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debanderson

Tue, Mar 14 at 1:00pm EDT by @debanderson · View  

Schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science included in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate Schools rankings

medical students consulting near EKG machineROCHESTER, Minn. ― U.S. News & World Report today released its 2018 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine and Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, are included on the list. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine advanced to a top 20 ranking in the report.

“Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science continues to implement the most innovative, highest-quality education and curriculum across all the schools,” says Fredric Meyer, M.D., Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean of Education, Mayo Clinic. “Staying at the forefront of medical education and collaborating with the best and brightest minds at Mayo Clinic and around the country will generate educational opportunities that are second to none for our students as they graduate and provide care across the globe.”

Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences, which focuses on training allied health professionals, once again received high ratings for two of its graduate-level programs. For the second year in a row, Mayo’s nurse anesthesia program ranked as one of the top 10 nurse anesthesia training programs in the nation. The school’s physical therapy program continued to hold a top 20 ranking among Best Health Schools.

“Providing the highest-quality education to future health professionals is imperative to creating well-rounded health care providers,” says Michael Silber, M.B., Ch.B., dean, Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences. “With the looming physician shortage and the changing nature of health care, more and more emphasis is being placed on working in care teams – where the physician and well-trained allied health professionals each bring their expertise to the table to provide the best care for the patient. Our rankings reflect our leadership in training the next generation of health care providers.”

Dr. Silber shared that the school offers 135 programs, ranging from certificate level through doctorate level, and representing 58 health science professions. He notes that the school’s expert faculty, hands-on training and clinical immersion in Mayo Clinic’s unique model of patient care and professionalism have built the school’s reputation and make graduates of these programs highly sought-after in the job market. The Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences continues to evolve to meet patient need, recently approving a proposal to initiate a new physician assistant master’s degree in collaboration with multiple local universities.

Long renowned for its medical degree training success, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine now ranks among the top 20 Best Medical Schools in the country for research, advancing from the No. 24 position in the 2016 survey. Also showing steady advancement is the medical school’s primary care ranking at No. 31, inching up from No. 32 in 2016.

“We are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,” says Dr. Meyer. “While we do not have the large university structure these rankings are geared toward, we do have an outstanding medical organization and a national reputation for unsurpassed medical and research training. The continuous advancement in national standings reflects the expertise and commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest-quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.”

Many medical students entering Mayo Clinic School of Medicine begin participating in research within their first two years, and the school integrates comprehensive research training into its third-year curriculum. Eighty percent of the school’s students – more than twice the national average – publish in peer-reviewed medical journals. The school also offers an M.D.-Ph.D. training program in tandem with Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

“The willingness of Mayo’s physicians, physician scientists and researchers to provide training to the next generation of physicians who will advance the science of medicine plays a pivotal role in creating well-rounded medical students and future health care leaders,” says Dr. Meyer. “And while the majority of our students go on to medical specialty residencies, for which Mayo Clinic is known, we also recognize the significance of supporting the growing need for primary care physicians.”

As the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine continues to expand its national footprint, advancing the science of medicine will be emphasized in a single, national curriculum across all three school sites. Mayo Clinic School of Medicine site in Arizona will host its inaugural class starting in July 2017. The school also offers a two plus two program, where medical students spend their first two years studying at Mayo’s Rochester campus and complete their final two clinical years on Mayo’s Jacksonville, Florida, campus.

With multiple sites, creating impactful learning experiences across Mayo Clinic sites provide students a valuable educational experience with diverse patient populations. Collaborating with key universities in transformational medical education initiatives such as the Science of Health Care Delivery curriculum with Arizona State University and the American Medical Association’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education further expand the educational opportunities for Mayo’s students.

The U.S. News & World Report statistical surveys are sent in late 2016 and early 2017 to more than 1,900 graduate program administrators, and the reputational survey goes out to more than 18,400 academics and professionals representing educational programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. For Best Medical School rankings, data gathered gauge expert opinion of graduate school program excellence and statistical quality indicators for graduate school faculty, research and students. These include undergraduate GPA, median Medical College Admission Test score, a school’s acceptance rate, faculty-to-student ratio, total institutional National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants acquired, and NIH research grants per faculty member. The Best Health School rankings are based on peer assessment. Find the full new rankings and data on the U.S. News & World Report website.

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About Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
Each year, nearly 1,700 students enroll in more than 135 Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences programs representing 58 health sciences careers. With a low student-to-faculty ratio, every student benefits from world-class instructors, innovative educational methods and extensive individualized training at Mayo Clinic, a premiere academic medical organization.

