Mayo Clinic News Network

News Resources

Search the site using the below form:


Results for "school"

See results for pages, or members.

Search for keyword "school" : Clear Search

Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Mon, Jan 26 6:03pm · View  

Mayo and King-Devick Test Have Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Test

Phoenix, AZ — Concussions are in the national spotlight for the damage being done to student and professional athletes. Determining when an athlete should be removed from play is a major challenge in preventing injury. Athletes routinely deny symptoms.

King-Devick test logoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that between 1.6 and 3.8 million students have concussions every year. In an effort to bring awareness and increase concussion screening, Mayo Clinic has agreed to a licensing agreement with King-Devick Test Inc., which has developed a proven indicator of ocular motor, visual and cognitive function for concussion detection and evaluation on the sidelines of sporting events to help with the decision to sideline athletes to prevent injury.

Under the terms of the agreement, the King-Devick Concussion Screening Test will be formally recognized as the King-Devick Test In Association With Mayo Clinic. The King-Devick Test is a quick, accurate and objective concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals.

Click here to listen to audio from today's news conference.

Click here for a transcript of today's news conference.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Jim McVeigh (@m075841) posted · Mon, Jan 26 5:28pm · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic and King-Devick Test Announce Licensing Agreement for Sideline Concussion Testing

concussion screening test logo with sports pictures
WHAT:
  Audio news conference about an agreement between Mayo Clinic and King-Devick to bring an objective
concussion screening tool that can be administered on the sidelines by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, school nurses and medical professionals.

Click here to listen to the audio from today's news conference.

WHO:  Mayo Clinic and King-Devick
David Dodick, M.D., Mayo Clinic Neurologist, Director, Mayo Clinic Concussion Program
Steve Devick, founder and developer of the King-Devick Test
WHEN:  Tuesday, Jan. 27 8:30 a.m. (MST)
CALL-IN: Journalists can join the call at: 800-768-2481.
RSVP: Emily Blahnik at blahnik.emily@mayo.edu or 507-538-7404.

INFO: Journalists who are registered members of Mayo Clinic News Network will have access to materials under embargo at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/Journalists can register at http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/request-account/. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Sharon Theimer (@stheimer) posted · Mon, Jan 26 9:32am · View  

Precision Medicine: Mayo Clinic Expert Describes Next Steps to Help More Patients

Rochester, Minn. – “Precision medicine” is becoming a national catchphrase after President Obama highlighted it in his State of the Union address. CIM-Logo Center for Individualized Medicine
But what exactly is it? Richard Weinshilboum, M.D., acting director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, describes this new, rapidly advancing frontier in medicine and outlines 10 changes that would speed development and help more patients benefit from a personalized approach to health care:

What is precision medicine? In precision medicine, also called individualized medicine or personalized medicine, physicians use knowledge about a person’s personal genetic makeup to help determine the best plan for disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The mapping of the human genome in 2003 by U.S. scientists jump-started medical genomics; the Human Genome Project was an immense international collaboration that took 13 years and cost $3.8 billion. The National Institutes of Health’s National Human Genome Research Institute, which coordinated the project, estimates economic growth from that project at $798 billion.

"We are now poised to apply genomic technologies developed with the findings of the Human Genome Project into everyday patient care,” Dr. Weinshilboum says.

“However, if the U.S. is to remain the world leader in health care innovation and delivery, we need another national genomics effort that will accelerate scientific discovery and clinical implementation while continuing to encourage the rapid technological innovations and entrepreneurialism that have gotten us to this point."

MEDIA CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Dr. Weinshilboum or other Mayo Clinic individualized medicine experts, please contact Sam Smith or Robert Nellis in Mayo Clinic Public Affairs at 507-284-5005 or newsbureau@mayo.edu. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Wed, Jan 21 2:46pm · View  

Mayo Clinic to host Science Conference for area students on Jan. 27

Researchers working in labMayo Clinic researchers have invited approximately 200 area eighth grade and high school students to the 16th Biennial Celebration of Research, a daylong conference for students interested in learning about careers in science.

The keynote address, "Harnessing Viruses to Attack Cancer," will be presented by Eva Galanis, M.D., a professor of oncology and chair of the Department of Molecular Medicine at Mayo Clinic. This year's theme, "Going Viral," pertains to Dr. Galanis’ research and clinical efforts on using modified viruses to develop novel therapeutics for cancer treatment.

