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July 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Radio: Shoulder Problems

By McCray

If you have shoulder problems the next Mayo Clinic Radio is for you!  On Saturday, July 26, at 9 a.m. CT, John Sperling, M.D., will join us to discuss the many causes of shoulder pain.  What do you know about shoulder bursitistendinitis and something called Wiiitis? How are torn rotator cuffs diagnosed and repaired? We'll discuss a new option for patients with arthritis called reverse arthroplasty.  Join us!

Myth or Fact:  Rotator cuff tears can heal without surgery.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

To listen to Mayo Clinic Radio live, go to our flagship station, KROC AM.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

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July 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Kids and Bone Health: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Ed Laskowski explains why when it comes to kids and bone health, it's good to start saving for a rainy day.

To listen, click the link below.

Kids and Bone Health

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July 23rd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

21st Century Cures Roundtable on Personalized Medicine

By Dana Sparks

Dr. Frank Cockerill LIVE at Capitol Hill roundtable on personalized medicine


Frank Cockerill, M.D.
, chair of the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, is participating in a roundtable discussion hosted by the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee today, Wednesday, July 23, at 10 a.m ET.  

Click for LIVE stream.   Go to Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories for more information.

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July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Study Suggests Caffeine Intake May Worsen Menopausal Hot Flashes, Night Sweats

By Ginger Plumbo

Study also shows that caffeine may help mood and memory in perimenopausal women

ROCHESTER, Minn. — A new Mayo Clinic study, published online today by the journal Menopause, found an association between caffeine intake and more bothersome hot flashes and night sweats in postmenopausal women. The study also showed an association between caffeine intake and fewer problems with mood, memory and concentration in perimenopausal women, possibly because caffeine is known to enhance arousal, mood and attention. The findings of this largest study to date on caffeine and menopausal symptoms are published on the Menopause website and will also be printed in a future issue of the journal.

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July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Breast Cancer Sisters: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, two sisters take very different approaches to breast cancer.

To listen, click the link below.

Breast Cancer Sisters

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July 22nd, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q and A: Many conditions result in dementia, but Alzheimer’s is most common

By lizatorborg

Alzheimer's disease definition highlighted in dictionaryDEAR MAYO CLINIC: What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease? Are they hereditary?

ANSWER: Dementia is a broad term used to describe a group of symptoms that interferes with a person's thinking and the ability to function well in day-to-day activities. Many conditions can result in dementia, but Alzheimer’s disease is, by far, the most common. Because so many factors can lead to dementia, one cannot say that dementia, the syndrome, is hereditary. Rather, subtypes of dementia (for example, Alzheimer’s disease) may have inherited components. A rare form of Alzheimer’s disease is truly inherited, but that accounts for only 1 percent of the total disease. Typical Alzheimer’s disease, however, does have a tendency to run in families, and there are genetic tendencies.

Dementia is defined by its symptoms, with memory loss being one of the most frequent. Just because a person has some memory loss, though, doesn’t necessarily mean he or she has dementia. A diagnosis of dementia typically means a person is having problems with at least two brain functions. That may include, for example, memory loss as well as impaired judgment or problems with language. These may in turn lead to difficulty performing routine tasks, such as paying bills or driving to a familiar location without getting lost. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Dana Sparks

Housecall Banner blue and white

Heart attack word cloudTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Cancer causes: Popular myths about the causes of cancer
Myths about secret cancer causes may lead you to worry about your own health and the health of your family. Before you panic, take a look at the facts.

Heart attack symptoms: Know what's a medical emergency
Besides chest pain, do you know the signs of a heart attack? Watch for these symptoms.

Carbohydrates: How carbs fit into a healthy diet
Carbohydrates have numerous health benefits. In fact, your body needs them to function. But some carbs may be better for you than others.

EXPERT ANSWERSgreen leaves of a Ginkgo tree
Ginkgo biloba: Can it prevent memory loss?
Ginkgo biloba is said to prevent memory loss, but study results suggest otherwise.

Salt craving: A symptom of Addison's disease?
Excessive salt craving may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as Addison's disease

Late-day exercise: Can it cause insomnia?
For some people, exercising within a few hours of bedtime may cause problems getting to sleep.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Widowhood may delay dementia, Mayo Clinic study says

By Jim McVeigh

handsPHOENIX — A new Mayo Clinic study suggests that the care and support family members give to elderly widows following the death of their spouse may be a factor in delaying dementia.

The study presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark last week was designed to evaluate the effects of widowhood in people with mild cognitive impairment - a precursor of dementia.  The thinking had been that widowhood would accelerate the development of dementia in people with MCI but the study showed the opposite.

Mayo Clinic researchers used data on more than 3,500 people from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center database, which compiles information collected at various Alzheimer’s disease Centers in the U.S. The researchers found that of the 1,078 subjects who developed dementia, people who remained married developed dementia at a younger age than those who were widowed (83 years old versus 92 years). Read the rest of this entry »

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Four Tricks to Save Yourself from Ticks

By Dana Sparks

News from Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Summer fun often includes hiking, biking, and just enjoying the great outdoors. But hanging out in parks or walking on trails also invites ticks to hop a ride. Below are four tips from the Mayo Clinic Parasitology Laboratory for arming yourself against these unwanted visitors: 

1. Use repellants that contain 20 to 30 percent DEET or 20 percent picaridin: Bobbi Pritt, M.D., clinical microbiologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, says that applying repellant to exposed skin and clothing will provide protection for several hours. “You can also wear clothing treated with permethrin to keep bugs away,” adds Dr. Pritt. 

2. Wear long sleeves and tuck pants into socks: Covering your body and sealing off “entry points” from little critters helps prevent bites. Dr. Pritt also suggests wearing light-colored clothing to make it easier to spot ticks. 

3. Avoid areas where ticks are prevalent: When hiking, stay in the middle of the trail and avoid areas with high grass or leaf litter. 

4. Check yourself carefully for ticks, removing any right away using small forceps: When you get back from a hike or picnic, make sure you check yourself carefully for ticks. “Ticks can transmit important disease-causing organisms to humans and pets,” says Dr. Pritt, “It’s vital to remove any attached ticks right away using forceps.”

Journalists: Video is available in the downloads.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Andy Tofilon, Mayo Medical Laboratories, 507-538-5245, newsbureau@mayo.edu

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July 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Procedures for Hemorrhoids: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Mark Larson outlines some courses of treatment to get rid of hemorrhoids.

To listen, click the link below.

Procedures for Hemorrhoids

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