About Mayo Clinic School of Medicine
Originally established in Rochester in 1972, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine is considered one of the most highly competitive medical schools in the country for admittance. Averaging more than 4,700 applications per year, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine traditionally accepts 54 students per enrolling class. With the opening of the Arizona campus in 2017, this enrollment will nearly double, with 50 additional students on the new campus per year. The expansion to a national footprint will give the school the ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to students across all Mayo campuses.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

MEDIA CONTACT
Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005,
newsbureau@mayo.edu

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KelleyLuckstein

Mon, Mar 13 at 11:59am EDT by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences initiates collaborative physician assistant program with local universities

Little girl being checked by friendly health professional with stethoscopeCollaboration includes expansion of Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Cascade Meadow facility in Rochester

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Mayo Clinic board of governors approved a proposal to initiate development of a new physician assistant master’s degree program through Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences. The proposal is a collaborative effort between Mayo’s School of Health Sciences and Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota to create a comprehensive 3+2 Physician Assistant program to meet future patient needs in the area. The proposed program also includes a collaborative pathway for University of Minnesota Rochester students to participate in the program.

“Innovative educational collaborations will play an essential role in creating the highest quality, patient-centered care,” says Fredric Meyer, M.D., Juanita Kious Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. “We are committed to developing educational pathways for students that empower them to meet the needs of area patients.”

The 3+2 Physician Assistant program will start the first 24-student cohort at the collaborating universities in fall 2019. A new cohort will be jointly selected for freshman admission each year. Students can become a physician assistant in as little as five years — spending three years studying at the Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Winona Campus or at the University of Minnesota Rochester campus, followed by two years of graduate study in Rochester. The graduate portion of the program will include courses and labs held at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota’s expanding Cascade Meadow facility in Rochester and hands-on clinical experiences at Mayo Clinic. Students successfully completing the program will earn a bachelor’s degree from Saint Mary's University of Minnesota or the University of Minnesota Rochester, and a master of health sciences degree in physician assistant studies from Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences.

Physician assistants may become a growing part of the medical workforce. By 2025, a shortage of 124,000 primary care physicians is anticipated, with a high percentage in rural areas. Physician assistants are expected to play a pivotal role in primary patient care as health care evolves. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reflects this data, as their predictive models expect 30 percent job growth for physician assistants by 2024, the second-fastest-growing health care profession in the next decade.

“Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences plans new programs to meet the evolving needs of our patients,” says Michael Silber, M.B, Ch.B., Dean, Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences. “We look forward to collaborating with Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota and University of Minnesota Rochester in developing this comprehensive physician assistant program.”

“This collaboration continues the Saint Mary’s University tradition of excellence in preparing students to lead and serve in the health and sciences professions,” says Brother William Mann, FSC, president, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, which has been based in Winona, Minnesota, since 1912. “Many alumni already work at Mayo Clinic.”

By offering an option for physician assistant students to focus in rural health care settings, the program seeks to ease the lack of available medical care in rural environments. While 20 percent of the American population lives in rural areas, only 10 percent of doctors practice in these areas. Only 4 percent of family medicine training occurs in these areas, further exacerbating the rural health care issue. Physician assistants can help alleviate this issue by performing examinations, and diagnosing and treating patients as part of a closely coordinated care team with physicians.

“This collaborative effort between local institutions of higher education is a shining example of how to work together for the greater good of the community,” says Lori Carrell, Ph.D., vice chancellor for Academic Affairs and Student Development, University of Minnesota Rochester. “Creating pathways for students in high-demand, high-growth fields is critical to ensure healthy, vibrant communities.”

To house the physician assistant program, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota will expand its facilities. In addition to a new Science and Learning Center scheduled to open in spring 2017 on the Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota campus in Winona, the university will expand its Cascade Meadow facility in Rochester.

The Cascade Meadow addition — expected to begin in late spring 2017 — includes a nearly 10,000-square-foot space estimated to cost $4.4 million, which has been provided by Jack and Mary Ann Remick of Rochester. The Remicks’ donation includes an additional $600,000 to be used for program development.

The Cascade Meadow expansion will support delivery of the physician assistant program and future allied health offerings. The classrooms and meeting spaces also will be used by Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota adult students in other university graduate degree programs offered in Rochester.

According to Brother Mann, the Remicks are inspirational champions of education and long-time supporters of Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. As residents of Rochester, the Remicks say they are dedicated to supporting growth in programming beneficial to the area, including gifts to Mayo Clinic, which is transforming into a global destination for health and wellness. Their gift will attract talented young students to this area, while helping to fulfill a need in the medical community. Mary Ann is chair of the Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota board of trustees, having started her work on the board in 2004. Jack previously served on the board from 1999 to 2004. The Remicks established Cascade Meadow in 2011 and transferred ownership to Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota in 2015.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

About Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota
Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota awakens, nurtures and empowers learners to ethical lives of leadership and service. At Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, students find in every classroom — whether in person or online — a relationship-driven, person-centered education. Through intense inquiry, students discover the truths in the world and the character within. Founded in 1912 and accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota enrolls 5,800 students at its residential undergraduate college in Winona and its Schools of Graduate and Professional Programs, based in Minneapolis but extending worldwide. Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota offers respected and affordable programs in a variety of areas leading to bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees, as well as certificates and specialist designations. Learn more at smumn.edu.

