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debanderson

Tue, Mar 15 at 8:49pm EDT by @debanderson · View  

Mayo Clinic Schools Advance in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Grad School Rankings

Nurse Anesthesia program at Mayo School of Health SciencesROCHESTER, Minn. — U.S. News & World Report today released its 2017 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation. Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, advanced significantly in the findings.

“We are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,” says Mark Warner, M.D., Juanita Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “These high ratings reflect the commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.”

Mayo School of Health Sciences, which focuses on training allied health professionals, received high ratings for two of its graduate-level programs. New to the survey in 2016 are rankings for nurse anesthesia programs. Mayo’s program ranked as one of the top 10 Nurse Anesthesia training programs in the nation. The school’s Physical Therapy program moved up to garner a top 20 ranking among Best Health Schools.

“Providing the highest quality education to future health professionals is imperative,” says Michael Silber, M.B., Ch.B., Dean of Mayo’s School of Health Sciences. “With the looming physician shortage and the changing nature of health care, more and more emphasis is being placed on working in care teams – where the physician and well-trained allied health professionals each bring their expertise to the table to provide the best care for the patient.”

Dr. Silber shared that the school offers more than 125 programs, ranging from certificate level through doctorate level, and representing 55 health science careers. He notes that the school’s expert faculty, hands-on training and immersion in Mayo Clinic’s unique model of patient care and professionalism have built the school’s reputation and make graduates of these programs highly sought-after in the job market.

Long renowned for its medical degree training success, Mayo Medical School now ranks among the top 25 Best Medical Schools in the country for research, moving into 24th position according to the survey. Also showing a significant leap is the medical school’s primary care ranking at 32nd, up from 42nd last year.

Mayo’s progression in the Best Medical School rankings comes as no surprise to Michele Halyard, M.D., interim dean of Mayo Medical School. Along with other key differentiators, Dr. Halyard notes that many of the med students entering Mayo Medical School begin participating in research within their first two years and the school integrates research training into its third-year curriculum. Eighty percent of the school’s students – more than twice the national average – publish in peer-reviewed medical journals.

“We have outstanding physicians, physician scientists and dedicated researchers training the next generation of physicians to advance the science of medicine,” says Dr. Halyard. “And, while the majority of our students go on to medical specialty residencies, we also support the growing need for primary care physicians.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

Dr. Halyard points to several factors that influence Mayo Medical School’s advancement in the 2017 survey standings. It has the highest faculty-to-student ratio among medical schools at 16-to-1 and also was recognized by U.S. News & World Report in 2015 as one of the Top 10 Most Affordable Private Medical Schools.

In 2015, Mayo’s medical school became the first school in the nation to incorporate an innovative Science of Health Care Delivery curriculum, jointly developed with Arizona State University, into its four-year medical school curriculum. The school is also teaming with the American Medical Association’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative to share its curricula advances with other medical schools around the country.

Dr. Halyard also notes that Mayo Medical School is expanding to a national footprint that will include the original medical school in Rochester, Minnesota, a four-year campus opening in Scottsdale/Phoenix, Arizona in 2017 and a third- and fourth-year program planned for Mayo’s Jacksonville, Florida campus. Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus will begin accepting applications for incoming first-year students on June 1, 2016.

“The culmination of these efforts is raising the visibility of our school and having a positive impact on our survey standings,” says Dr. Halyard.

The U.S. News & World Report statistical surveys are sent in late 2015 and early 2016 to more than 1,900 graduate program administrators and the reputational survey goes out to more than 18,400 academics and professionals representing educational programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. For Best Medical School rankings, data gathered gauge expert opinion of graduate school program excellence and statistical quality indicators for graduate school faculty, research and students. These include undergraduate GPA, median Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score, a school’s acceptance rate, faculty-to-student ratio, total institutional National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants acquired and NIH research grants per faculty member. The Best Health School rankings are based on peer assessment. The full new rankings and data can be found on the U.S. News website.
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About Mayo School of Health Sciences
Each year, nearly 1,700 students enroll in more than 130 Mayo School of Health Sciences programs representing 55 health sciences careers. With a low student-to-faculty ratio, every student benefits from world-class instructors, innovative educational methods and extensive individualized training at Mayo Clinic, a premiere academic medical organization.

