Mayo Clinic News Network

News Resources

Uncategorized Archive

October 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Cause of ischemic colitis often unclear

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What exactly is ischemic colitis? Do doctors know what causes it?

ANSWER: Ischemic colitis occurs when blood flow to part of the large intestine (colon) is reduced due to one of two reasons: either there is a blocked or narrowed blood vessel (occlusive), or there is a temporary decrease in blood flow to the colon  (nonoillustration of abdomin highlighting colon and ischemic colitiscclusive). Ninety-five percent of cases of ischemic colitis are due to a nonocclusive mechanism. When this occurs, cells in the digestive system don’t receive sufficient oxygen which then leads to areas of colon inflammation and ulceration. While the exact cause of ischemic colitis is often unclear, with proper medical care, most people diagnosed with ischemic colitis typically recover in a day or two and never have another episode.

Even under normal circumstances, the colon receives less blood flow than any other portion of the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, if the colon is suddenly subjected to reduced blood flow — whatever the reason — its tissues may be damaged. The severity of damage varies depending on the amount of time that the blood flow was interrupted and the degree to which it was decreased. In rare cases, patients can suffer a perforation (tear) of the colon, which requires surgical treatment. Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: abdominal pain, atherosclerosis, bloody diarrhea, colonoscopy, Diverticulitis, Dr Sarah Umar, Dr Umar, flexible sigmoidoscopy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, ischemic colitis, Weekend Wellness


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Radiation Reduction: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

Radiation is often a necessary evil in the diagnosis and treatment of many medical issues.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Amy Hara discusses efforts to lower radiation exposure.

To listen, click the link below.

Radiation Reduction

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Dr. AMy Hara, Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, podcast, radiation


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Clear Questions and Answers About Ebola

By Dana Sparks

 EBola NIHNational Institutes of Health (NIH)

Risk factors  By Mayo Clinic Staff

For most people, the risk of getting Ebola or Marburg viruses (hemorrhagic fevers) is low. The risk increases if you:

  • Travel to Africa. You're at increased risk if you visit or work in areas where Ebola virus or Marburg virus outbreaks have occurred.
  • Conduct animal research. People are more likely to contract the Ebola or Marburg virus if they conduct animal research with monkeys imported from Africa or the Philippines.
  • Provide medical or personal care. Family members are often infected as they care for sick relatives. Medical personnel also can be infected if they don't use protective gear, such as surgical masks and gloves.
  • Prepare people for burial. The bodies of people who have died of Ebola or Marburg hemorrhagic fever are still contagious. Helping prepare these bodies for burial can increase your risk of developing the disease.

Signs and symptoms typically begin abruptly within five to 10 days of infection with Ebola or Marburg virus. 
Learn more: Ebola virus and Marburg virus

Mayo Clinic was monitoring the evolving Ebola situation well before the first U.S. case was diagnosed on Sept. 30. The institution is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  and state health departments. Mayo Clinic is fully prepared to screen, evaluate and treat patients suspected to have Ebola. That said, at this time, there are no confirmed or suspected cases of Ebola across the institution. While Ebola continues to dominate news coverage, and there is reason for concern, you should not overreact or panic.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: CDC, Ebola Virus, Infectious Disease, NIH


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

middle-aged man exercising and stretching near ocean

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 18 at 9 a.m. CT, the topic is Men's Health. Two physicians from the new Mayo Clinic Men's Health Program in Arizona will be here to discuss endocrine issues like diabetes and thyroid health. Other topics will include low testosterone and how prostate and sexual health relate to cardiovascular health.  Urologist Jason Jameson, M.D., and cardiologist David Simper, M.D., will join us. Hope you do, too!

Myth or Fact:  Men experience their own type of menopause.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment October 18, 2014 (right click MP3)

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Diabetes, Dr David Simper, Dr Jason Jameson, Mayo Clinic Radio, Men's Health, Thyroid


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Alternative Medicine for Cancer Patient Fatigue

By Dana Sparks

Blue and white banner logo for 'Living with Cancer' blog

Alternative Medicine for Fatiguemiddle-aged couple doing yoga outside on a grassy lawn
Many breast cancer survivors experience fatigue during and after treatment, that can continue for years.

Can bleeding problems during chemotherapy be prevented?
When you have low levels of platelets due to chemotherapy, you bleed and bruise more easily. Here's how to lower your risk of bleeding.

Tips on balancing cancer treatment, desire to work
Work can be a good distraction from thinking about cancer, and it can keep you motivated.