About University of Minnesota Rochester
The University of Minnesota Rochester promotes learning and development through personalized education in a technology-enhanced environment. The University of Minnesota Rochester empowers undergraduate and graduate students to be responsible for their own learning and provides appropriate support to prepare them to succeed in a global and multicultural society. The University of Minnesota Rochester serves as a conduit and catalyst for leveraging intellectual and economic resources in Rochester and southeastern Minnesota through its signature academic, research and public engagement programs in collaboration with other campuses of the University of Minnesota, other higher education institutions throughout the state and nation, governmental and nonprofit organizations, and private enterprise.

About Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
Each year, nearly 1,700 students enroll in more than 130 Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences allied health programs representing 55 health sciences careers. With a low student-to-faculty ratio, every student benefits from world-class instructors, innovative educational methodologies and extensive individualized state-of-the-art training at Mayo Clinic, a premiere academic medical organization. Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences is one of five premiere schools of medical education within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Matthew Brenden, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Stacia Vogel, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, 612-728-5119, svogel@smumn.edu

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debanderson

Dec 21, 2016 by @debanderson · View  

High schoolers invited to participate in 2017 Health Sciences’ Career Immersion Program

Photo of diverse students in hospital setting

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences is hosting its second Career Immersion Program July 9-14, 2017, for Minnesota high school sophomores and juniors. The week, which is free for the 40 students accepted, includes supervised group lodging and meals in downtown Rochester, meetings with current students and professionals in a range of health science professions, networking with Mayo Clinic faculty, and opportunities to learn about the academic path for enrolling in accredited health science education programs.

The program will expose participants to varied health science career paths, including:

  • Imaging professions (e.g., nuclear medicine, radiography and sonography),
  • Laboratory medicine professions (e.g., medical laboratory science and pathology assistant phlebotomy),
  • Hospital-based professions (e.g., cardiovascular invasive specialist, paramedic and surgical first assistant)

Learn more about these and other health sciences careers at mayo.edu/mcshs.

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Qualified students will be sophomores or juniors during the 2016-2017 school year, have GPAs of 2.75 or higher, and have an expressed interest in health science professions. Submit applications online by Feb. 1. Complete applications will include:

  • Completed online application form
  • Current high school transcript
  • One letter of recommendation from a teacher
  • One short essay about the student’s interest in health sciences

Application decisions will be announced in the spring.

Find the application and a short video from students who attended the Career Immersion Program in 2016 at mayo.edu/mshs/careers/career-immersion. The website also details Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences’ 16 health sciences certificate programs that welcome qualified undergraduate students. Educators, parents and students can direct questions to mshsadministration@mayo.edu.

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About Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences
Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences has been preparing students for successful careers in the health sciences for more than 100 years. Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences strives to educate students who excel in academic achievement to become quality care providers for patients. More than 1,500 students are enrolled annually in more than 60 Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences programs representing 27 health sciences professions. The school’s nearly 300 faculty members ensure that students receive exceptional personalized training.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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susan_barber_lindquist

Dec 12, 2016 by @susan_barber_lindquist · View  

High school football players, 1956-1970, did not have increase of neurodegenerative diseases

young football players on the fieldROCHESTER, Minn. – A Mayo Clinic study published online today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that varsity football players from 1956 to 1970 did not have an increased risk of degenerative brain diseases compared with athletes in other varsity sports.

The researchers reviewed all the yearbooks and documented team rosters for Mayo High School and Rochester High School, now called John Marshall High School. The high school football players were compared with non-football playing athletes who were swimmers, basketball players and wrestlers.

Using the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project, each student was observed for about 40 years after participation in high school sports.

MEDIA CONTACT: Susan Barber Lindquist, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Among the 296 students who played football, the researchers found:

Among the 190 non-football athletes, the researchers found:

  • 14 cases of head trauma
  • 4 cases of mild cognitive impairment
  • 3 cases of parkinsonism
  • 1 case of dementia
  • 0 cases of ALS

The football players were found to have a suggestive increased risk of medically documented head trauma, especially in the 153 students who played football for more than one season, but they still did not show increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases.

This study mirrors a previous Mayo Clinic study of high school athletes who played between 1946 and 1956. That study also found no increased risk of degenerative brain diseases. While football between 1956 to 1970 is somewhat more similar to that of the present era — including body weight, athletic performance and equipment — football-related concussions still were minimized as “getting your bell rung,” the researchers note.

John Marshall High School football players, circa 1968-1969, are shown in the 1969 yearbook, courtesy of Rochester Public Schools and the History Center of Olmsted County.