About Mayo Medical School
Originally established in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1972, Mayo Medical School is considered one of the most highly competitive medical schools in the country for admittance. Averaging more than 4,700 applications per year, Mayo Medical School traditionally accepts 54 students per enrolling class. With the opening of the Arizona campus in 2017, this enrollment will nearly double with 50 additional students on the new campus per year. The expansion to a national footprint will give the school the ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to students across all Mayo campuses.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Thu, Mar 10 at 11:26am EDT by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic to Host High School ‘Saving Lives with Gus’ Medical Seminar

Researcher and student in labROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will host a hands-on medical seminar for local high school students on Monday, March 14.

WHO: David Farley, M.D., general surgeon at Mayo Clinic; nearly 125 high school students from Rochester, La Crescent, Minnesota, and Forest City, Iowa.

WHAT: A video series called “Saving Lives with Gus” was created by a team of surgical residents and simulation medicine fellows at Mayo Clinic to teach the general public simple things that can be done do to save lives. As an extension, the residents and fellows have created this seminar for high school students to get early exposure to the medical field. The students will have an opportunity to perform CPR on mannequins, use a defibrillator, perform an ultrasound and test their knot tying skills on a simulated vessel, along with many more opportunities.

“We hope it is a great opportunity for high school students to get hands-on experience with a variety of medical interventions,” says Dr. Farley. “In an ideal scenario, this effort helps save a life in the future and better informs and stimulates young learners to consider medicine as a potential career.”

WHERE: Phillips Hall, Siebens 1, Mayo Clinic, 100 Second Ave. SW, Rochester.

WHEN: Monday, March 14, 9 a.m. CDT.

Reporters should arrive by 8:50 a.m. CDT at the Information Desk, Gonda Lobby.

NOTE: Members of the media must RSVP to Kelley Luckstein, Public Affairs, at 507-284-5005.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, 507-284-5005, email: [email protected]

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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micahdorfner

Wed, Mar 9 at 5:00am EDT by @micahdorfner · View  

Keeping Your Kids Healthy at School

children at school lunch table, African-America boy eating an apple
Do you know why school kids get sick so often? In the early school years, your child’s immune system is put to the test. Young children in large groups tend to easily spread organisms that cause illness.

“Many childhood illnesses are caused by viruses,” says Tracy Warsing, M.D., Mayo Clinic Health System family physician. “All it takes is a single child to bring a virus to school for the spread to begin.”

What’s the best way to keep your child healthy in school? Frequent hand washing is the simplest and most effective way to stay healthy. Remind your child to wash his or her hands before eating and after going to the bathroom, blowing his or her nose, or playing outside. Kids should soap up for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice.

Dr. Warsing suggests these other tips for keeping kids healthy in school:

  • Give your child alcohol-based hand sanitizer to keep in his or her desk or backpack. Kids should use hand sanitizer before eating snacks or lunch and after using shared objects, such as a computer, pencil sharpener or water fountain.
  • Give your child a package of tissues to keep in his or her desk or backpack. Encourage your child to sneeze into a tissue. If a tissue is not available, he or she should cough or sneeze into the crook of his or her elbow.
  • Remind children to keep their hands away from their eyes and out of their mouths; hands are often covered in germs.
  • Remind children to not share water bottles, food or other personal items. Use this simple rule: If you put the item in your mouth, keep it to yourself.

"Last but not least, it’s also important for your child to eat a healthy diet, get plenty of sleep and stay current on his or her vaccinations in order to help fend off illness causing organisms," says Dr. Warsing.

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debanderson

Mon, Feb 1 at 6:39am EDT by @debanderson · View  

Mayo School of Health Sciences Announces Career Immersion Program, July 11-15, 2016

Medical student looking through microscope

Area high school junior and senior applicants sought for the weeklong career exploration experience.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo School of Health Sciences is hosting its first Career Immersion Program for diverse high school juniors and seniors. The program, to be held July 11-15, 2016, includes a week of career exploration, supervised lodging and meals in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. Participants will meet with current students and professionals in a range of health science professions, network with Mayo Clinic faculty and learn the academic path for enrolling in accredited health science education programs.

The 2016 program will focus on laboratory medicine professions — specifically cytotechnology, genetic counseling, histology, medical laboratory science, molecular genetics, pathology and phlebotomy. Learn more about these and other health sciences careers at Mayo School of Health Sciences.

