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October 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Mayo Clinic Radio: Breast Cancer Awareness

By McCray

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and on the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 25 at 9 a.m. CT, two Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic physicians will be with us to discuss the latest in research and the ongoing efforts to diagnose, treat and prevent breast cancer. Director of the Breast Clinic Karthik Ghosh, M.D., and practice chair of the Medical Oncology Breast Group Tufia Haddad, M.D., will be ready  to answer your questions. Please join us.

Myth or Fact: Breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

For a look at future program topics, click here.
To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

 

 

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Tags: Breast Cancer, Dr Karthik Ghosh, Dr Tufia Haddad, Mayo Clinic Radio, Radio


October 21st, 2014

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By Audrey Caseltine

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Tags: Mayo Clinic Radio, Radio


October 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Men’s Health: Mayo Clinic Radio

By Joel Streed

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio,  the topic is Men's Health. Two physicians from the new Mayo Clinic Men's Health Program in Arizona discuss endocrine issues like diabetes and thyroid health. Other topics will include low testosterone and how prostate and sexual health relate to cardiovascular health.  Urologist Jason Jameson, M.D., and cardiologist David Simper, M.D., join us. Hope you do, too.

Here's the podcast: Mayo Clinic Radio Full Show 10-18-2014

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Tags: Dr David Simper, Mayo Clinic Radio, Men's Health Dr Jason Jameson, podcast


October 21st, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Tuesday Q and A: For most, enterovirus D68 causes only mild symptoms

By lizatorborg

shutterstock_142939915DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Why is it that children are the ones most affected by the enterovirus? I have read that it starts with mild cold symptoms, so how will I know when it’s time to see a doctor? What symptoms should I look for in my children?

ANSWER: There are many forms of enteroviruses. The one making headlines now is called enterovirus D68. This virus most often affects children and teens because their bodies have not built up immunity to it yet. In most cases, enterovirus D68 causes only mild symptoms. But it can become severe in some people. If your child has severe cold symptoms, or if symptoms get progressively worse, make an appointment to see your doctor. If a child has problems breathing, seek medical care right away.

Enteroviruses can cause a wide range of infections, depending on the strain of the virus that is involved. Some can be very serious, such as the enterovirus strain that leads to viral meningitis, while others tend to be only a nuisance, such as those that cause the common cold.

Enterovirus D68 is not new. It was first identified about 50 years ago. The virus is of concern because it appears to be more aggressive than most of the other enterovirus strains that result in respiratory illness. That means people who have existing medical conditions that affect their respiratory systems, particularly asthma, are at higher risk for more severe symptoms and complications as a result of enterovirus D68.

Enteroviruses are common, so most adults have been exposed to them at some point during their lives. Because these viruses tend to be mild — some do not cause symptoms at all — many people may not realize they have been affected. But that exposure allows the body’s immune system to build up protection against the virus. When those people are exposed to it again, the virus has little or no effect.

Many children and teens have not been exposed to enterovirus D68 in the past. As a result, their bodies have not had a chance to develop the immunity necessary to protect them from the illness, and they are more prone to develop symptoms.

Symptoms of enterovirus D68 are often similar to those of the common cold: cough, runny nose, sneezing, fever and muscle aches. In many people, even children and teens who are affected for the first time, the virus does not progress beyond these symptoms. In such cases, no treatment is needed, and the virus goes away on its own within a few days.

For a minority of people who get the virus, though, symptoms can become severe, and they may develop breathing difficulty. When this happens, immediate medical attention is required. Although uncommon, some patients with severe breathing problems may need to be hospitalized.

You can take steps to help keep your children from getting enteroviruses. Encourage them to wash their hands regularly with soap and water. Teach them to cover their coughs and sneezes with the inside of an arm, rather than their hands. Clean and disinfect surfaces in your house often, especially in the kitchen and bathrooms. As much as possible, keep your children away from people who are sick. If your kids start to develop symptoms, keep them home from school or child care until they feel better.

If you have questions or concerns about a child’s symptoms, contact your health care provider. He or she can help you decide on the best plan of care. And remember, if at any point a child has difficulty breathing or develops other severe symptoms, seek medical care right away. Pritish Tosh, M.D., Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

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Tags: Asthma, common cold, Dr Pritish Tosh, Dr Tosh, enterovirus, Enterovirus D68, Tuesday Q & A, viral meningitis


October 20th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Rural Breast Cancer Treatment Study: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

October is breast cancer awareness month.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Elizabeth Habermann comments on a study which found treatment disparities between rural and urban breast cancer patients.