John Marshall High School football players, circa 1968-1969, are shown in the 1969 yearbook, courtesy of Rochester Public Schools and the History Center of Olmsted County.

Football has continued to evolve. Helmets, for example, have gone from leather to hard plastic shells. However, helmets do not eliminate concussions and may provide players with a false sense of protection, says Rodolfo Savica, M.D., Ph.D., senior author of the study and a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

The researchers point out that high school sports offer clear benefits of physical fitness on cardiovascular health, and some studies also have suggested a possible protective effect against later degenerative brain illness. But the researchers caution that additional studies are needed to explore more recent eras and to involve players who participate at the collegiate and professional levels.

“This study should not be interpreted as evidence that football-related head trauma is benign,” the researchers write. “The literature on chronic traumatic encephalopathy in college and professional football players seems irrefutable, with reports of devastating outcomes. However, there may be a gradient of risk, with low potential in high school football players that played in the study period.”

In the future, the researchers plan to  replicate the study with football players in the current eras.

In addition to Dr. Savica, Mayo Clinic study co-authors are:

  • Peter Janssen
  • Jay Mandrekar, Ph.D.
  • Michelle Mielke, Ph.D.
  • Eric Ahlskog, Ph.D., M.D.
  • Bradley Boeve, M.D.
  • Keith Josephs, M.D.

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About Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Mayo Clinic Proceedings is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal that publishes original articles and reviews dealing with clinical and laboratory medicine, clinical research, basic science research, and clinical epidemiology. Mayo Clinic Proceedings is sponsored by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research as part of its commitment to physician education. It publishes submissions from authors worldwide. The journal has been published for more than 80 years and has a circulation of 130,000. Articles are available at http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

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laureljkelly

Sep 16, 2016 by @laureljkelly · View  

#FlashbackFriday 1975: Mayo Graduate School adds family practice residency

a 1975 photograph of Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minnesota

This article first appeared in April 1975, in the publication Mayovox.

The Board of Governors last month approved establishment of a new Mayo residency training program in family practice and authorized Mayo representatives to seek capitation from the state of Minnesota in support of the program.

According to Mr. A. Russell Hanson of the Division of Education and Mr. Robert W. Fleming of the Division of Administrative Services, the program is expected to become operational July 1, 1976 — in time to accommodate members of the first class to graduate from Mayo Medical School. To date, 12 Mayo Medical School students have expressed interest in the specialty of family medicine and others plan to enter primary care specialties including general internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics/gynecology.

Present plans call for a three-year program, with physicians taking their training both in and outside of Rochester. Each year, four doctors will be appointed to a Mayo-based program. Four more will enter a Mayo affiliated program of study situated elsewhere in Southern Minnesota.

In addition, discussions are in progress with officials at St. Francis Hospital, La Crosse, Wisconsin, concerning a possible affiliation there. This would add an additional 12 physicians to the program for a total of 36 residents in family practice training when the program becomes fully operational.

Funding for the program is expected to come from four sources: Mayo Foundation, private gifts and the federal and state governments.

A bill seeking limited financial assistance from the state has been drafted and submitted to the Minnesota legislature. The bill requests $12,000 per year for each physician enrolled in the program within Minnesota, to a maximum of 24 students.

Since such state support for a graduate medical education program would be unique in Mayo history, Mr. Hanson expanded on the family residency program, noting “it’s new and in a developmental stage. We don’t have a patient base at this point or an active staff teaching and seeing patients. All of this has to be developed.

“One out-of-pocket, direct, fixed cost that we can identify is the stipend of the resident, which would be $11,500 for the first year of training, $12,000 the second year and $12,500 for the last year — the same amount other resident physicians at Mayo receive.”

The program will operate within the Division of Family Medicine established at Mayo Clinic in January, 1975. Dr. Guy W. Daugherty, acting chairman of the division, will serve as acting head of the new residency program as well. Dr. Daugherty also will chair a Family Practice Residency Curriculum Development Committee, comprised in addition to Dr. Daugherty, of: Dr. Richard S. Sheldon (Obstetrics/Gynecology); Dr. Malcom I. Lindsay (Community Internal Medicine); Dr. Thomas H. Williams (Pediatrics); Dr. Maurice J. Martin (Psychiatry); Dr. Robert R. Thompson (Family Medicine) and Mr. Robert K. Smoldt (Administrative Services). In addition, those planning the program expect to invite family physicians outside Mayo to join the committee sometime soon.

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jstreed

Sep 13, 2016 by @jstreed · View  

Back to school concussion screening: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

As another school year starts, lots of kids are getting back on the field or court.  And we all know that injuries are part of the game.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we talk to sports medicine specialist Dr. Jennifer Maynard about concussion screening.