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected]

Qualified students will be Minnesota juniors or seniors during the 2016-2017 school year, have GPAs of 2.75 or higher, and an expressed interest in health science professions. Completed applications are due by Friday, March 18, 2016, and must include:

• Completed online application form
• Current high school transcript
• One letter of recommendation from a science teacher, guidance counselor or principal
• A brief one page essay about the student’s interest in health sciences

Successful applicants will be notified in the spring.

Educators, parents and students can direct questions to [email protected].

Mayo School of Health Sciences also has 16 health sciences certificate programs that welcome qualified undergraduate students.

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About Mayo School of Health Sciences
Mayo School of Health Sciences has been preparing students for successful careers in the health sciences for more than 100 years. Mayo School of Health Sciences strives to educate students who excel in academic achievement to become quality patient care providers. Nearly 800 students are enrolled annually in more than 60 Mayo School of Health Sciences programs representing 27 health sciences professions. The school’s nearly 300 faculty members ensure that students receive exceptional personalized training.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information,visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic, or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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DebBalzer

Aug 27, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Feed the Body and Brain

If your children participate in school sports, you know proper nutrition will help them perform at their best. The young girl, girl holding two apples over her eyessame holds true for academics. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatrician Dr. Brian Lynch says healthy, nutritious foods will benefit kids' academic performance, behavior and overall health. Plus, it will combat childhood obesity. Dr. Lynch and his colleagues encourage families to follow the 9-5-2-1-0 Let's Go! rule as a guide to good health and nutrition for kids:

  • 9 – get nine hours of sleep per night
  • 5 – eat five or more servings of fruit and vegetables every day
  • 2 – limit screen time to two hours per day
  • 1 – get one hour of exercise per day
  • 0 – drink zero sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice

Dr. Lynch says when it comes to feeding your children, avoid processed foods and foods containing trans fats, saturated fats, sugar and sodium. Instead, opt for more of what he calls "real" foods – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:58] Click here for the transcript.

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DebBalzer

Aug 25, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: A Good Night's Sleep

Children need to get plenty of sleep in order to perform well in school. After a summer of staying up late and then young teenage boy asleep on his schoolbookssleeping in, many kids are out of their school year bedtime routines.  Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal says in order for most school-age children to be at their best, they need to get from 8 1/2 to 9 hours of sleep every night. He also says, "Children should work back into a school year sleep schedule gradually, starting a week or two before the first bell rings."

Dr. Kotagal has tips on how to help children and teens get the sleep they need for a productive school year.

  • Wake children up 30 minutes earlier every few days as school approaches
  • Turn off electronics 30 minutes to an hour before bed
  • Temporarily avoid or shorten naps to help children be sleepy at night
  • Make sure the bed is used for sleep only

 Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [2:29] Click here for the transcript.

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DebBalzer

Aug 20, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Sick Kids – Should They Stay or Should They Go?

sick little boy lying in bed with thermometer and teddy bear toyYour child is running a fever and you're running late to work. What do you do? Keep your child home or send him or her to school? When a child is truly sick from an infection such as a bad cold or flu, making sure he or she stays home is the best way to prevent the illness from getting worse or from spreading to others. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "Stopping the spread of an infectious disease is a combination of good hand hygiene and keeping sick people out of public areas."

Dr. Tosh says it is in the best interest of sick children and adults to be able to rest and recover.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:04 ] Click here for the transcript.

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DebBalzer

Aug 18, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Building Routines

 wood blocks spelling out the word routineFor many kids, summer is a time to stay up late, sleep in and hang out with friends. Waking up for that first day of a new school year can be a shock if children, teens and parents or caregivers have not come up with a plan – a routine. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside  reminds us that routines are good for everybody. He says, "Routines give us structure and help us complete the tasks and challenges we face each day." The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website notes that routines help children know what to expect as the day unfolds. Dr. Whiteside says developing routines for morning, bedtime and any other regularly occurring event can make things run more smoothly at home and at school. Each family should begin the transition into a back-to-school routine at least a week or two before the first bell rings.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:07] Click here for the transcript.

