Mayo Clinic Q&A

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Episodes Making progress in treating glioblastoma

a microscopic slide of glioblastoma brain cancer cells

Making progress in treating glioblastoma
July 26, 2021

When it comes to malignant tumors in the brain and spinal cord, glioblastoma is the most common. Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of cancer that forms from cells called astrocytes in the brain or the spinal cord. Glioblastoma can occur at any age, but it's more common in older adults. It can cause worsening headaches, nausea, vomiting and seizures. 

Glioblastoma can be difficult to treat. Current treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, but thanks to research and clinical trials, new therapies are being developed.

"We're coming together as a community to treat this," says Dr. Wendy Sherman, a Mayo Clinic neurologist. "We're getting more patients on trial and we're being smarter about our trials. It's an exciting time for our field, and I'm very hopeful that we're going to make progress on this."

A cure is often not possible, but disease management and treatment may slow progression of the cancer and decrease the side effects.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Sherman discusses glioblastoma diagnosis, treatment, and research.