Students are scheduled to attend from Albert Lea, Altura, Austin, Blooming Prairie, Caledonia, Chatfield, Dover, Elgin, Eyota, Faribault, Grand Meadow, Houston, Kasson, Kenyon, Lanesboro, Lewiston, Lyle, Mantorville, Mazeppa, Millville, Northfield, Owatonna, Peterson, Pine Island, Plainview, Rochester, Rushford, Southland, Stewartville, Winona and Zumbrota. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Kevin Punsky (@kevinpunsky) posted · Fri, Dec 12 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic Names Christina Zorn, J.D., as Chief Administrative Officer in Jacksonville, Florida

Christina Zorn, J.D.

Christina Zorn, J.D.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Mayo Clinic has appointed Christina Zorn, J.D., as chief administrative officer of its campus in Jacksonville, Fla., and vice chair of Administration, Mayo Clinic.

She will serve as administrative partner to Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., incoming vice president of Mayo Clinic and chief executive officer of the Jacksonville campus, as previously announced. Zorn assumes her new role on Jan. 1.

“Christina Zorn has significant experience at Mayo Clinic as well as excellent insight into the strengths of Mayo Clinic’s Florida staff and the unique challenges of the local and regional market,” says Dr. Farrugia. “I look forward to working with Christina as we continue the excellent efforts underway in delivering outstanding care to our patients, advancing research and educating the next generation of providers in Florida and throughout the Southeast.”

Zorn has been with Mayo Clinic since 2002. She began her career at Mayo Clinic as a legal counsel and now serves as the chair of the Florida division of the Legal Department. In addition, Zorn has served as an administrator for the Department of Ophthalmology in Florida and for several key initiatives.

She succeeds Robert Brigham, who has served as chief administrative officer in Florida since 2005. Brigham will retire from Mayo Clinic at the end of 2014. Zorn will work closely with Brigham to ensure a smooth leadership transition.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Punsky, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 904-953-0746,
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Joe Dangor (@joedangor) posted · Wed, Dec 3 2014 · View  

Nivolumab shows significant benefit for Hodgkin’s lymphoma in Mayo Clinic co-led phase I study

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A phase I clinical trial of nivolumab found that the immune-boosting drug is a highly effective therapy for Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The multi-institution study, led by Mayo Clinic, indicated that the drug was safe and led to an 87 percent response rate in patients who had failed on other treatments. Results of the study appear in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The findings support further development of nivolumab, which enhances the immune system’s ability to detect and kill cancer cells. The drug has already demonstrated benefit in the treatment of other cancers, particularly melanoma, renal cell cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer.

“Nivolumab is a very promising agent that is reasonably well-tolerated and can easily be combined with other agents in the future,” says Stephen Ansell, M.D., Ph.D., a hematologist and co-lead author of the study. “There is evidence now that you can fight cancer by optimizing your immune function, either by enhancing signals that stimulate the immune response or blocking signals that dampen it.”

[...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Bob Nellis (@bobnellis) posted · Thu, Dec 4 2014 · View  

Mayo Clinic’s Discovery’s Edge Launches Android Platform

DE_CoverROCHESTER, Minn. — Android users no longer have to miss out on all the research discoveries coming from Mayo Clinic. The newest issue of Discovery’s Edge, Mayo Clinic’s research magazine, is now available on all Android devices, as well as the iPad, online and in print. Research news from Mayo Clinic — however, whenever and wherever you want to read it.

Highlights in this issue explore the past, present and future of Mayo Clinic research, including:

Biomarker discovery: Staying one step ahead of cancer

Read about a 12-month snapshot of how four researchers combined their talents to discover biomarkers that could help specific patients with difficult medical issues. In that time span, the Biomarker Discovery Program — part of Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine — found 32 biomarkers using custom algorithms and other innovative approaches that physicians can use to aid patients.

Mayo Clinic plugs into drug discovery

Collaboration is also the story of Mayo Clinic’s latest partnership — with Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. Two organizations looking for just the right counterpart to meet a strategic need found each other at just the right time to fast-track drug discovery for Mayo patients.

Next generation: Developing tomorrow’s biomedical researchers

The path to becoming a biomedical researcher is not for the faint of heart. This issue’s cover story takes a glimpse at three scientists-in-training at Mayo Graduate School and the obstacles they are facing, both personal and professional, as they strive toward careers in research. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Log in

version 2.8.2.2
Page loaded in 1.320 seconds