 

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DebBalzer

Aug 17, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Know the Warning Signs of Bullying

For many children, the start of a new school year can be very stressful, especially if they've been victims of bullying in the past. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Bridget Biggs says parents and caregivers should know the warning signs. "If your child is reluctant to go to school, stressed after spending time online or avoids social situations, he or she may be being bullied." Dr. Biggs points out that consequences of bullying can be serious. Victims are at increased risk of depressionanxiety, sleep problems, self-harm, poor grades and in rare cases, suicide.

Dr. Biggs has tips for parents and caregivers on how to help children who are victims of bullying.word cloud with the words for school bullying

  • Talk it out – ask your child about concerns
  • Learn – get information from your child about what's happening
  • Take notes – record details of bullying events
  • Discuss how to respond – walk away, get help from trusted adult or peer
  • Build self-esteem – encourage your child to get involved in positive activities
  • Team up – reach out to teachers
  • If the bullying doesn't stop, contact the school or proper authorities

Dr. Biggs reminds us that bullying comes in many forms: physical, verbal, emotional, social and online. She says creating a culture of respect in and out of the classroom is key to bullying prevention.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [1:51] Click here for the transcript.

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jstreed

Aug 17, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

Sleep Needs/Vaccine Update/School Sports/Student Depression: Mayo Clinic Radio

The end of summer is fast approaching ... and millions of youngsters across the country are getting ready to return to the classroom. On this back-to-school edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, children's sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal outlines how muchsleep children need to be fully engaged in class. Also on the program, pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Robert Jacobson provides an update on vaccines. Sports medicine specialist Dr. David Soma talks about preparing for school sports. And psychiatrist Dr. Paul Croarkin has tips for parents on what to watch for when a child seems anxious or depressed.

Here's the podcast:MayoClinicRadio 08-15-15 PODCAST

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jstreed

Aug 17, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

School Nutrition: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, dietitian Kate Zeratsky offers some healthy tips on keeping your kids fueled for the day at school.

To listen, click the link below.

School Nutrition

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jstreed

Aug 12, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

Sleep and the School Year: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, sleep medicine specialist, Dr. Suresh Kotagal has tips on making sure your child gets the sleep they need to learn.

To listen, click the link below.

Sleep and the School Year

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DebBalzer

Aug 11, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Separation Anxiety, Fears and Stress

Getting ready for a new school year can be exciting for children, parents and caregivers. It may also be a major cause of anxiety or stress. Whether kids are heading off to elementary school, high school or college, leaving the safety and familiarity of home can prompt feelings of fear. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside says if back-to-school anxiety or separation anxiety become overwhelming and disruptive, taking steps to reduce those fears is important. "Some kids are more anxious than others, and transitions like going back to school can be more difficult for them. Talking to them and preparing them ahead of time by doing things such as visiting the schools and meeting teachers can be beneficial."

Dr. Whiteside offers additional tips that can help:a red pastel pencil writing the word stress

  • Tour school ahead of time –  classrooms, lockers, cafeteria, gymnasium
  • Be social – get in touch with school peers
  • Practice academic work
  • Develop a routine – wake up early to be ready on time
  • Spend time apart so kids and parents/caregivers can get used to being separated

If anxiety becomes severe, talk to your health care provider to be sure the anxiety is not caused by an underlying issues such as a learning disability.

For parents who have separation anxiety from sending their child off to college, Dr. Whiteside recommends getting support by talking to others who have already gone through that transition.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:31] Click here for the transcript. 

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DebBalzer

Aug 10, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Vaccinations and Immunizations

vaccination checklist

At back-to-school time, many parents and caregivers make checklists to ensure children have the supplies they need for the school year. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatrician Dr. Robert Jacobson says vaccinations should definitely be on that list. He says they protect children from contracting and spreading diseases that could cause serious complications. "Work done here at Mayo Clinic in the 1970s showed how severe chickenpox can be for some children. That research convinced experts throughout the country that we needed a chickenpox vaccine." Dr. Jacobson says to check and see that school-age kids, including those going off to college, have vaccinations that are up to date.

Click here to find your state and school vaccine requirements.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT1:16] Click here for the transcript.

