• By Dana Sparks

MAYO CLINIC RADIO

December 5, 2014

illustration of liver transplant duct-to-duct procedureOn Saturday, December 6, at 9 a.m. CT, Julie Heimbach, M.D., and Charles Rosen, M.D., will join us to talk about dramatic changes happening in the world of liver transplants. For instance, it wasn’t long ago that patients with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or a certain type of tumor would not have been eligible for a liver transplant. That's no longer true.  We’ll also discuss a fairly novel approach to patients with obesity-related liver disease, which is to combine liver transplant with bariatric surgery.  Obesity is one of the fastest growing reasons for needing a liver transplant. We hope you’ll join us.

Myth or Matter of Fact:  I have a history of medical illness.  I would not be a suitable donor.operating room medical team in surgery

 

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Great Story!

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Good to hear that our physicians are sticking to Mayo commitment of "Patient comes first', no matter where they are and whether they are on job or not.

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Well done.

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I am proud to say that I have worked with 2 of those physicians and she was in excellent hands.

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Probably the closest to a dream team you could have to bring you back from a cardiovascular event! Well done Dr. Miller, Dr. Daly, and Dr. Viozzi!!

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Congratulations to your medical staff for saving her life, but I am a little concerned that the flight didn't make an medical emergency landing in the United States but rather flew her all the way to Amsterdam?

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Great story! Sad to see the airline decided to actually continue the full duration of this 9-hour flight, even after the woman collapsed shortly after take-off.

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Guess that is why I like to fly out of MSP/RST….always a chance that a few extra angels are on board!

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@peterstrand

Congratulations to your medical staff for saving her life, but I am a little concerned that the flight didn't make an medical emergency landing in the United States but rather flew her all the way to Amsterdam?

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Agreed — I'd be curious to hear the reason for that decision…

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Angels, indeed. So proud of these amazing physicians, so proud to be part of the Mayo family! Thank you for sharing this tremendous story.

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A few people have questioned why the plane didn't land in the US, but continued on to Amsterdam. I'm not sure it was reported correctly that the event occured "shortly after takeoff". Rather, I believe they were already well over the Atlantic.

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Perhaps a little too much focus is being given to the word "shortly," which probably should not have been used. Whatever the exact amount of time that had elapsed, we’re told the team was able to get Ms. Bolin stable enough that the flight did not have to be diverted or turned around.

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It is awesome the way our Mayo physicians jumped into action as if it is the most normal everday thing for them to do. As always, they make each of us proud to work for this institution as they continue to uphold our core values of "The Pt Comes First". Thanks to all 3 of them for not hesitating to jump in and do what they do best…care for people who need them.

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