Mayo Clinic Q&A

From complex or serious conditions like cancer and heart disease to the latest news on research and wellness, host Dr. Halena Gazelka asks the questions and gets easy-to-understand answers from Mayo Clinic experts

Most Recent Episodes

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How do vaccines work?
Sept. 1, 2020

Vaccines are at the forefront of daily news about COVID-19Vaccines help prevent diseases that can be dangerous or even deadly by working with the body’s immune system. But how exactly do vaccines work?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, gives an overview of vaccines, including the different types of vaccines and how you can make sure you are up to date with all recommended vaccinations.

Research disclosures for Dr. Gregory Poland.

a white or perhaps a Latina woman in a white t-shirt sitting on the edge of bed, holding her hand to her chest, out of concern, stress, worry, heart pain

Heart muscle damage from COVID-19
Aug. 31, 2020

From the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was that known the disease affected the lungs. But some of the most severe damage to the body can be to the heart muscle. COVID-related myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle, can cause severe damage and sometimes death. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Leslie Cooper, chair of Cardiology at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses how COVID-19 affects the heart in hospitalized patients, in young people and he identifies areas of research that need to be pursued in the near future.

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From the front lines of the COVID-19 battle
Aug. 28, 2020

Health care workers across the country have been on the front lines fighting the coronavirus for more than six months. COVID-19 has presented extraordinary challenges in treating patients and helping families cope, and those challenges are taking a toll on the health care workers themselves.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Ayan Sen, chair of Critical Care Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, shares his experiences managing patients and supporting staff during the pandemic.

Listener mailbag – COVID-19 questions answered
Aug. 26, 2020

During the COVID-19 pandemic, new information about the disease is discovered on a weekly basis and it can be hard to keep up. On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, answers listeners' questions on COVID-19.

Does hand sanitizer expire? Is a face shield effective in protecting me from the virus? How long do I need to quarantine if I've been exposed? Get answers to these questions and more on today's episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A.

Research disclosures for Dr. Gregory Poland.

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Strategic Management and Resource Team team helps keep patients safe during COVID-19
Aug. 24, 2020

In an effort to see patients safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, Mayo Clinic developed a Strategic Management and Resource Team, also known as a SMaRT team, to help institute safety measures like universal masking, expanded cleaning protocols and use of virtual visits. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. A. Noelle Larson, an orthopedic surgeon at Mayo Clinic who serves as her department's SMaRT representative, explains how orthopedic surgery is safely seeing patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Larson also discusses her practice, including the vertebral body tether implant, an innovative treatment for some patients with moderate to severe scoliosis.

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Study finds link between hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, menopausal hot flashes
Aug. 21, 2020

A study recently conducted at Mayo Clinic found that women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy were more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and hot flashes are both linked to heart disease risk. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Stephanie Faubion, the study's lead author, will discuss the key takeaways from the study and explain where more research is needed. Dr. Faubion is the Penny and Bill George Director for Mayo Clinic's Center for Women's Health.

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Strict adherence to public health measures effective in combating COVID-19
Aug. 19, 2020

Until a vaccine is developed, public health measures are the best defense against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These measures include masking, hand hygiene and physical distancing. "Strict adherence to those things is a very powerful antidote to this virus," says  Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest news on COVID-19, including what has been learned about herd immunity and contact tracing, as well as the effectiveness of different types of masks.

Research disclosures for Dr. Gregory Poland.

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Using AI to determine heart failure diagnosis
Aug. 17, 2020

When people seek emergency care for shortness of breath, it can be challenging to determine the cause. A new Mayo Clinic study found that using an EKG enhanced by artificial intelligence (AI) is better than standard blood tests at determining if the shortness of breath is caused by heart failure.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Demilade Adedinsewo, lead author of the study and chief fellow in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida, discusses how AI is improving patient care in the emergency department.

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The importance of a healthy mindset to start the school year
Aug. 12, 2020

The start of a new school year is always a time that’s filled with excitement and anxiety. This year, COVID-19 is making back to school even more challenging for kids, teachers and parents. Whether in person, online or a hybrid approach, this school year will be different for students and staff. How can you and your child have a healthy mindset for this school year?

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Craig Sawchuk, chair of the Division of Integrated Behavioral Health at Mayo Clinic, shares helpful tips and strategies to be resilient and handle the challenges of a school year during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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What is viral shedding?
Aug. 12, 2020

When a person is infected with a virus, the virus multiplies in the body and can be released into the environment through sneezing, coughing or even speaking. This release is called "shedding" and viral shedding is how COVID-19 is spread from person to person. How long a person who has COVID-19 will shed virus is still unknown.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses viral shedding and why asymptomatic carriers of COVID-19 are a big concern.

Research disclosures for Dr. Gregory Poland.