To listen, click the link below

Back to School Concussion Screening

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DebBalzer

Sep 5, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Sick kids – should they stay or should they go?

a teenage boy in bed looking sick with flu or cold

If your child is running a fever and you're running late to work, what do you do? Should you keep your child home or send him or her to school? Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says when a child is sick from an infection, such as a bad cold or flu, the best way to prevent the illness from getting worse or  spreading to others is to keep your child home. "Stopping the spread of an infectious disease is a combination of good hand hygiene and keeping sick people out of public areas."

Dr. Tosh says it is in the best interest of sick children and adults to be able to rest and recover.

Watch: Dr. Tosh

Journalists: Sound bites are in the downloads.

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JeffOlsenMN

Sep 2, 2016 by @JeffOlsenMN · View  

Mayo Clinic Minute: After-school snack ideas

young child, girl holding two apples, fruit, healthy eatingAfter a long day at school, a nutritious snack can fuel your student's growing body and avoid an attitude meltdown.

These afternoon servings of food provide energy for the daily physical activity that's recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics; and they can boost brain power for homework too.

"The size of the snack and what's in it is important," says Mayo Clinic pediatrician Dr. Vandana Bhide.

In this Mayo Clinic Minute, reporter Jeff Olsen talks with Dr. Bhide about which snacks to serve and why.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (1:00) is in the downloads. Read the script.

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DebBalzer

Aug 29, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: A Good Night's Sleep

a little boy sleeping in his bed at night

Children must get plenty of sleep to perform well in school. After a summer of staying up late and then sleeping in, many kids are out of their school year bedtime routines.  Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal says that most school-age children must sleep from 8 to nine hours every night to be at their best. He  says, "Children should work back into a school year sleep schedule gradually, starting a week or two before the first bell rings."

Dr. Kotagal offers these tips to help children get the sleep they need for a productive school year.

  • Wake up children 30 minutes earlier every few days as school approaches.
  • Turn off electronics 30 minutes to an hour before bed.
  • Temporarily avoid or shorten naps to help children be sleepy at night.
  • Make sure the bed is used for sleep only.

Watch Dr. Kotagal

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vivienw

Aug 26, 2016 by @vivienw · View  

Mayo Clinic Minute: Back to School Concussion Screening

athletes on soccer sports field holding injured heads, perhaps concussionsEveryone is at risk of getting a concussion. Those most at risk are kids on the playing field. If a child gets a concussion, removing him or her from play is a key part of treatment and recovery. To combat concussions, Mayo Clinic experts have developed a screening program that involves testing brain function skills, such as memory, reaction time and recall, before the sports season begins. Then, if concussions happen, retesting can determine when it's safe to return to the game.

Reporter Vivien Williams talks to sports medicine specialist Dr. Jennifer Maynard about concussion screening.

Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video (:58) is in the downloads. Read the script.

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DebBalzer

Aug 22, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Know the Warning Signs of Bullying

classroom of students bullying a girl

For many children, the start of a new school year can be stressful, especially if they've been victims of bullying in the past. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Bridget Biggs says parents and caregivers should know the warning signs. "If your child is reluctant to go to school, stressed after spending time online or avoids social situations, he or she may be being bullied." Dr. Biggs points out that consequences of bullying can be serious. She says victims are at increased risk of depressionanxiety, sleep problems, self-harm, poor grades and in rare cases, suicide.

Dr. Biggs shares these tips for parents and caregivers on how to help children who are victims of bullying:

  • Talk it out – Ask your child about concerns.
  • Learn – Get information from your child about what's happening.
  • Take notes – Record details of bullying events.
  • Discuss how to respond – Walk away. Get help from trusted adult or peer.
  • Build self-esteem – Encourage your child to get involved in positive activities.
  • Team up – Reach out to teachers.

If the bullying doesn't stop, contact the school or proper authorities.

Dr. Biggs says bullying comes in many forms: physical, verbal, emotional, social and online. Creating a culture of respect in and out of the classroom is key to bullying prevention.

Watch to hear Dr. Bridget Biggs

Journalists: Sound bites are in the downloads. 

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DebBalzer

Aug 15, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Building Routines

a group of young elementary school children with backpacks, getting on a school bus

For many kids, summer is a time to stay up late, sleep in and hang out with friends. Waking up for that first day of a new school year can be a shock if young children, teenagers and parents or caregivers have not come up with a routine.

Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside  says routines are good for everybody. He says, "Routines give us structure and help us complete the tasks and challenges we face each day."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website notes that routines help children know what to expect as the day unfolds. Dr. Whiteside says developing routines for morning, bedtime and any other recurring event can make things run more smoothly at home and at school. Each family should begin the transition into a back-to-school routine at least a week or two before the first bell rings.