 

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rdietman

Aug 10, 2015 by @rdietman · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Sleep Needs/Vaccine Update/School Sports/Student Depression

The end of summer is fast approaching ... and millions of youngsters across the country are getting ready to return to the classroom. On this back-to-school edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, children's sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal outlines how much sleep children need to be fully engaged in class. Also on the program, pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Robert Jacobson provides an update on vaccines. Sports medicine specialist Dr. David Soma talks about preparing for school sports. And psychiatrist Dr. Paul Croarkin has tips for parents on what to watch for when a child seems anxious or depressed.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: It's better for a youngster to focus on a single school sport, rather than sample several activities.

Miss the show?  Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio 08-15-15 PODCAST

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

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jstreed

Aug 3, 2015 by @jstreed · View  

Doctor Shortage/Medical School/House Calls/Binge Eating: Mayo Clinic Radio

Primary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Also on the program, Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. And Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being used to provide more efficient care. And psychologist and eating-disorder specialist Dr. Karen Grothe explains binge eating and how it's treated.

Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio 08-01-15 PODCAST

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rdietman

Jul 27, 2015 by @rdietman · View  

Mayo Clinic Radio: Doctor Shortage/Medical School/House Calls/Binge Eating

Primary care doctors are often on the front lines of providing medical care. But they are increasingly in short supply as more aging Americans need health care. On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, family medicine specialist Dr. John Bachman discusses the growing doctor shortage and how to reverse it. Also on the program, Mayo Medical School Interim Dean Dr. Michele Halyard and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Darcy Reed outline what's new in training tomorrow's doctors. And Dr. Paul Takahashi, a specialist in geriatric medicine, talks about how house calls are again being used to provide more efficient care. And psychologist and eating-disorder specialist Dr. Karen Grothe explains binge eating and how it's treated.

Myth or Matter-of-Fact: According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, a shortage of around 130,000 doctors is projected by the year 2035.

Miss the show?  Here's the podcast: MayoClinicRadio 08-01-15 PODCAST

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeartRadio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

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jimmcveigh

May 14, 2015 by @jimmcveigh · View  

Mayo Medical School Receives State Licensure For Arizona Branch Campus

stethoscope and book binding with words health and medical on tableSCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Mayo Medical School announced that its planned expansion in Scottsdale, has received licensure by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education, the group responsible for regulating private postsecondary degree-granting institutions within the state of Arizona.

“This is a major milestone in our journey to open a full four-year branch campus of Mayo Medical School in Scottsdale,” says Wyatt Decker, M.D., CEO of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Earlier this month, Mayo Medical School leaders announced they had also received endorsement for the expansion from the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the accrediting body for medical education.

While many experts wonder if medical schools across the country are doing enough to prepare graduates for the challenges of an evolving health care system, Dr. Decker notes that the medical school — planned to open in 2017 — won’t rest on conventional physician training.

“The reality is that most medical schools are teaching the same way they did 100 years ago,” Dr. Decker said in a recent Wall Street Journal article. “It’s time to blow up that model and ask, ‘What must we do to train tomorrow’s doctors?’”

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-4222, [email protected]

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debanderson

Apr 7, 2015 by @debanderson · View  

Mayo Medical School Receives Accreditation Endorsement for Branch Campuses

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Medical School announced that its expansion plan to establish branch campuses in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jacksonville, Florida, has received the endorsement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the national accrediting body for medical education.

Education Photo2“We are thrilled with the positive response from LCME,” says Sherine Gabriel, M.D., M.Sc., (retiring) dean of Mayo Medical School and William J. and Charles H. Mayo Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “This signifies an important step in our transformation to a national medical school and our ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to our students across all campuses.”

Originally established in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1972, Mayo Medical School is considered one of the most highly competitive medical schools in the country for admittance. Averaging over 4,700 applications per year, Mayo Medical School traditionally accepts only 50 students per enrolling class. With the opening of the Arizona campus in 2017, this will increase to 50 additional students per year. The expansion of the medical school is a natural next step in its mission to train highly skilled physicians. Notably, Mayo Medical School students routinely match to top residency programs across the country, and 80 percent — more than twice the national average — publish research manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. Careful planning will maintain another important feature of the school — its high faculty-to-single student ratio.

MEDIA CONTACT: Deborah Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, [email protected].

[...]

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jstreed

Sep 5, 2014 by @jstreed · View  

School Nutrition: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, dietitian Kate Zeratsky offers some healthy tips on keeping your kids fueled for the day at school.

To listen, click the link below.

School Nutrition

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