• By Deb Balzer

1 year of COVID-19 vaccines at Mayo Clinic

December 17, 2021
several laboratory vials labeled COVID-19 Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine in a delivery box

It’s been one year since hope arrived at Mayo Clinic in form of a vaccine to help slow the spread of COVID-19 infection. Since December of 2020, Mayo Clinic has administered approx. 320,000 COVID-19 vaccines throughout its campuses in Rochester, Phoenix, Jacksonville, and Mayo Clinic Health System.

Along with vaccinations, Mayo Clinic has cared for roughly 140,000 patients with COVID-19 and monitored 103,000 virtually through the COVID-19 front-line care team, tested nearly 2 million patients, and provided more than 20,000 monoclonal antibody infusions. Of those monoclonal antibody infusions, 16,000 were administered in the Midwest, including 10,000 in rural communities throughout southern Minnesota and western Wisconsin.

“One of the most important things we do when we represent Mayo Clinic is modeling good behaviors for our communities," says Dr. John O'Horo, an infectious diseases specialist at Mayo Clinic. "Getting vaccinated, wearing masks, socially distancing and getting tested when appropriate have blunted the spread of COVID-19.  We have come far and sacrificed a lot to get to where we are. These same things can and will continue to save lives through the last parts of the pandemic.”

Watch: Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine arrives at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. December 17, 2020.

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video is available in the downloads at the end of the post. Please courtesy "Mayo Clinic News Network."

Watch: Mayo Clinic Rochester staff receive vaccinations December 18, 2020.

Journalists: Broadcast-quality video is available in the downloads at the end of the post. Please courtesy "Mayo Clinic News Network."

Related posts from December of 2020:


For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

Information in this post was accurate at the time of its posting. Due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific understanding, along with guidelines and recommendations, may have changed since the original publication date.

For more information and all your COVID-19 coverage, go to the Mayo Clinic News Network and mayoclinic.org.

Learn more about tracking COVID-19 and COVID-19 trends.

Dec. 19, 2021 - Mayo Clinic COVID-19 trending map using red color tones for hot spots