Journalists: Sound bites are in the downloads. [TRT 1:07]

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DebBalzer

Aug 8, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Separation Anxiety, Fears and Stress

a sad elementary school girl on a bus

Getting ready for a new school year can be exciting for children, parents and caregivers. It may also be a major cause of anxiety or stress. Whether kids are heading off to elementary school, high school or college, leaving the safety and familiarity of home can prompt feelings of fear. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside says if back-to-school anxiety or separation anxiety become overwhelming and disruptive, taking steps to reduce those fears is important. "Some kids are more anxious than others, and transitions like going back to school can be more difficult for them," says Dr. Whiteside. "Talking to them and preparing them ahead of time by doing things such as visiting the schools and meeting teachers can be beneficial."

Dr. Whiteside offers additional tips that can help:

  • Tour school ahead of time –  classrooms, lockers, cafeteria, gymnasium
  • Be social – get in touch with school peers
  • Practice academic work
  • Develop a routine – wake up early to be ready on time
  • Spend time apart so kids and parents/caregivers can get used to being separated

If anxiety becomes severe, talk to your health care provider to be sure the anxiety is not caused by an underlying issue, such as a learning disability.

For parents who have separation anxiety from sending their child off to college, Dr. Whiteside recommends getting support by talking to others who have already gone through that transition.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads.

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DebBalzer

Aug 3, 2016 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Vaccinations and Immunizations Checklist

a child having just received a vaccination shot

It is the time of year for many parents and caregivers to make checklists to ensure children have the supplies they need for the school year. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatrician Dr. Robert Jacobson says vaccinations should definitely be on that list. He says they protect children from contracting and spreading diseases that could cause serious complications.

"Work done here at Mayo Clinic in the 1970s showed how severe chickenpox can be for some children," says Dr. Jacobson. " That research convinced experts throughout the country that we needed a chickenpox vaccine."

Dr. Jacobson says you should check to see that your school-age kids, including those going off to college, have vaccinations that are up to date.

Click here to find your state and school vaccination requirements.

Watch Dr. Jacobson discuss immunizations

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. 

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rhodamadson

Jul 18, 2016 by @rhodamadson · View  

Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Offers Physicals for Local High School Athletes

Foot and leg next to soccer ball

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine is offering sports physicals for area high school students who want to participate in athletic programs.

The exams will be performed Saturday, Aug. 6 from 8-11 a.m. at Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine, located on the third floor of the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, 565 1st St. SW., Rochester. Appointments are walk-ins only.

The exams are open to all athletes from local southeast Minnesota, western Wisconsin and northern Iowa schools. The exams follow the protocol set by the Minnesota State High School League.

Staff will include Mayo Clinic physicians and residents from the Departments of Orthopedic Surgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Internal Medicine and Family Medicine. Athletic trainers, physical therapists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants will also be on hand to help.

MEDIA CONTACT: Rhoda Madson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

The cost is $20 per student, payable by cash or check only. Forms for the physicals are available at high school athletic offices, school websites or at http://www.mshsl.org. Please complete these forms before Aug. 6 and bring the forms to the exam.

If an athlete wears glasses or contact lenses, please bring them to the exam. Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine recommends that athletes who have known medical conditions see their family care physicians.

For information, contact Chad Eickhoff, Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine, at 507-266-3461 or eickhoff.chad@mayo.edu.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to clinical practice, education and research, providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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debanderson

Mar 15, 2016 by @debanderson · View  

Mayo Clinic Schools Advance in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Grad School Rankings

Nurse Anesthesia program at Mayo School of Health SciencesROCHESTER, Minn. — U.S. News & World Report today released its 2017 rankings for Best Graduate Schools across the nation. Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences, two schools within Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, advanced significantly in the findings.

“We are competing with some of the largest, well-known universities in the nation,” says Mark Warner, M.D., Juanita Waugh Executive Dean for Education, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. “These high ratings reflect the commitment of our faculty to deliver the highest quality education to the extraordinary students who come to our schools.”

Mayo School of Health Sciences, which focuses on training allied health professionals, received high ratings for two of its graduate-level programs. New to the survey in 2016 are rankings for nurse anesthesia programs. Mayo’s program ranked as one of the top 10 Nurse Anesthesia training programs in the nation. The school’s Physical Therapy program moved up to garner a top 20 ranking among Best Health Schools.

“Providing the highest quality education to future health professionals is imperative,” says Michael Silber, M.B., Ch.B., Dean of Mayo’s School of Health Sciences. “With the looming physician shortage and the changing nature of health care, more and more emphasis is being placed on working in care teams – where the physician and well-trained allied health professionals each bring their expertise to the table to provide the best care for the patient.”

Dr. Silber shared that the school offers more than 125 programs, ranging from certificate level through doctorate level, and representing 55 health science careers. He notes that the school’s expert faculty, hands-on training and immersion in Mayo Clinic’s unique model of patient care and professionalism have built the school’s reputation and make graduates of these programs highly sought-after in the job market.