To listen, click the link below.

Urban Rural Breast Cancer Treatment

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Tags: Breast Cancer, Dr Elizabeth Habermann, Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, podcast


October 20th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Monday’s Housecall

By Dana Sparks

HousecallBanner
THIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Tips for dining in or out safely when you have food allergiesfamily eating in restaurant with mother feeding baby
Having a food allergy means taking precautions at mealtime. Learn about safe food handling and preparation when you're at home or away.

Medication errors: Cut your risk with these tips
Medication errors and mistakes injure many people each year. Get tips on how to protect yourself.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Acne scars: What's the best treatment?
Various procedures can improve acne scars, but no single treatment is best for everyone.

Vitamin B-12 injections for weight loss: Do they work?
A weight-loss shot sounds appealing, but there's no solid evidence that vitamin B-12 injections work.

Click here to get a free e-subscription to the Housecall newsletter.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Eye injury: Tips to protect vision
Video: New hep C treatment
Bladder control problems: Medications for treating urinary incontinence
Slide show: Weight training exercises

HEALTHY RECIPES
Sweet-potato waffles with blueberry syrup
Granola with raisins, apples and cinnamon
Spinach frittata
Fresh fruit smoothie

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Don't believe shaving myths
Contrary to popular belief, shaving hair doesn't make it grow back thicker. And shaving doesn't affect how dark your hair is or how fast it grows. You can generally thank genetics and hormones for hair color, location, thickness and growth.

NOW BLOGGING
Nutrition-wise: Address addictive behaviors
Look at your lifestyle, including how much you eat and drink. If you see signs of addictive behaviors, take action to address them.

 

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Tags: acne scars, Bladder Control, Eye Injury, Food Allergies, Hep C, Medication Errors, Monday's Housecall


October 18th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Weekend Wellness: Cause of ischemic colitis often unclear

By lizatorborg

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What exactly is ischemic colitis? Do doctors know what causes it?

ANSWER: Ischemic colitis occurs when blood flow to part of the large intestine (colon) is reduced due to one of two reasons: either there is a blocked or narrowed blood vessel (occlusive), or there is a temporary decrease in blood flow to the colon  (nonoillustration of abdomin highlighting colon and ischemic colitiscclusive). Ninety-five percent of cases of ischemic colitis are due to a nonocclusive mechanism. When this occurs, cells in the digestive system don’t receive sufficient oxygen which then leads to areas of colon inflammation and ulceration. While the exact cause of ischemic colitis is often unclear, with proper medical care, most people diagnosed with ischemic colitis typically recover in a day or two and never have another episode.

Even under normal circumstances, the colon receives less blood flow than any other portion of the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, if the colon is suddenly subjected to reduced blood flow — whatever the reason — its tissues may be damaged. The severity of damage varies depending on the amount of time that the blood flow was interrupted and the degree to which it was decreased. In rare cases, patients can suffer a perforation (tear) of the colon, which requires surgical treatment.

Reduced blood flow to the colon may occur for a variety of reasons. One cause is narrowing of arteries serving the colon, which is often associated with the buildup of fatty deposits (atherosclerosis). More commonly, decreased blood pressure due to heart disease, severe illness, various medications, cocaine use or hemodialysis can decrease blood flow to the colon and cause an episode of ischemic colitis. Patients who participate in strenuous exercise can develop ischemia, likely due to a combination of dehydration and diversion of blood away from the colon to more vital parts of the body.

In addition, abdominal surgeries that require clamping off arteries that supply the colon with blood — such as during repair of an aortic aneurysm — may result in ischemic colitis. Blood clots in the vessels supplying the colon may be due to an underlying clotting disorder or could have traveled from another part of the body, such as the heart.

While the vast majority of people who develop ischemic colitis are older than 55, younger patients also can develop this condition. When it occurs in younger patients, a potential clotting disorder should be investigated.

The most common symptoms of ischemic colitis are abdominal pain — typically on the left side of the abdomen — and bloody diarrhea, which usually develops within 24 hours of the onset of pain. If a CT scan is performed, results can be normal or can show typical findings of bowel wall thickening (often in the left, but occasionally involving the right colon). Bowel wall thickening is a nonspecific finding, however, that could also be the result of a bacterial infection of the colon, diverticulitis, or due to an autoimmune condition called inflammatory bowel disease.

