• By Laurel J. Kelly

Housecall: Putting beans on the menu

July 24, 2017

a display of red lentils, yellow bulgur and green split peas, in stacked wooden bowls and small scoops, all on a background of rough woodTHIS WEEK'S TOP STORIES
Beans and other legumes: Cooking tips
Beans, peas, lentils and other legumes are among the most versatile foods available. And legumes are a nutritious addition to your diet, as they are low in fat; high in protein, folate, potassium, iron, magnesium and fiber; and have no cholesterol. If you want to add more beans and other legumes to your diet, but you aren't clear about what's available and how to prepare them, this guide can help.

Supporting a terminally ill loved one
Knowing how to comfort and support a loved one who's facing the end of life can be challenging. What should you say or do? How will you deal with your own grief? Here are some ideas for supporting a loved one who is terminally ill.

EXPERT ANSWERS
Does sunscreen expire?
Is leftover sunscreen from last summer still OK to use? It may be, but it may not, and using sunscreen that's no longer effective may leave you at risk for skin damage. Learn more from Dr. Lawrence Gibson, a Mayo Clinic dermatologist.

What's the difference between a food allergy and food intolerance?
Signs of a food intolerance often are limited to digestive problems, and you may be able to eat small amounts of the offending food without trouble. A true food allergy causes an immune system reaction and can cause a range of symptoms. In some cases, an allergic food reaction can be severe or life-threatening. Learn more from Dr. James Li, a Mayo Clinic allergist and immunologist.

PLUS ADDITIONAL HIGHLIGHTS
Ruptured eardrum: An overview
Slideshow: 5 smart exercise choices for psoriatic arthritis
Liposuction: What you can expect
First aid for snakebites

HEALTHY RECIPES
Tofu with hoisin and baby bok choy
Greek salad with spinach and eggplant
Thyme-roasted beets
Minty lime iced tea

HEALTH TIP OF THE WEEK
Does traveling make you sick?
If you get motion sickness, try these suggestions:

  1. Focus on the horizon or a distant, stationary object.
  2. Keep your head still while resting against a seatback.
  3. Steer clear of alcohol and smoke.
  4. Don't overeat. Avoid spicy and greasy foods.
  5. If you become ill, eat dry crackers or drink a carbonated beverage to settle your stomach.
  6. To prevent motion sickness, try taking an over-the-counter antihistamine before you travel. Or ask your health care provider about a prescription adhesive patch that can prevent motion sickness.

Need practical advice on diet and exercise? Want creative solutions for stress and other lifestyle issues? Discover more healthy lifestyle topics at mayoclinic.org.

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