Long renowned for its medical degree training success, Mayo Medical School now ranks among the top 25 Best Medical Schools in the country for research, moving into 24th position according to the survey. Also showing a significant leap is the medical school’s primary care ranking at 32nd, up from 42nd last year.

Mayo’s progression in the Best Medical School rankings comes as no surprise to Michele Halyard, M.D., interim dean of Mayo Medical School. Along with other key differentiators, Dr. Halyard notes that many of the med students entering Mayo Medical School begin participating in research within their first two years and the school integrates research training into its third-year curriculum. Eighty percent of the school’s students – more than twice the national average – publish in peer-reviewed medical journals.

“We have outstanding physicians, physician scientists and dedicated researchers training the next generation of physicians to advance the science of medicine,” says Dr. Halyard. “And, while the majority of our students go on to medical specialty residencies, we also support the growing need for primary care physicians.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

Dr. Halyard points to several factors that influence Mayo Medical School’s advancement in the 2017 survey standings. It has the highest faculty-to-student ratio among medical schools at 16-to-1 and also was recognized by U.S. News & World Report in 2015 as one of the Top 10 Most Affordable Private Medical Schools.

In 2015, Mayo’s medical school became the first school in the nation to incorporate an innovative Science of Health Care Delivery curriculum, jointly developed with Arizona State University, into its four-year medical school curriculum. The school is also teaming with the American Medical Association’s Accelerating Change in Medical Education initiative to share its curricula advances with other medical schools around the country.

Dr. Halyard also notes that Mayo Medical School is expanding to a national footprint that will include the original medical school in Rochester, Minnesota, a four-year campus opening in Scottsdale/Phoenix, Arizona in 2017 and a third- and fourth-year program planned for Mayo’s Jacksonville, Florida campus. Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus will begin accepting applications for incoming first-year students on June 1, 2016.

“The culmination of these efforts is raising the visibility of our school and having a positive impact on our survey standings,” says Dr. Halyard.

The U.S. News & World Report statistical surveys are sent in late 2015 and early 2016 to more than 1,900 graduate program administrators and the reputational survey goes out to more than 18,400 academics and professionals representing educational programs in business, education, engineering, law, nursing and medicine. For Best Medical School rankings, data gathered gauge expert opinion of graduate school program excellence and statistical quality indicators for graduate school faculty, research and students. These include undergraduate GPA, median Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score, a school’s acceptance rate, faculty-to-student ratio, total institutional National Institutes of Health (NIH) research grants acquired and NIH research grants per faculty member. The Best Health School rankings are based on peer assessment. The full new rankings and data can be found on the U.S. News website.
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About Mayo School of Health Sciences
Each year, nearly 1,700 students enroll in more than 130 Mayo School of Health Sciences programs representing 55 health sciences careers. With a low student-to-faculty ratio, every student benefits from world-class instructors, innovative educational methods and extensive individualized training at Mayo Clinic, a premiere academic medical organization.

About Mayo Medical School
Originally established in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1972, Mayo Medical School is considered one of the most highly competitive medical schools in the country for admittance. Averaging more than 4,700 applications per year, Mayo Medical School traditionally accepts 54 students per enrolling class. With the opening of the Arizona campus in 2017, this enrollment will nearly double with 50 additional students on the new campus per year. The expansion to a national footprint will give the school the ability to deliver extraordinary medical education and highly diverse clinical experiences to students across all Mayo campuses.

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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KelleyLuckstein

Mar 10, 2016 by @KelleyLuckstein · View  

Media Advisory: Mayo Clinic to Host High School ‘Saving Lives with Gus’ Medical Seminar

Researcher and student in labROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic will host a hands-on medical seminar for local high school students on Monday, March 14.

WHO: David Farley, M.D., general surgeon at Mayo Clinic; nearly 125 high school students from Rochester, La Crescent, Minnesota, and Forest City, Iowa.

WHAT: A video series called “Saving Lives with Gus” was created by a team of surgical residents and simulation medicine fellows at Mayo Clinic to teach the general public simple things that can be done do to save lives. As an extension, the residents and fellows have created this seminar for high school students to get early exposure to the medical field. The students will have an opportunity to perform CPR on mannequins, use a defibrillator, perform an ultrasound and test their knot tying skills on a simulated vessel, along with many more opportunities.

“We hope it is a great opportunity for high school students to get hands-on experience with a variety of medical interventions,” says Dr. Farley. “In an ideal scenario, this effort helps save a life in the future and better informs and stimulates young learners to consider medicine as a potential career.”

WHERE: Phillips Hall, Siebens 1, Mayo Clinic, 100 Second Ave. SW, Rochester.

WHEN: Monday, March 14, 9 a.m. CDT.

Reporters should arrive by 8:50 a.m. CDT at the Information Desk, Gonda Lobby.