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Chemotherapy, Fatigue, Living With Cancer Blog


October 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Controlar la infección por enterovirus D68

By Emily Hiatt

Escrito por Greg Brown, especialista noticioso de Mayo Clinic

Una madre sostiene el termómetro y en el trasfondo aparece un niño enfermo en camaSegún los Centros para el Control y Prevención de las Enfermedades (CDC, por sus siglas en inglés), las infecciones por enterovirus son comunes durante los meses del verano y otoño, pero los hospitales de todo Estados Unidos están atendiendo a más niños de lo normal que presentan enfermedades respiratorias graves producidas por el enterovirus D68. El CDC está controlando la situación y ayuda a examinar las muestras. Los proveedores de atención médica deben considerar una infección por enterovirus D68 en los niños pequeños que se presentan con enfermedades respiratorias graves o debilidad muscular inexplicable, aparte de informar a los departamentos de salud estatal respecto a cualquier aumento inusual en los casos.

A pesar de que no exista ninguna vacuna ni medicamento específico para tratar la infección por enterovirus, se puede ofrecer a los niños atención de apoyo, incluso oxígeno, o administrarles tratamientos respiratorios y líquidos en caso necesario.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: asma, CDC, Consejos de salud, Dr W Charles Huskins, En español, enterovirus, Enterovirus D68, espanol, infección respiratoria, spanish


October 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Fecal Transplant for C-Difficile: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

Just the thought is enough to make some people cringe.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Sahil Khanna explains how a fecal transplant can help battle a nasty infection.

To listen, click the link below.

Fecal Transplant for CDIFF

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: C.difficile, Dr. Sahil Khanna, fecal transplant, Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, podcast


October 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

THURSDAY CONSUMER HEALTH TIPS

By Dana Sparks

person getting flu shot in arm
Flu shots: Especially important if you have heart disease

Barrett's esophagus

Pain and depression: Is there a link?

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Barrett's Esophagus, Cardiomyopathy, Depression, Flu Shot, IBD, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Thursday Consumer Health Tips, Vaccination


October 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Nuevas pautas en pruebas genéticas para ciertos tipos de distrofia muscular

By Emily Hiatt

Es importante saber el subtipo específico para ofrecer la mejor atención médica posible

ROCHESTER, Minnesota: La Academia Americana de Neurología (AAN, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Asociación Americana  de Medicina Neuromuscular y Electrodiagnóstico (AANEM, por sus siglas en inglés) ofrecen nuevas pautas para determinar qué pruebas genéticas serían mejores para diagnosticar el subtipo personal de distrofia muscular de la cintura pélvica y/o escapular o de Hombre en silla de ruedas frente a la entrada adaptada del hospitaldistrofia muscular distal. Las pautas se publicaron en la edición impresa del 14 de octubre de Neurology®, la revista médica de la Academia Americana de Neurología.

Como parte del proceso de desarrollar las nuevas pautas, los científicos revisaron todos los estudios disponibles sobre la distrofia muscular, que abarca a un grupo de enfermedades genéticas en las que las fibras musculares son extraordinariamente susceptibles a sufrir daños.

Los médicos deben realizar una evaluación minuciosa de los síntomas, de los antecedentes familiares, de la etnicidad y de los resultados del examen físico y de ciertos análisis de laboratorio para determinar qué pruebas genéticas sería más adecuado solicitar.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: distrofia muscular, Dra Duygu Selcen, En español, espanol, pruebas genéticas, spanish, Spanish News Release


October 16th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Ambas cifras de la presión arterial son importantes para la salud general

By Emily Hiatt

ESTIMADA MAYO CLINIC:
Tengo alta la presión sistólica (primera cifra), pero normal la presión diastólica (segunda cifra). ¿Qué significa esto? ¿Se considera hipertensión? ¿Necesito algún tratamiento?

Ilustración de la presión arterial sistólica (sístole) y de la presión arterial diastólica (diástole)RESPUESTA:
Al medir la presión arterial, ambas cifras son importantes para la salud general. Cuando la presión sistólica es alta, aunque la presión diastólica sea normal, el riesgo para varios problemas de salud aumenta y es necesario lidiar con la situación. Si bien los medicamentos para la presión arterial pueden ayudar, en ciertos casos todo el tratamiento necesario puede ser realizar cambios en el estilo de vida para reducir la presión arterial sistólica a un nivel más sano.

La presión arterial es la medida de la presión dentro de las arterias cuando el corazón bombea sangre. La medición de la presión arterial es un medio importante que permite al médico controlar la salud general. La presión arterial se lee en milímetros de mercurio (mmHg) y se compone de dos cifras: la primera cifra mide la presión en las arterias cuando el corazón late, y se conoce como presión sistólica; mientras que la segunda cifra mide la presión en las arterias cuando el corazón late, y se conoce como presión diastólica.

Tradicionalmente, los médicos prestaban más atención a la presión diastólica que a la sistólica porque creían que el cuerpo podía tolerar aumentos ocasionales en la presión sistólica, pero que una presión diastólica constantemente alta podía conducir a problemas de salud. Sin embargo, las investigaciones más contemporáneas han demostrado que tanto la presión sistólica como la diastólica deben encontrarse constantemente dentro del rango normal para reducir los riesgos médicos vinculados a la hipertensión.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: En español, espanol, hipertensión, Preguntas y respuestas, presión arterial, presión arterial diastólica, presión arterial sistólica, spanish