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1 day ago · #MayoClinicRadio podcast: 10/12/19

Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio: 10/12/19

On the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast, Dr. Jean Fox, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses fecal incontinence, including treatment options and prevention. Also on the podcast, Dr. Ekta Kapoor, a Mayo Clinic internal medicine and women’s health physician, explains the dangers of excess belly fat. And Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist and human performance expert, discusses a recent study examining whether pushups can predict your future health. 

1 day ago · Mayo Clinic Radio: Breast reconstruction surgery / heart care for breast cancer patients / male breast cancer

Around 250,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even as cancer treatments have become increasingly targeted and refined, many women choose to have a mastectomy versus lumpectomy and radiation. And close to half of women who undergo mastectomy have reconstruction using one of two options: reconstruction with implant surgery or reconstruction with flap surgery.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and three breast cancer topics will be featured on the next Mayo Clinic Radio program. Dr. Sarvam TerKonda, a Mayo Clinic plastic surgeon, will discuss reconstruction surgery after breast cancer treatment. Also, Dr. Jordan Ray, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, will explain the importance of heart care for breast cancer patients. And Dr. Kathryn Ruddy, a Mayo Clinic medical oncologist, will discuss the rare and often overlooked disease of male breast cancer.

To hear the program, find an affiliate in your area.

Use the hashtag #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows or subscribe to the podcast.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

5 days ago · Fecal incontinence: Symptoms, treatment and prevention

Doctor holding application form while consulting patient

Being unable to control bowel movements, called fecal incontinence, is a common problem in people as they age. Fecal incontinence can range from an occasional leakage of stool while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Common causes of fecal incontinence include diarrhea, constipation, and muscle or nerve damage. The muscle or nerve damage may be associated with aging or giving birth. While fecal incontinence is embarrassing and difficult to talk about, health care providers can offer treatments to help control the condition and improve quality of life for patients.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Jean Fox, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, will discuss fecal incontinence. Also on the program, Dr. Ekta Kapoor, a Mayo Clinic internal medicine and women’s health physician, will explain the dangers of excess belly fat. And Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist and human performance expert, will discuss a recent study examining whether pushups can predict your future health. 

To hear the program, find an affiliate in your area.

Use the hashtag #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows or subscribe to the podcast.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Mon, Oct 7 1:44pm · Mayo Clinic Radio: Fecal incontinence / excess belly fat / can pushups predict your future?

Being unable to control bowel movements, called fecal incontinence, is a common problem in people as they age. Fecal incontinence can range from an occasional leakage of stool while passing gas to a complete loss of bowel control. Common causes of fecal incontinence include diarrhea, constipation, and muscle or nerve damage. The muscle or nerve damage may be associated with aging or giving birth. While fecal incontinence is embarrassing and difficult to talk about, health care providers can offer treatments to help control the condition and improve quality of life for patients.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Jean Fox, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, will discuss fecal incontinence. Also on the program, Dr. Ekta Kapoor, a Mayo Clinic internal medicine and women’s health physician, will explain the dangers of excess belly fat. And Dr. Michael Joyner, a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist and human performance expert, will discuss a recent study examining whether pushups can predict your future health.

To hear the program, find an affiliate in your area.

Miss the show? Here’s your Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

Use the hashtag #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows or subscribe to the podcast.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Mon, Oct 7 1:00pm · #MayoClinicRadio podcast: 10/5/19

Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 10/5/19

On the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast, Dr. Todd Milbrandt, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, explains treatment options for scoliosis, including a new option, vertebral body tether implant. Also on the podcast, Dr. Leslie Sim, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, discusses eating disorders in adults, including gender and ethnic discrepancies in seeking treatment. And, Dr. C. Robert Stanhope, a retired Mayo Clinic OB-GYN, shares a career retrospective.

Thu, Oct 3 11:00am · Tether implant offers new treatment option for some scoliosis patients

a medical illustration of a spine with scoliosis, highlighting degeneration of the spinal joints

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. Most cases of scoliosis are mild, but some spine deformities continue to get more severe as children grow. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly. 

Children who have mild scoliosis are monitored closely, usually with X-rays, to see if the curve is worsening. In many cases, no treatment is necessary. However, some children will need to wear a brace to stop the curve from worsening. Others may need surgery. The most common type of scoliosis surgery is called spinal fusion, where surgeons connect two or more of the bones in the spine — the vertebrae — together so that they can’t move. While fusion straightens the spine, it has some lifelong consequences. For some patients with severe scoliosis, a surgical alternative to fusing the spine — vertebral body tether implant — is now available.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Todd Milbrandt, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, will explain treatment options for scoliosis. Also on the program, Dr. Leslie Sim, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, will discuss eating disorders in adults, including gender and ethnic discrepancies in seeking treatment. And, Dr. C. Robert Stanhope, a retired Mayo Clinic OB-GYN, will share a career retrospective.

To hear the program, find an affiliate in your area.

Use the hashtag #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows or subscribe to the podcast.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Mon, Sep 30 11:31am · Mayo Clinic Radio: Scoliosis / adult eating disorders / career retrospective

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. Most cases of scoliosis are mild, but some spine deformities continue to get more severe as children grow. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly.

Children who have mild scoliosis are monitored closely, usually with X-rays, to see if the curve is worsening. In many cases, no treatment is necessary. However, some children will need to wear a brace to stop the curve from worsening. Others may need surgery. The most common type of scoliosis surgery is called spinal fusion, where surgeons connect two or more of the bones in the spine — the vertebrae — together so that they can’t move. While fusion straightens the spine, it has some lifelong consequences. For some patients with severe scoliosis, a surgical alternative to fusing the spine — vertebral body tether implant — is now available.

On the next Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. Todd Milbrandt, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, will explain treatment options for scoliosis. Also on the program, Dr. Leslie Sim, a Mayo Clinic psychologist, will discuss eating disorders in adults, including gender and ethnic discrepancies in seeking treatment. And, Dr. C. Robert Stanhope, a retired Mayo Clinic OB-GYN, will share a career retrospective.

To hear the program, find an affiliate in your area.

Miss the show? Here’s the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast.

Use the hashtag #MayoClinicRadio, and tweet your questions.

Mayo Clinic Radio is on iHeartRadio.

Access archived shows or subscribe to the podcast.

Mayo Clinic Radio produces a weekly one-hour radio program highlighting health and medical information from Mayo Clinic.

Mon, Sep 30 10:00am · #MayoClinicRadio podcast: 9/28/19

Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 9/28/19

An estimated 20 million Americans have sleep apnea, and many don’t even know it. On the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast, Dr. Timothy Morgenthaler, a Mayo Clinic sleep medicine specialist, discusses diagnosing and treating sleep apnea. Dr. Morgenthaler also serves as chief patient safety officer for Mayo Clinic. Also on the podcast, Dr. Brent Bauer, director of research for the Mayo Clinic Integrative Medicine Program, and Dr. Karen Mauck, a Mayo Clinic internal medicine specialist, discuss how to know which CBD products are safe to use. And Dr. Kaisorn Chaichana, a Mayo Clinic neurologic surgeon, explains new brain mapping techniques for hard-to-treat brain tumors.