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, one of the event organizers. “The visit of the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree is an opportunity to highlight the wonderful forests and the Native American heritage of Minnesota. It is also a time for our community to celebrate joy, peace and health, the theme of the Rochester event. Over 1,000 ornaments were made by Rochester and Winona school children earlier this fall and these have already been shipped to Washington D.C., to be hung on the tree when it arrives.”

Media Contacts:

Laura Archbold, Encore Public Relations, 507-202-2652, laura@encorepublicrelations.com
Kelley Luckstein, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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