Mayo Clinic Q&A

From complex or serious conditions like cancer and heart disease to the latest news on research and wellness, host Dr. Halena Gazelka asks the questions and gets easy-to-understand answers from Mayo Clinic experts

Most Recent Episodes

physician or medical staff person holding a heart symbol with Artificial Intelligence icon and other icons representing futuristic technology in medicine

How artificial intelligence is revealing physiological age
July 1, 2020

The heart doesn’t lie, and you may be surprised to learn that your heart can even reveal your physiological age. Artificial intelligence (AI) applied to an EKG can now measure your body's health. 

On the debut episode of the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Paul Friedman and Dr. Suraj Kapa — both Mayo Clinic cardiologists —explain how your body's age might differ from what's on your birth certificate.

Watch as hosts Dr. Tom Shives and Tracy McCray learn their physiological age.

Don't miss an episode. Subscribe to the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast today.

Medical illustration of living kidney donation

The living-kidney donation option
June 24, 2020

While 6,000 people chose living-kidney donation in 2018, experts say the pool of potential donors is still untapped. Educating would-be donors and recipients about the advantages of living donation is key.

Dr. Mikel Prieto, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon, discusses the living kidney donation option.

Ingredients for a healthy vegetable salad with lettuce, chickpeas and avocados

Cancer and nutrition
June 17, 2020

When it comes to fighting cancer or living with a cancer diagnosis, does what you eat make a difference? Nutrition is an important thing to consider for people with cancer. Eating healthy foods before, during, and after treatment can help patients feel better and stay stronger. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A, Dr. John Shin, a hematologist and oncologist, discusses nutrition and cancer.

a young child in a t-shirt getting a vaccination, flu shot

Why it's critical for children to get their routine health care
June 15, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has put a hold on many activities. But one thing that shouldn't fall by the wayside is your child's health.

On this episode of Mayo Clinic Q&A, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a pediatric infectious disease specialist, discusses the importance of routine checkups, including keeping up with vaccination schedules.

Medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic
June 10, 2020

Across the world, one of the biggest changes forced by the COVID-19 pandemic is in the field of education. Programs from kindergarten through postsecondary have rapidly moved to a distance learning model. Online and remote instruction has its own unique challenges, and has required students and educators to be creative to stay connected.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Alexandra Wolanskyj-Spinner, senior associate dean for student affairs at the Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in Minnesota, discusses medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

person sitting on the beach in a hat under the shade of an umbrella

Precautions for a summer of COVID-19
Jun. 9, 2020

With the onset of warmer weather and more and more states loosening their COVID-19 restrictions, lots of folks are wondering about some summer staples, like cookouts and a day at the beach or pool. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, an infectious disease specialist at Mayo Clinic, discusses how you can minimize your risk during common summertime scenarios.

How information technology helps in the COVID-19 response
June 3, 2020

During to the COVID-19 pandemic, teleworking and distance learning has become a necessity. The new normal means many people needed technology to do their jobs, and that is certainly true at Mayo Clinic. Information technology (IT) has aided Mayo Clinic during the pandemic in two significant ways. One, thousands of employees moved out of their offices and into their homes to work. And two, patients now more than ever are being seen by their health care providers using video visits and tele-health.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Mark Henderson, division chair of IT at Mayo Clinic, discusses how IT has aided in the COVID-19 response.

Expedited breast cancer treatment
June 2, 2020

During the COVID-19 pandemic, one thing that hasn’t stopped is the need for cancer treatment. While patients might be hesitant to leave their homes for weeks at a time for treatment, there is a fast-track treatment option at Mayo Clinic for some breast cancer patients. Certain low-risk breast cancer patients can now complete their surgery and radiation in less than 10 days. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tina Hieken, a Mayo Clinic surgeon, explains how the expedited treatment program combines a pathologist's mid-surgery confirmation that the cancer has not spread, with a type of partial breast radiation called brachytherapy

Health and Human Services plays key role in supporting Americans amid COVID-19 crisis
May 28, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a unique situation that has required work across federal and state agencies to support communities and frontline workers during this challenging time. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has played a key role by providing effective health and human services and fostering advances in medicine, public health and social services during the COVID-19 crisis. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Eric Hargan, HHS deputy secretary, discusses the ways the department is supporting Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Spike (S) proteins on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, give the virus its corona (crown-like) appearance. These spike proteins bind to receptors on healthy cells and fuse with their outer membrane. The SARS-CoV-2 then delivers its genome into the cell and uses the cell’s machinery to replicate itself.

What we know about virus transmission
May 27, 2020

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the most common mode of transmission for COVID-19 is through close contact from person to person. While it is possible that someone can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose or possibly their eyes, this isn’t thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, discusses virus transmission and steps to take to keep yourself safe.

Research disclosures for Dr. Gregory Poland.