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Deborah Balzer

Thu, Aug 27 at 3:44pm EDT by Deborah Balzer · View  

Back to School: Feed the Body and Brain

If your children participate in school sports, you know proper nutrition will help them perform at their best. The young girl, girl holding two apples over her eyessame holds true for academics. Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatrician Dr. Brian Lynch says healthy, nutritious foods will benefit kids' academic performance, behavior and overall health. Plus, it will combat childhood obesity. Dr. Lynch and his colleagues encourage families to follow the 9-5-2-1-0 Let's Go! rule as a guide to good health and nutrition for kids:

  • 9 – get nine hours of sleep per night
  • 5 – eat five or more servings of fruit and vegetables every day
  • 2 – limit screen time to two hours per day
  • 1 – get one hour of exercise per day
  • 0 – drink zero sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice

Dr. Lynch says when it comes to feeding your children, avoid processed foods and foods containing trans fats, saturated fats, sugar and sodium. Instead, opt for more of what he calls "real" foods – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:58] Click here for the transcript.

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Deborah Balzer

Tue, Aug 25 at 5:16pm EDT by Deborah Balzer · View  

Back to School: A Good Night's Sleep

Children need to get plenty of sleep in order to perform well in school. After a summer of staying up late and then young teenage boy asleep on his schoolbookssleeping in, many kids are out of their school year bedtime routines.  Mayo Clinic Children's Center pediatric neurologist and sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal says in order for most school-age children to be at their best, they need to get from 8 1/2 to 9 hours of sleep every night. He also says, "Children should work back into a school year sleep schedule gradually, starting a week or two before the first bell rings."

Dr. Kotagal has tips on how to help children and teens get the sleep they need for a productive school year.

  • Wake children up 30 minutes earlier every few days as school approaches
  • Turn off electronics 30 minutes to an hour before bed
  • Temporarily avoid or shorten naps to help children be sleepy at night
  • Make sure the bed is used for sleep only

 Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [2:29] Click here for the transcript.

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Deborah Balzer

Thu, Aug 20 at 11:58am EDT by Deborah Balzer · View  

Back to School: Sick Kids – Should They Stay or Should They Go?

sick little boy lying in bed with thermometer and teddy bear toyYour child is running a fever and you're running late to work. What do you do? Keep your child home or send him or her to school? When a child is truly sick from an infection such as a bad cold or flu, making sure he or she stays home is the best way to prevent the illness from getting worse or from spreading to others. Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist Dr. Pritish Tosh says, "Stopping the spread of an infectious disease is a combination of good hand hygiene and keeping sick people out of public areas."

Dr. Tosh says it is in the best interest of sick children and adults to be able to rest and recover.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:04 ] Click here for the transcript.

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Deborah Balzer

Tue, Aug 18 at 5:22pm EDT by Deborah Balzer · View  

Back to School: Building Routines

 wood blocks spelling out the word routineFor many kids, summer is a time to stay up late, sleep in and hang out with friends. Waking up for that first day of a new school year can be a shock if children, teens and parents or caregivers have not come up with a plan – a routine. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Stephen Whiteside  reminds us that routines are good for everybody. He says, "Routines give us structure and help us complete the tasks and challenges we face each day." The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's website notes that routines help children know what to expect as the day unfolds. Dr. Whiteside says developing routines for morning, bedtime and any other regularly occurring event can make things run more smoothly at home and at school. Each family should begin the transition into a back-to-school routine at least a week or two before the first bell rings.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [TRT 1:07] Click here for the transcript.

 

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Deborah Balzer

Mon, Aug 17 at 5:38pm EDT by Deborah Balzer · View  

Back to School: Know the Warning Signs of Bullying

For many children, the start of a new school year can be very stressful, especially if they've been victims of bullying in the past. Mayo Clinic Children's Center psychologist Dr. Bridget Biggs says parents and caregivers should know the warning signs. "If your child is reluctant to go to school, stressed after spending time online or avoids social situations, he or she may be being bullied." Dr. Biggs points out that consequences of bullying can be serious. Victims are at increased risk of depressionanxiety, sleep problems, self-harm, poor grades and in rare cases, suicide.

Dr. Biggs has tips for parents and caregivers on how to help children who are victims of bullying.word cloud with the words for school bullying

  • Talk it out – ask your child about concerns
  • Learn – get information from your child about what's happening
  • Take notes – record details of bullying events
  • Discuss how to respond – walk away, get help from trusted adult or peer
  • Build self-esteem – encourage your child to get involved in positive activities
  • Team up – reach out to teachers
  • If the bullying doesn't stop, contact the school or proper authorities

Dr. Biggs reminds us that bullying comes in many forms: physical, verbal, emotional, social and online. She says creating a culture of respect in and out of the classroom is key to bullying prevention.

Journalists: Sound bites are available in the downloads. [1:51] Click here for the transcript.

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Joel Streed

Mon, Aug 17 at 10:29am EDT by Joel Streed · View  

Sleep Needs/Vaccine Update/School Sports/Student Depression: Mayo Clinic Radio

The end of summer is fast approaching ... and millions of youngsters across the country are getting ready to return to the classroom. On this back-to-school edition of Mayo Clinic Radio, children's sleep specialist Dr. Suresh Kotagal outlines how muchsleep children need to be fully engaged in class. Also on the program, pediatrician and adolescent medicine specialist Dr. Robert Jacobson provides an update on vaccines. Sports medicine specialist Dr. David Soma talks about preparing for school sports. And psychiatrist Dr. Paul Croarkin has tips for parents on what to watch for when a child seems anxious or depressed.

Here's the podcast:MayoClinicRadio 08-15-15 PODCAST

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Joel Streed

Mon, Aug 17 at 9:01am EDT by Joel Streed · View  

School Nutrition: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, dietitian Kate Zeratsky offers some healthy tips on keeping your kids fueled for the day at school.

To listen, click the link below.

School Nutrition

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Joel Streed

Wed, Aug 12 at 11:00am EDT by Joel Streed · View  

Sleep and the School Year: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, sleep medicine specialist, Dr. Suresh Kotagal has tips on making sure your child gets the sleep they need to learn.

To listen, click the link below.

Sleep and the School Year

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