• By Laurel Kelly

Housecall: Don’t let jet lag drag you down

December 31, 2018

a stack of suitcases in front of large windows and a plane taking off into the sunsetTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Jet lag disorder
If you have travel plans in the new year, whether for work or play, don't let jet lag get in your way. Jet lag, also called jet lag disorder, is a temporary sleep problem that can affect anyone who travels across multiple time zones. Symptoms include daytime fatigue, an unwell feeling, difficulty staying alert and gastrointestinal problems. A few basic steps may prevent jet lag or reduce its effects. Here's what you need to know.

Job satisfaction: How to make work more rewarding
Do you find yourself dreading the start of the workweek or wishing the workday away? Are you no longer enthusiastic about your job? Whether your work is a job, a career or a calling, you can take steps to restore its meaning. Make the best of difficult work situations by maintaining a positive attitude. Be creative as you think of ways to change your circumstances — or how you view your circumstances. Doing so can help you manage your stress and experience the rewards of your profession. Try these strategies to help breathe new life into your job.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Do natural diuretics work?
Some herbs and dietary supplements have diuretic properties and may help with sodium and water retention. Examples include dandelion, ginger, parsley, hawthorn and juniper. But proceed with caution before taking any products that have a diuretic effect. Because fluid retention can be caused by a number of medical conditions and some medications, it's important to talk to your health care provider about possible causes before you try to treat it yourself. Also, some herbs and supplements can worsen medical problems or interact with medications. Learn more from Katherine Zeratsky, a Mayo Clinic registered dietitian nutritionist.

What is HER2-positive breast cancer?
HER2-positive breast cancer is a breast cancer that tests positive for a protein called "human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)." This protein promotes the growth of cancer cells. While HER2-positive breast cancers tend to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer, treatments that specifically target it are effective, and the prognosis is good. Learn more from Dr. Timothy Moynihan, an emeritus Mayo Clinic oncologist.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Video: 'Transplant Advances'
Polymyositis
Wet macular degeneration
Frostbite: First aid

HEALTHY RECIPES
Stuffed chicken breasts
Braised celery root
Crab salad
Warm chocolate pudding

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Fitness tip: Get physical at home
Time spent at home doesn't have to be couch potato time. Fit more physical activity into your home life with these tips:

  1. Wake up 30 minutes early. Use the extra time to walk on your treadmill or take a brisk walk through your neighborhood.
  2. Gather a group. Ask friends or family to join you for a walk after dinner or on a Saturday morning.
  3. Be active while watching TV. Use resistance bands or do pushups or squats during your favorite show.
  4. Involve the whole family. Ride your bikes. Take a trip to the pool. Have fun.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover more healthy lifestyle topics at mayoclinic.org.

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