• By Dennis Douda

Little-Known Condition Causes 5%-10% of High Blood Pressure Cases

May 13, 2014

More than 1 out of 4 Americans has high blood pressure. For millions of them, a little-known condition is to blame; primary aldosteronism or PA. It's caused when nodules on the adrenal glands increase the production of a specific, and even toxic,  hormone. The good news - the right treatment may cure their hypertension permanently and even save their life. Dennis Douda has more on how the condition is diagnosed and treated. A word of caution: There are graphic surgery images in the video. [TRT 2:21]

To read the script, click here.

Journalists: The video package and additional b-roll are available in the downloads. (TV stations: The graphic surgery images are at 1:35 & 1:55 in the video.)

Members of the media wishing to interview Dr. William Young may call 507-284-5005 or write to newsbureau@mayo.edu to make a request. 

May be this is a knee jerk reaction but I feel on developing and adjusting schedules based on workload has a tendency to forget peoples lives outside of work. It seems to be an increasing trend that the balance between work and a health home life is being sacrificed to the bottom line and metrics. When you have happy appreciated employees studies have shown improved productivity. I think sometimes the human factor is lost in the drive toward efficiencies.

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I totally agree with Vincent!!

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So do I.

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Not to mention that your "patient" workload cannot accurately reflect the dozens of phone calls and appointments that desk staff do on a daily basis. There have been countless times where our staff load is reduced only to let those that do work run behind and potentialy make errors that wouldn't have happened if we weren't rushing.

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This collaborative appears to align staffing to workload so that work is shared equally. Therefore, the goal is to help workers have proper balance of work and home, which would lead to happier and productive employees. I understand the comments but isn't this what the collaborative is striving to accomplish? This is an excellent opportunity for all managers to participate.

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The Staffing to Workload collaborative offerings first started in April 2009.So far >50 outpatient (clinical and administrative) teams have participated. This is an opportunity for departments and units to align their staffing based on fluctuating workloads. The aim is to meet the needs of our patients with the right amount of staff available at the right time. Please follow the link above to view the content/report outs by previous teams ~ Staffing to Workload Collaborative faculty

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I think the knee-jerk reaction from those writing in comments is to assume that the intent is to do more with less. This could also be an opportunity to ensure your team has the headcount needed during peak times. In our competitive world, I think we all need to ensure we work smarter, not harder so this is an opportunity to see what positive changes can be made.

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It would appear this is more in relation to "hourly" employee and not exempt employees (but I could be wrong). There are many departments in which the "exempt" employees are also feeling the stress of get it done with less or maybe there's someone else that will. I too believe that the work/live balance has been put on the back burner.

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I am glad to see we are looking at this logically for a balance. So many times in the past we keep finding new ways to complete task with new areas coming online to support. To date we haven't added any new staff to our area in several years. I hope we don't sacrifice quality for quantity.

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I have gone through this collaborative in my previous position at Mayo, and it's intention is not to make you do more work with less people, but rather how to use the staff you have effectively in terms of hours and shifts, as well as to give hard proof of the need for MORE staff when incremental and replacement staff requests are made. It was a lot of work, but it was good to do and the end results were worth the effort. Just my two cents.

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We have gone through a adjustment process under the staffing to workload ratio. I know the results will show that we benifited from it as they more than likley had results formed up before they acually moved hours, but what i see is still not the people on task when we are needed. Days start short and end short but we have plenty during day when things are running smooth. More needs to be done with how many staff is on during each day. So far nothing has really changed except confussion.

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I, too, agree with Vincent.

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"the right staffing to workload ratio" How do they determine this exactly?

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This is not necessarily a negative thing. Staffing to workload awareness can result in having increased staffing in departments.

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I can see Vincent's point, but having gone through this collaborative …. I agree more with Tracy. This is not about doing more with less; it is about getting tools to analyze your workload and how staffing impacts your work. Learning to use these tools takes some time, but well worth the effort!

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Patient in hospital bed