The gold standard to diagnose ischemic colitis is an evaluation with either flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. These tests can directly evaluate the lining of the colon, and also can be used to obtain samples (biopsies) of the colon tissue.

Ischemic colitis tends to improve without treatment in 24 to 48 hours. In more severe cases, however, treatment may involve a day or two in the hospital for observation, intravenous fluids, and supportive care. Antibiotics also may be given in severe cases. For most people, the colon heals completely in about two weeks; healing in a small percentage of people may take longer. Sarah Umar, M.D., Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz.

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Tags: abdominal pain, atherosclerosis, bloody diarrhea, colonoscopy, Diverticulitis, Dr Sarah Umar, Dr Umar, flexible sigmoidoscopy, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, ischemic colitis, Weekend Wellness


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Radiation Reduction: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute

By Joel Streed

Radiation is often a necessary evil in the diagnosis and treatment of many medical issues.  In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, Dr. Amy Hara discusses efforts to lower radiation exposure.

To listen, click the link below.

Radiation Reduction

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Tags: Dr. AMy Hara, Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, podcast, radiation


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Clear Questions and Answers About Ebola

By Dana Sparks

 EBola NIHNational Institutes of Health (NIH)

Risk factors  By Mayo Clinic Staff

For most people, the risk of getting Ebola or Marburg viruses (hemorrhagic fevers) is low. The risk increases if you:

  • Travel to Africa. You're at increased risk if you visit or work in areas where Ebola virus or Marburg virus outbreaks have occurred.
  • Conduct animal research. People are more likely to contract the Ebola or Marburg virus if they conduct animal research with monkeys imported from Africa or the Philippines.
  • Provide medical or personal care. Family members are often infected as they care for sick relatives. Medical personnel also can be infected if they don't use protective gear, such as surgical masks and gloves.
  • Prepare people for burial. The bodies of people who have died of Ebola or Marburg hemorrhagic fever are still contagious. Helping prepare these bodies for burial can increase your risk of developing the disease.

Signs and symptoms typically begin abruptly within five to 10 days of infection with Ebola or Marburg virus. 
Learn more: Ebola virus and Marburg virus

Mayo Clinic was monitoring the evolving Ebola situation well before the first U.S. case was diagnosed on Sept. 30. The institution is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  and state health departments. Mayo Clinic is fully prepared to screen, evaluate and treat patients suspected to have Ebola. That said, at this time, there are no confirmed or suspected cases of Ebola across the institution. While Ebola continues to dominate news coverage, and there is reason for concern, you should not overreact or panic.

How is Mayo preparing?

In preparation for potential Ebola patients, Mayo is:

  • Refining its protocols and communicating timely updates to established protocols
  • Implementing CDC infection control recommendations, including strict adherence to guidelines pertaining to donning and removing personal protective equipment
  • Providing employee training
  • Holding simulations to test and adjust procedures
  • Providing Ebola screening tools to those staffing nurse lines
  • Asking patients about their travel history

Mayo Clinic leadership is confident that patients who present at a Mayo facility with Ebola-like symptoms will be properly screened and evaluated, and those who are ill and have traveled to an affected West African country within the past three weeks will be rapidly identified, isolated and triaged. The institution has a detailed and thorough plan for patient care and protecting employees that can be implemented quickly. These plans have been shared widely across the institution.

Ebola

 

 

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Tags: CDC, Ebola Virus, Infectious Disease, NIH


October 17th, 2014 · Leave a Comment

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

By Dana Sparks

middle-aged man exercising and stretching near ocean

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio, Saturday, October 18 at 9 a.m. CT, the topic is Men's Health. Two physicians from the new Mayo Clinic Men's Health Program in Arizona will be here to discuss endocrine issues like diabetes and thyroid health. Other topics will include low testosterone and how prostate and sexual health relate to cardiovascular health.  Urologist Jason Jameson, M.D., and cardiologist David Simper, M.D., will join us. Hope you do, too!

Myth or Fact:  Men experience their own type of menopause.

Follow #MayoClinicRadio and tweet your questions.

To listen to the program on Saturday, click here.

Mayo Clinic Radio is available on iHeart Radio.

Listen to this week’s Medical News Headlines: News Segment October 18, 2014 (right click MP3)

Mayo Clinic Radio is a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic. The show is taped for rebroadcast by some affiliates.

For a look at future program topics, click here.
To find and listen to archived shows, click here.

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Tags: Diabetes, Dr David Simper, Dr Jason Jameson, Mayo Clinic Radio, Men's Health, Thyroid