NOTE: Members of the media must RSVP to Kelley Luckstein, Public Affairs, at 507-284-5005.

MEDIA CONTACT: Kelley Luckstein, 507-284-5005, email: newsbureau@mayo.edu

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About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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micahdorfner

Mar 9, 2016 by @micahdorfner · View  

Keeping Your Kids Healthy at School

children at school lunch table, African-America boy eating an apple
Do you know why school kids get sick so often? In the early school years, your child’s immune system is put to the test. Young children in large groups tend to easily spread organisms that cause illness.

“Many childhood illnesses are caused by viruses,” says Tracy Warsing, M.D., Mayo Clinic Health System family physician. “All it takes is a single child to bring a virus to school for the spread to begin.”

What’s the best way to keep your child healthy in school? Frequent hand washing is the simplest and most effective way to stay healthy. Remind your child to wash his or her hands before eating and after going to the bathroom, blowing his or her nose, or playing outside. Kids should soap up for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice.

Dr. Warsing suggests these other tips for keeping kids healthy in school:

  • Give your child alcohol-based hand sanitizer to keep in his or her desk or backpack. Kids should use hand sanitizer before eating snacks or lunch and after using shared objects, such as a computer, pencil sharpener or water fountain.
  • Give your child a package of tissues to keep in his or her desk or backpack. Encourage your child to sneeze into a tissue. If a tissue is not available, he or she should cough or sneeze into the crook of his or her elbow.
  • Remind children to keep their hands away from their eyes and out of their mouths; hands are often covered in germs.
  • Remind children to not share water bottles, food or other personal items. Use this simple rule: If you put the item in your mouth, keep it to yourself.

"Last but not least, it’s also important for your child to eat a healthy diet, get plenty of sleep and stay current on his or her vaccinations in order to help fend off illness causing organisms," says Dr. Warsing.

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debanderson

Feb 1, 2016 by @debanderson · View  

Mayo School of Health Sciences Announces Career Immersion Program, July 11-15, 2016

Medical student looking through microscope

Area high school junior and senior applicants sought for the weeklong career exploration experience.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo School of Health Sciences is hosting its first Career Immersion Program for diverse high school juniors and seniors. The program, to be held July 11-15, 2016, includes a week of career exploration, supervised lodging and meals in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. Participants will meet with current students and professionals in a range of health science professions, network with Mayo Clinic faculty and learn the academic path for enrolling in accredited health science education programs.

The 2016 program will focus on laboratory medicine professions — specifically cytotechnology, genetic counseling, histology, medical laboratory science, molecular genetics, pathology and phlebotomy. Learn more about these and other health sciences careers at Mayo School of Health Sciences.

MEDIA CONTACT: Deb Anderson, Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Qualified students will be Minnesota juniors or seniors during the 2016-2017 school year, have GPAs of 2.75 or higher, and an expressed interest in health science professions. Completed applications are due by Friday, March 18, 2016, and must include:

• Completed online application form
• Current high school transcript
• One letter of recommendation from a science teacher, guidance counselor or principal
• A brief one page essay about the student’s interest in health sciences

Successful applicants will be notified in the spring.

Educators, parents and students can direct questions to mshsadministration@mayo.edu.

Mayo School of Health Sciences also has 16 health sciences certificate programs that welcome qualified undergraduate students.

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About Mayo School of Health Sciences
Mayo School of Health Sciences has been preparing students for successful careers in the health sciences for more than 100 years. Mayo School of Health Sciences strives to educate students who excel in academic achievement to become quality patient care providers. Nearly 800 students are enrolled annually in more than 60 Mayo School of Health Sciences programs representing 27 health sciences professions. The school’s nearly 300 faculty members ensure that students receive exceptional personalized training.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, whole-person care to everyone who needs healing. For more information,visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic, or http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/.

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DebBalzer

Aug 27, 2015 by @DebBalzer · View  

Back to School: Feed the Body and Brain

If your children participate in school sports, you know proper nutrition will help them perform at their best. The young girl, girl holding two apples over her eyessame holds true for academics. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatrician Dr. Brian Lynch says healthy, nutritious foods will benefit kids' academic performance, behavior and overall health. Plus, it will combat childhood obesity. Dr. Lynch and his colleagues encourage families to follow the 9-5-2-1-0 Let's Go! rule as a guide to good health and nutrition for kids:

  • 9 – get nine hours of sleep per night
  • 5 – eat five or more servings of fruit and vegetables every day
  • 2 – limit screen time to two hours per day
  • 1 – get one hour of exercise per day
  • 0 – drink zero sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice

Dr. Lynch says when it comes to feeding your children, avoid processed foods and foods containing trans fats, saturated fats, sugar and sodium. Instead, opt for more of what he calls "real" foods – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:58] Click here for the transcript.

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